Kirsten O'Hearn

Summary

Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Working memory impairment in people with Williams syndrome: effects of delay, task and stimuli
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Laboratory of Neurocognitive Development, 112 Loeffler Building, 121 Meyran Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Brain Cogn 69:495-503. 2009
  2. pmc The development of individuation in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 39:494-509. 2013
  3. pmc Object recognition in Williams syndrome: uneven ventral stream activation
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, USA
    Dev Sci 14:549-65. 2011
  4. pmc Deficits in adults with autism spectrum disorders when processing multiple objects in dynamic scenes
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Autism Res 4:132-42. 2011
  5. pmc Lack of developmental improvement on a face memory task during adolescence in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:3955-60. 2010
  6. pmc Developmental profiles for multiple object tracking and spatial memory: typically developing preschoolers and people with Williams syndrome
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Dev Sci 13:430-40. 2010
  7. doi request reprint Mathematical skills in Williams syndrome: insight into the importance of underlying representations
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    Dev Disabil Res Rev 15:11-20. 2009
  8. doi request reprint Neurodevelopment and executive function in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 20:1103-32. 2008
  9. pmc Mathematical skill in individuals with Williams syndrome: evidence from a standardized mathematics battery
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Brain Cogn 64:238-46. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Object recognition with severe spatial deficits in Williams syndrome: sparing and breakdown
    Barbara Landau
    Department of Cognitive Science, Krieger Hall, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Cognition 100:483-510. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. pmc Working memory impairment in people with Williams syndrome: effects of delay, task and stimuli
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Laboratory of Neurocognitive Development, 112 Loeffler Building, 121 Meyran Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Brain Cogn 69:495-503. 2009
    ..Abnormalities in the parietal lobe/dorsal stream in WS may damage not only the representation of spatial location but may also impact WM for visual stimuli more generally...
  2. pmc The development of individuation in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 39:494-509. 2013
    ..These results reveal how core visual processes function in autism, and provide insight into the architecture of vision (i.e., individuation appears distinct from visual strengths in autism, such as visual search)...
  3. pmc Object recognition in Williams syndrome: uneven ventral stream activation
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, USA
    Dev Sci 14:549-65. 2011
    ..We discuss the possible causes of this unusual topography and implications for understanding the behavioral profile of people with WS...
  4. pmc Deficits in adults with autism spectrum disorders when processing multiple objects in dynamic scenes
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    Autism Res 4:132-42. 2011
    ..Improvements in visual processing that underlie mature representation of scenes may not occur in ASD, suggesting that late developing brain processes are affected...
  5. pmc Lack of developmental improvement on a face memory task during adolescence in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:3955-60. 2010
    ..This result underscores the importance of characterizing adolescent development for understanding ASD, and suggests additional opportunities for intervention...
  6. pmc Developmental profiles for multiple object tracking and spatial memory: typically developing preschoolers and people with Williams syndrome
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Dev Sci 13:430-40. 2010
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Mathematical skills in Williams syndrome: insight into the importance of underlying representations
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA
    Dev Disabil Res Rev 15:11-20. 2009
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Neurodevelopment and executive function in autism
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 20:1103-32. 2008
    ..Despite developmental gains, mature executive functioning is limited in autism, reflecting abnormalities in wide-spread brain networks that may lead to impaired processing of complex information across all domains...
  9. pmc Mathematical skill in individuals with Williams syndrome: evidence from a standardized mathematics battery
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Brain Cogn 64:238-46. 2007
    ..These findings add to evidence that components of mathematical knowledge may be differentially damaged in developmental disorders...
  10. ncbi request reprint Object recognition with severe spatial deficits in Williams syndrome: sparing and breakdown
    Barbara Landau
    Department of Cognitive Science, Krieger Hall, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Cognition 100:483-510. 2006
    ....
  11. pmc Orientation perception in Williams Syndrome: discrimination and integration
    Melanie Palomares
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 20874, USA
    Brain Cogn 70:21-30. 2009
    ..These may reflect largely separate visuospatial mechanisms...
  12. pmc Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams syndrome
    Melanie Palomares
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 20874, USA
    Perception 38:186-99. 2009
    ..Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development...
  13. pmc Visuospatial interpolation in typically developing children and in people with Williams Syndrome
    Melanie Palomares
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Ames Hall, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Vision Res 48:2439-50. 2008
    ..We hypothesize that WS individuals and young children can use stimulus-driven grouping cues for bottom-up integration, but have immature mechanisms for top-down integration of spatial information...
  14. pmc Multiple object tracking in people with Williams syndrome and in normally developing children
    Kirsten O'Hearn
    Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:905-12. 2005
    ..Error analysis revealed that all groups had "slippery" indexes, falsely identifying target neighbors, and further suggested that people with Williams syndrome deploy fewer indexes than do people without this disorder...
  15. pmc What has fMRI told us about the development of cognitive control through adolescence?
    Beatriz Luna
    Laboratory of Neurocognitive Development, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Brain Cogn 72:101-13. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Objects, motions, and paths: spatial language in children with Williams syndrome
    Barbara Landau
    Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Dev Neuropsychol 23:105-37. 2003
    ..These findings have implications for the relationship between spatial language and other aspects of spatial cognition...
  17. doi request reprint Vision for perception and vision for action: normal and unusual development
    Daniel D Dilks
    Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, USA
    Dev Sci 11:474-86. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that the 'how' system may be relatively slow to develop and more vulnerable to breakdown than the 'what' system...
  18. pmc Spatial representation across species: geometry, language, and maps
    Barbara Landau
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 19:12-9. 2009
    ..The capacity to reorient using geometry is present in humans by the age of 18 months...
  19. ncbi request reprint Starting at the end: the importance of goals in spatial language
    Laura Lakusta
    Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Krieger Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Cognition 96:1-33. 2005
    ..g. 'give' vs. 'get'). The results are discussed in terms of non-linguistic foundations of spatial language and the linguistic mapping biases that arise when we describe what we see...
  20. ncbi request reprint Figure copying in Williams syndrome and normal subjects
    Maria Alexandra Georgopoulos
    Brain Sciences Center, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA
    Exp Brain Res 157:137-46. 2004
    ..These findings indicate that the principles guiding copying are similar in the two groups and suggest that WS is a case of developmental rather than deviance disorder...
  21. ncbi request reprint Motion processing specialization in Williams syndrome
    Jason E Reiss
    Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716, USA
    Vision Res 45:3379-90. 2005
    ..The nature of the motion deficit is considered, including the implications for WS dorsal/ventral processing...
  22. ncbi request reprint Spatial breakdown in spatial construction: evidence from eye fixations in children with Williams syndrome
    James E Hoffman
    Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
    Cogn Psychol 46:260-301. 2003
    ..Moreover, estimates of the errors in representing the identity and location of model blocks derived from Experiment 2 provided a good account of the observed errors in the block construction task of Experiment 1...
  23. ncbi request reprint Intact perception of biological motion in the face of profound spatial deficits: Williams syndrome
    Heather Jordan
    Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark 19716, USA
    Psychol Sci 13:162-7. 2002
    ..They provide the first evidence of selective sparing of a specialized spatial system in individuals with a known genetic impairment...