G Oberdorster

Summary

Affiliation: University of Rochester
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Ultrafine particle deposition in humans during rest and exercise
    Christopher C Daigle
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 15:539-52. 2003
  2. pmc Concept of assessing nanoparticle hazards considering nanoparticle dosemetric and chemical/biological response metrics
    Erik K Rushton
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14624, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 73:445-61. 2010
  3. pmc Concepts of nanoparticle dose metric and response metric
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Environ Health Perspect 115:A290. 2007
  4. pmc Changes in deceleration capacity of heart rate and heart rate variability induced by ambient air pollution in individuals with coronary artery disease
    Alexandra Schneider
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany
    Part Fibre Toxicol 7:29. 2010
  5. pmc Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of blood markers in patients with chronic pulmonary disease
    Katharina Hildebrandt
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Munich, Germany
    Part Fibre Toxicol 6:25. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Translocation of inhaled ultrafine particles to the brain
    G Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 16:437-45. 2004
  7. doi request reprint Safety assessment for nanotechnology and nanomedicine: concepts of nanotoxicology
    G Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    J Intern Med 267:89-105. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Extrapulmonary translocation of ultrafine carbon particles following whole-body inhalation exposure of rats
    Gunter Oberdorster
    University of Rochester, Department of Environmental Medicine, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 65:1531-43. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Toxicokinetics and effects of fibrous and nonfibrous particles
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, 575 Elmwood Avenue, Box EHSC, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 14:29-56. 2002
  10. pmc Nanotoxicology: an emerging discipline evolving from studies of ultrafine particles
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:823-39. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications37

  1. ncbi request reprint Ultrafine particle deposition in humans during rest and exercise
    Christopher C Daigle
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 15:539-52. 2003
    ..Fractional deposition of ultrafine particles during mouth breathing is high in healthy subjects, and increases further with exercise...
  2. pmc Concept of assessing nanoparticle hazards considering nanoparticle dosemetric and chemical/biological response metrics
    Erik K Rushton
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14624, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 73:445-61. 2010
    ....
  3. pmc Concepts of nanoparticle dose metric and response metric
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Environ Health Perspect 115:A290. 2007
  4. pmc Changes in deceleration capacity of heart rate and heart rate variability induced by ambient air pollution in individuals with coronary artery disease
    Alexandra Schneider
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany
    Part Fibre Toxicol 7:29. 2010
    ..The study assessed the association between deceleration capacity (DC) as well as heart rate variability (HRV) and ambient particulate matter (PM) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD)...
  5. pmc Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of blood markers in patients with chronic pulmonary disease
    Katharina Hildebrandt
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Munich, Germany
    Part Fibre Toxicol 6:25. 2009
    ..abstract:..
  6. ncbi request reprint Translocation of inhaled ultrafine particles to the brain
    G Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 16:437-45. 2004
    ..It could provide a portal of entry into the CNS for solid UFP, circumventing the tight blood-brain barrier. Whether this translocation of inhaled UFP can cause CNS effects needs to be determined in future studies...
  7. doi request reprint Safety assessment for nanotechnology and nanomedicine: concepts of nanotoxicology
    G Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    J Intern Med 267:89-105. 2010
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Extrapulmonary translocation of ultrafine carbon particles following whole-body inhalation exposure of rats
    Gunter Oberdorster
    University of Rochester, Department of Environmental Medicine, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 65:1531-43. 2002
    ..Such translocation to blood and extrapulmonary tissues may well be different between ultrafine carbon and other insoluble (metal) ultrafine particles...
  9. ncbi request reprint Toxicokinetics and effects of fibrous and nonfibrous particles
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, 575 Elmwood Avenue, Box EHSC, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 14:29-56. 2002
    ..Moreover, for organic fibers it is likely that different rules may have to be established for characterization of their toxic and carcinogenic potential...
  10. pmc Nanotoxicology: an emerging discipline evolving from studies of ultrafine particles
    Gunter Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 113:823-39. 2005
    ..An interdisciplinary team approach (e.g., toxicology, materials science, medicine, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, to name a few) is mandatory for nanotoxicology research to arrive at an appropriate risk assessment...
  11. ncbi request reprint Pulmonary effects of inhaled ultrafine particles
    G Oberdorster
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 575 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Int Arch Occup Environ Health 74:1-8. 2001
    ..The hypothesis that ultrafine particles are causally involved in adverse responses seen in sensitive humans is based on several studies summarized in this brief review...
  12. ncbi request reprint Determinants of the pathogenicity of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF)
    G Oberdorster
    University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Environmental Medicine, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Int Arch Occup Environ Health 73:S60-8. 2000
    ..In particular, fiber biopersistence plays a most important role for pulmonary pathogenicities, and consequently biopersistence receives greatest attention in the search of new fibrous materials...
  13. ncbi request reprint Pulmonary inflammatory response to inhaled ultrafine particles is modified by age, ozone exposure, and bacterial toxin
    A C Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 12:227-46. 2000
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Induction of adaptation to inhaled lipopolysaccharide in young and old rats and mice
    A C Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, 575 Elmwood Ave, Box EHSC, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 12:225-43. 2000
    ..Therefore, we have demonstrated that inhaled low-dose LPS can induce adaptation to subsequent higher doses, much as has been shown for other toxicants that induce oxidative lung injury...
  15. ncbi request reprint Lung inflammation induced by endotoxin is enhanced in rats depleted of alveolar macrophages with aerosolized clodronate
    A Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Exp Lung Res 31:527-46. 2005
    ..These results indicate that cells other than AMs can recruit inflammatory cells into the lungs during acute LPS-induced injury and that AMs play an important suppressive role in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of on-road highway aerosol exposures on autonomic responses in aged, spontaneously hypertensive rats
    Alison Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 19:1-12. 2007
    ..These findings show that environmental exposure concentrations of mixed traffic-related UFP/gas-phase emissions can affect the autonomic nervous system...
  17. pmc Intratracheal instillation versus intratracheal inhalation: influence of cytokines on inflammatory response
    M Osier
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642 0001, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 105:1265-71. 1997
    ..Thus, it appears that increased BAL MIP-2 protein levels, but not TNF-alpha, correlate well with the inflammatory response, as measured by PMN numbers in lavaged cells, for both exposure systems...
  18. ncbi request reprint Efficient depletion of alveolar macrophages using intratracheally inhaled aerosols of liposome-encapsulated clodronate
    A C P Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Exp Lung Res 30:105-20. 2004
    ..We conclude that ITIH of clodronate liposomes in rats is both efficient and useful for examining the role of AMs in pulmonary toxicology...
  19. pmc Particulate-cell interactions and pulmonary cytokine expression
    J N Finkelstein
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 105:1179-82. 1997
    ..These results suggest that type II cell growth factor production may be significant in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis...
  20. ncbi request reprint Endotoxin potentiates ozone-induced pulmonary chemokine and inflammatory responses
    Carl J Johnston
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Exp Lung Res 28:419-33. 2002
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Regression of pulmonary lesions produced by inhaled titanium dioxide in rats
    R B Baggs
    Department of Environmental Medicine University of Rochester, NY, USA
    Vet Pathol 34:592-7. 1997
    ..There was no detectable fibroblast labeling at the 6-month observation and only very low levels at 12 months. Thus, although initially irritant, TiO2-induced lesions regressed during a 1-year period following cessation of exposure...
  22. ncbi request reprint Pulmonary function, diffusing capacity, and inflammation in healthy and asthmatic subjects exposed to ultrafine particles
    Anthony P Pietropaoli
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 16:59-72. 2004
    ..Additional studies are required to confirm these findings in normal subjects, compare them with additional susceptible patient populations, and determine their pathophysiologic mechanisms...
  23. pmc Induction of chemokines by low-dose intratracheal silica is reduced in TNFR I (p55) null mice
    Gloria S Pryhuber
    Department of Pediatrics, Strong Children s Research Center, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Toxicol Sci 72:150-7. 2003
    ..Silica dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the alveolar space and alveolar protein leak were, however, not altered by the absence of the TNF receptor...
  24. pmc Ultrafine particle deposition in subjects with asthma
    David C Chalupa
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 112:879-82. 2004
    ..76 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.10, p < 0.001). The efficient respiratory deposition of ultrafine particles increases further in subjects with asthma. Key words: air pollution, asthma, deposition, dosimetry, inhalation, ultrafine particles...
  25. ncbi request reprint Systemic effects of inhaled ultrafine particles in two compromised, aged rat strains
    Alison C P Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 16:461-71. 2004
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint On-road exposure to highway aerosols. 2. Exposures of aged, compromised rats
    Alison Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 16:41-53. 2004
    ..Furthermore, they demonstrate that on-road exposures are feasible and could be performed in future studies with more continuous particle exposures...
  27. ncbi request reprint Translocation and effects of ultrafine particles outside of the lung
    Alison Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Clin Occup Environ Med 5:785-96. 2006
    ..These translocation processes are explored here as well potential consequences that result from exposure of extrapulmonary organs to inhaled ultrafine particles...
  28. pmc Translocation of inhaled ultrafine manganese oxide particles to the central nervous system
    Alison Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 114:1172-8. 2006
    ..Studies in monkeys with intranasally instilled gold ultrafine particles (UFPs; <100 nm) and in rats with inhaled carbon UFPs suggested that solid UFPs deposited in the nose travel along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb...
  29. pmc Inhalation of ultrafine particles alters blood leukocyte expression of adhesion molecules in humans
    Mark W Frampton
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York 14642 8692, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 114:51-8. 2006
    ..Inhalation of elemental carbon UFPs alters peripheral blood leukocyte distribution and expression of adhesion molecules, in a pattern consistent with increased retention of leukocytes in the pulmonary vascular bed...
  30. ncbi request reprint Effects of subchronically inhaled carbon black in three species. I. Retention kinetics, lung inflammation, and histopathology
    Alison Elder
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Toxicol Sci 88:614-29. 2005
    ..From these results, a subchronic NOAEL of 1 mg/m(3) respirable HSCb (Printex 90) can be assigned to female rats, mice, and hamsters...
  31. pmc Comparing inhaled ultrafine versus fine zinc oxide particles in healthy adults: a human inhalation study
    William S Beckett
    Department of Envrionmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box EHSC, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 171:1129-35. 2005
    ..Ultrafine particles (< 0.1 microm diameter) are believed to be more potent than an equal mass of inhaled accumulation mode particles (0.1-1.0 microm diameter)...
  32. pmc ECG parameters and exposure to carbon ultrafine particles in young healthy subjects
    Wojciech Zareba
    Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Inhal Toxicol 21:223-33. 2009
    ..However, trends are observed indicating that some subjects might be susceptible to air pollution, with a response involving autonomic modulation of the heart and repolarization of the ventricular myocardium...
  33. ncbi request reprint The rat ear vein model for investigating in vivo thrombogenicity of ultrafine particles (UFP)
    Vanessa M Silva
    University of Rochester, Department of Environmental Medicine, Rochester, New York, USA
    Toxicol Sci 85:983-9. 2005
    ..These results are consistent with previous findings using the invasive model, and they validate the use of this non-invasive ear vein model to evaluate thrombogenic effects of UFP deposition in the respiratory tract...
  34. ncbi request reprint Clara cell secretory protein-deficient mice differ from wild-type mice in inflammatory chemokine expression to oxygen and ozone, but not to endotoxin
    C J Johnston
    Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Exp Lung Res 25:7-21. 1999
    ....
  35. doi request reprint The influence of protein adsorption on nanoparticle association with cultured endothelial cells
    Morton S Ehrenberg
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Goergen Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Biomaterials 30:603-10. 2009
    ..We therefore conclude that cellular association is not dependent on the identity of adsorbed proteins and therefore unlikely to require specific binding to any particular cellular receptors...
  36. pmc Nanoparticles and the brain: cause for concern?
    Gunter Oberdorster
    University of Rochester, Department of Environmental Medicine, 575 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    J Nanosci Nanotechnol 9:4996-5007. 2009
    ..The challenge is to identify such hazardous NPs and take appropriate measures to prevent exposure...