R C Morris

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Normotensive salt sensitivity: effects of race and dietary potassium
    R C Morris
    Department of Medicine, General Clinical Research Center, University of California, San Francisco 94143 0126, USA
    Hypertension 33:18-23. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Differing effects of supplemental KCl and KHCO3: pathophysiological and clinical implications
    R C Morris
    Department of Medicine, The University of California, San Francisco 94143 0126, USA
    Semin Nephrol 19:487-93. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Diet, evolution and aging--the pathophysiologic effects of the post-agricultural inversion of the potassium-to-sodium and base-to-chloride ratios in the human diet
    L Frassetto
    University of California, San Francisco 94143, USA
    Eur J Nutr 40:200-13. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Chloride-sensitive renal microangiopathy in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat
    M Tanaka
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    Kidney Int 59:1066-76. 2001
  5. doi request reprint Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet
    L A Frassetto
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Eur J Clin Nutr 63:947-55. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint A practical approach to the balance between acid production and renal acid excretion in humans
    L A Frassetto
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Nephrol 19:S33-40. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. ncbi request reprint Normotensive salt sensitivity: effects of race and dietary potassium
    R C Morris
    Department of Medicine, General Clinical Research Center, University of California, San Francisco 94143 0126, USA
    Hypertension 33:18-23. 1999
    ..Such suppression might prevent or delay the occurrence of hypertension, particularly in the many blacks, in whom dietary potassium is deficient...
  2. ncbi request reprint Differing effects of supplemental KCl and KHCO3: pathophysiological and clinical implications
    R C Morris
    Department of Medicine, The University of California, San Francisco 94143 0126, USA
    Semin Nephrol 19:487-93. 1999
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Diet, evolution and aging--the pathophysiologic effects of the post-agricultural inversion of the potassium-to-sodium and base-to-chloride ratios in the human diet
    L Frassetto
    University of California, San Francisco 94143, USA
    Eur J Nutr 40:200-13. 2001
    ..We argue that any level of acidosis may be unacceptable from an evolutionarily perspective, and indeed, that a low-grade metabolic alkalosis may be the optimal acid-base state for humans...
  4. ncbi request reprint Chloride-sensitive renal microangiopathy in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat
    M Tanaka
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    Kidney Int 59:1066-76. 2001
    ..We now ask the following question: In these SHRSP, is either such selectively Cl(-)-sensitive hypertension or hyperreninemia a pathogenetic determinant of renal microvasculopathy?..
  5. doi request reprint Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet
    L A Frassetto
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Eur J Clin Nutr 63:947-55. 2009
    ..We investigated in humans whether a diet similar to that consumed by our preagricultural hunter-gatherer ancestors (that is, a paleolithic type diet) confers health benefits...
  6. ncbi request reprint A practical approach to the balance between acid production and renal acid excretion in humans
    L A Frassetto
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Nephrol 19:S33-40. 2006
    ..We also briefly discuss what we believe the optimal NEAP for adult humans, and how to achieve that through diet...