Holly C Miller

Summary

Affiliation: University of Kentucky
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Self-control without a "self"?: common self-control processes in humans and dogs
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Psychol Sci 21:534-8. 2010
  2. doi request reprint "Counting" by pigeons: discrimination of the number of biologically relevant sequential events
    Rebecca M Rayburn-Reeves
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 38:169-76. 2010
  3. doi request reprint The case of the disappearing bone: dogs' understanding of the physical properties of objects
    Kristina F Pattison
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 85:278-82. 2010
  4. pmc Imitation and emulation by dogs using a bidirectional control procedure
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 80:109-14. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Preference for 50% reinforcement over 75% reinforcement by pigeons
    Cassandra D Gipson
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 37:289-98. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Object permanence in dogs: invisible displacement in a rotation task
    Holly C Miller
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:150-5. 2009
  7. doi request reprint A differential-outcomes effect using hedonically nondifferential outcomes with delayed matching to sample by pigeons
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 37:161-6. 2009
  8. pmc Matching-to-sample by pigeons: the dissociation of comparison choice frequency from the probability of reinforcement
    Thomas R Zentall
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, United States
    Behav Processes 78:185-90. 2008
  9. pmc What do dogs know about hidden objects?
    Holly C Miller
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 81:439-46. 2009
  10. pmc Within-trial contrast: The effect of probability of reinforcement in training
    Cassandra D Gipson
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, United States
    Behav Processes 82:126-32. 2009

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Self-control without a "self"?: common self-control processes in humans and dogs
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Psychol Sci 21:534-8. 2010
    ..These findings provide the first evidence that self-control relies on the same limited energy resource among humans and nonhumans. Our results have broad implications for the study of self-control processes in human and nonhuman species...
  2. doi request reprint "Counting" by pigeons: discrimination of the number of biologically relevant sequential events
    Rebecca M Rayburn-Reeves
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 38:169-76. 2010
    ..This procedure represents a sensitive and efficient method for studying numerical competence in animals...
  3. doi request reprint The case of the disappearing bone: dogs' understanding of the physical properties of objects
    Kristina F Pattison
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 85:278-82. 2010
    ..That is they appear to understand that an object (such as a screen) should not be able to pass through another object (such as dog bone)...
  4. pmc Imitation and emulation by dogs using a bidirectional control procedure
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 80:109-14. 2009
    ..Furthermore, we found that dogs would match the direction of screen-push demonstrated by a human and they were equally likely to match the direction in which the screen moved independently while a human was present...
  5. doi request reprint Preference for 50% reinforcement over 75% reinforcement by pigeons
    Cassandra D Gipson
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 37:289-98. 2009
    ..Such paradoxical choice may account for certain human appetitive risk-taking behavior (e.g., gambling) as well...
  6. doi request reprint Object permanence in dogs: invisible displacement in a rotation task
    Holly C Miller
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506, USA
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:150-5. 2009
    ..Once the conflict is eliminated, dogs show evidence of object permanence that includes invisibly displaced objects...
  7. doi request reprint A differential-outcomes effect using hedonically nondifferential outcomes with delayed matching to sample by pigeons
    Holly C Miller
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 0044, USA
    Learn Behav 37:161-6. 2009
    ....
  8. pmc Matching-to-sample by pigeons: the dissociation of comparison choice frequency from the probability of reinforcement
    Thomas R Zentall
    Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, United States
    Behav Processes 78:185-90. 2008
    ..Together, these experiments suggest that when the sample is not available, there is a partial dissociation between comparison choice and the probability of reinforcement associated with each of the comparison stimuli...
  9. pmc What do dogs know about hidden objects?
    Holly C Miller
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 0044, USA
    Behav Processes 81:439-46. 2009
    ..These results suggest that although a perceptual/conditioning mechanism may be involved for some dogs, it cannot account for the performance of others. It is likely that these other dogs showed true object permanence...
  10. pmc Within-trial contrast: The effect of probability of reinforcement in training
    Cassandra D Gipson
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, United States
    Behav Processes 82:126-32. 2009
    ..Although the hypothesis that the within-trial contrast effect was constrained by a performance ceiling was not confirmed, we did find a reliable within-trial contrast effect with 100% reinforcement...