S L McLellan

Summary

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast beaches following beach oiling
    Ryan J Newton
    School of Freshwater Sciences, Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e74265. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Sewage reflects the distribution of human faecal Lachnospiraceae
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 15:2213-27. 2013
  3. pmc Diversity and population structure of sewage-derived microorganisms in wastewater treatment plant influent
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 12:378-92. 2010
  4. pmc Clonal populations of thermotolerant Enterobacteriaceae in recreational water and their potential interference with fecal Escherichia coli counts
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 67:4934-8. 2001
  5. pmc Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from urban rivers and beach water
    Sandra L McLellan
    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Great Lakes WATER Institute, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 70:4658-65. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 53204, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 21:253-9. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Evidence for localized bacterial loading as the cause of chronic beach closings in a freshwater marina
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Water Res 37:2700-8. 2003
  8. pmc Genetic characterization of Escherichia coli populations from host sources of fecal pollution by using DNA fingerprinting
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:2587-94. 2003
  9. doi request reprint Reliability of mCP method for identification of Clostridium perfringens from faecal polluted aquatic environments
    S R Mueller-Spitz
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    J Appl Microbiol 108:1994-2002. 2010
  10. pmc Acinetobacter, Aeromonas and Trichococcus populations dominate the microbial community within urban sewer infrastructure
    J L Vandewalle
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 14:2538-52. 2012

Research Grants

  1. Detection of Pathogens in Avian Fecal Pollution
    SANDRA MCLELLAN; Fiscal Year: 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. pmc Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast beaches following beach oiling
    Ryan J Newton
    School of Freshwater Sciences, Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e74265. 2013
    ..Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. ..
  2. doi request reprint Sewage reflects the distribution of human faecal Lachnospiraceae
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 15:2213-27. 2013
    ..Development of source-specific alternative indicators would enhance water quality assessments, which leads to improved ecosystem health and reduced human health risk due to waterborne disease. ..
  3. pmc Diversity and population structure of sewage-derived microorganisms in wastewater treatment plant influent
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 12:378-92. 2010
    ..Microbial sewage communities represent a combination of inputs from human faecal microbes and enrichment of specific microbes from the environment to form a unique population structure...
  4. pmc Clonal populations of thermotolerant Enterobacteriaceae in recreational water and their potential interference with fecal Escherichia coli counts
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 67:4934-8. 2001
    ..These findings demonstrate that E. coli is a better indicator of fecal pollution than fecal coliforms, which may replicate in the environment and falsely elevate indicator organism levels...
  5. pmc Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from urban rivers and beach water
    Sandra L McLellan
    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Great Lakes WATER Institute, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 70:4658-65. 2004
    ..Understanding the ecology of indicator bacteria is important when interpreting fecal pollution assessments and developing source detection methodology...
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 53204, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 21:253-9. 2002
    ..These data suggest that induction effects of components of complex mixtures may be as important as competitive metabolism when assessing the ability of bacteria to effectively degrade high-molecular-weight PAHs in the environment...
  7. ncbi request reprint Evidence for localized bacterial loading as the cause of chronic beach closings in a freshwater marina
    S L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Water Res 37:2700-8. 2003
    ..We conclude that beach water quality may be impacted by local, persistent contamination, which may confound routine beach monitoring and prevent the detection of regional pollution from other sources...
  8. pmc Genetic characterization of Escherichia coli populations from host sources of fecal pollution by using DNA fingerprinting
    Sandra L McLellan
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:2587-94. 2003
    ..coli strain diversity found in host sources of contamination. These findings will assist in the development of approaches to determine sources of fecal pollution, an effort important for protecting water resources and public health...
  9. doi request reprint Reliability of mCP method for identification of Clostridium perfringens from faecal polluted aquatic environments
    S R Mueller-Spitz
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    J Appl Microbiol 108:1994-2002. 2010
    ..The purpose of the work was to evaluate the mCP method to correctly identify and enumerate Clostridium perfringens that are present in surface waters impacted by a mixture of faecal pollution sources...
  10. pmc Acinetobacter, Aeromonas and Trichococcus populations dominate the microbial community within urban sewer infrastructure
    J L Vandewalle
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Environ Microbiol 14:2538-52. 2012
    ..This work provides insight into microbial community composition and dynamics within the defined environment of urban sewer infrastructure...
  11. pmc Detection of genetic markers of fecal indicator bacteria in Lake Michigan and determination of their relationship to Escherichia coli densities using standard microbiological methods
    Patricia A Bower
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:8305-13. 2005
    ..coli levels were below 235 CFU/100 ml. This study demonstrates the usefulness of non-culture-based microbial-source tracking approaches and the prevalence of these genetic markers in the Great Lakes, including freshwater coastal beaches...
  12. ncbi request reprint The potential for beach sand to serve as a reservoir for Escherichia coli and the physical influences on cell die-off
    L J Beversdorf
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    J Appl Microbiol 102:1372-81. 2007
    ..coli, and if there was evidence of cell replication in situ. Field and laboratory studies investigated the effects of moisture, temperature and UV on E. coli densities in the sand...
  13. pmc Freshwater suspended sediments and sewage are reservoirs for enterotoxin-positive Clostridium perfringens
    Sabrina R Mueller-Spitz
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:5556-62. 2010
    ..This work presents evidence that freshwater suspended sediments and sewage influent are reservoirs for potentially pathogenic cpe-carrying C. perfringens spores...
  14. pmc Microbial communities and fecal indicator bacteria associated with Cladophora mats on beach sites along Lake Michigan shores
    Ola A Olapade
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 72:1932-8. 2006
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Temporal and spatial variability in nearshore bacterioplankton communities of Lake Michigan
    Sabrina R Mueller-Spitz
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 67:511-22. 2009
    ..The nearshore waters of Lake Michigan are a dynamic environment that experience forces similar to the coastal ocean environment and share common bacterial diversity with other freshwater habitats...
  16. doi request reprint Water use and acute diarrhoeal illness in children in a United States metropolitan area
    M H Gorelick
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
    Epidemiol Infect 139:295-301. 2011
    ..We conclude that well-water use and bottled-water use are associated with increased odds of ADI in children...
  17. pmc Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroidales alternative fecal indicators reveal chronic human sewage contamination in an urban harbor
    Ryan J Newton
    Great Lakes WATER Institute, School of Freshwater Sciences, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 77:6972-81. 2011
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Delineation of a chemical and biological signature for stormwater pollution in an urban river
    Alissa K Salmore
    University of Wisconsin System Great Lakes WATER Institute, Milwaukee 53204, USA
    J Water Health 4:247-62. 2006
    ..The results of this study demonstrate that there is a considerable E. coli load to receiving waters from stormwater and that sanitary sewage inputs may not be limited to recognized sewer overflows...
  19. ncbi request reprint Non-point source pollution: determination of replication versus persistence of Escherichia coli in surface water and sediments with correlation of levels to readily measurable environmental parameters
    Julie Kinzelman
    City of Racine Health Department, Racine, WI 53403, USA
    J Water Health 2:103-14. 2004
    ..coli from foreshore sands to surface waters via wave action, was found to be a major contributor to poor recreational water quality at the Lake Michigan beaches involved in this study...

Research Grants2

  1. Detection of Pathogens in Avian Fecal Pollution
    SANDRA MCLELLAN; Fiscal Year: 2003
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