Pranjal H Mehta

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Testosterone change after losing predicts the decision to compete again
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    Horm Behav 50:684-92. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Bridging human and animal research: a comparative approach to studies of personality and health
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 22:651-61. 2008
  3. doi request reprint The social endocrinology of dominance: basal testosterone predicts cortisol changes and behavior following victory and defeat
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:1078-93. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Importance of considering testosterone-cortisol interactions in predicting human aggression and dominance
    Justin M Carré
    Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Aggress Behav 37:489-91. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint The mismatch effect: when testosterone and status are at odds
    Robert A Josephs
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 90:999-1013. 2006
  6. doi request reprint Neural mechanisms of the testosterone-aggression relation: the role of orbitofrontal cortex
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 22:2357-68. 2010

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. ncbi request reprint Testosterone change after losing predicts the decision to compete again
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    Horm Behav 50:684-92. 2006
    ..Our discussion focuses on the theoretical implications of these findings for the link between short-term T changes and status-related behaviors...
  2. ncbi request reprint Bridging human and animal research: a comparative approach to studies of personality and health
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 22:651-61. 2008
    ..We conclude that a comparative approach can provide unique insights into personality psychology, especially into research on personality, immunity, and health...
  3. doi request reprint The social endocrinology of dominance: basal testosterone predicts cortisol changes and behavior following victory and defeat
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:1078-93. 2008
    ..These results provide novel evidence in humans that basal testosterone predicts cortisol reactivity and behavior following changes in social status. Implications for the social endocrinology of dominance are discussed...
  4. doi request reprint Importance of considering testosterone-cortisol interactions in predicting human aggression and dominance
    Justin M Carré
    Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Aggress Behav 37:489-91. 2011
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint The mismatch effect: when testosterone and status are at odds
    Robert A Josephs
    Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 90:999-1013. 2006
    ..In Study 3, the authors demonstrate that testosterone is a better predictor of behavior than self-report measures of the need for dominance. Discussion focuses on the value of measuring hormones in personality and social psychology...
  6. doi request reprint Neural mechanisms of the testosterone-aggression relation: the role of orbitofrontal cortex
    Pranjal H Mehta
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 22:2357-68. 2010
    ..The findings suggest that testosterone increases the propensity toward aggression because of reduced activation of the neural circuitry of impulse control and self-regulation...