Craig P McGowan

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Independent effects of weight and mass on plantar flexor activity during walking: implications for their contributions to body support and forward propulsion
    C P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Appl Physiol 105:486-94. 2008
  2. pmc A phenomenological model and validation of shortening-induced force depression during muscle contractions
    Craig P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Biomech 43:449-54. 2010
  3. pmc Modular control of human walking: Adaptations to altered mechanical demands
    Craig P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Biomech 43:412-9. 2010
  4. pmc Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward propulsion during walking
    C P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0292, USA
    J Biomech 42:850-6. 2009
  5. pmc Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Anat 212:153-63. 2008
  6. pmc Forward dynamics simulations provide insight into muscle mechanical work during human locomotion
    Richard R Neptune
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 37:203-10. 2009
  7. doi request reprint The influence of muscle physiology and advanced technology on sports performance
    Richard R Neptune
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:81-107. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Modulation of proximal muscle function during level versus incline hopping in tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii)
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:1255-65. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Differential design for hopping in two species of wallabies
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 150:151-8. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint The mechanics of jumping versus steady hopping in yellow-footed rock wallabies
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 208:2741-51. 2005

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Independent effects of weight and mass on plantar flexor activity during walking: implications for their contributions to body support and forward propulsion
    C P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Appl Physiol 105:486-94. 2008
    ..Therefore, we accepted the hypothesis that Sol and Gas contribute to body support, whereas Sol is the primary contributor to forward trunk propulsion...
  2. pmc A phenomenological model and validation of shortening-induced force depression during muscle contractions
    Craig P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Biomech 43:449-54. 2010
    ..However, to fully understand the impact of this phenomenon on human movement, more research is needed to characterize the relationship between force depression and mechanical work in large muscles with different morphologies...
  3. pmc Modular control of human walking: Adaptations to altered mechanical demands
    Craig P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Biomech 43:412-9. 2010
    ..These results support the idea that the nervous system may use a modular control strategy and that flexible modulation of module recruitment intensity may be sufficient to meet large changes in mechanical demand...
  4. pmc Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward propulsion during walking
    C P McGowan
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0292, USA
    J Biomech 42:850-6. 2009
    ..The data also showed that a muscle's contribution to a specific task is likely not independent of its contribution to other tasks (e.g., body support vs. forward propulsion)...
  5. pmc Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
    J Anat 212:153-63. 2008
    ..Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (approximately 250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity...
  6. pmc Forward dynamics simulations provide insight into muscle mechanical work during human locomotion
    Richard R Neptune
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 37:203-10. 2009
    ....
  7. doi request reprint The influence of muscle physiology and advanced technology on sports performance
    Richard R Neptune
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:81-107. 2009
    ..This review discusses the influence of intrinsic muscle properties in sports and how advanced technology can be used to extend the limits of human performance...
  8. ncbi request reprint Modulation of proximal muscle function during level versus incline hopping in tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii)
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:1255-65. 2007
    ..This indicates that other hindlimb muscles, or possibly trunk and back muscles, must contribute substantial work during incline hopping...
  9. ncbi request reprint Differential design for hopping in two species of wallabies
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 150:151-8. 2008
    ..1.26 J in YFRW). This likely reflects the differing demands of the environments inhabited by these two species, where selection for non-steady locomotor performance in rocky terrain likely requires trade-offs in locomotor economy...
  10. ncbi request reprint The mechanics of jumping versus steady hopping in yellow-footed rock wallabies
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 208:2741-51. 2005
    ..Time of contact is maintained during jumping by a substantial extension of the leg, which keeps the foot in contact with the ground...
  11. ncbi request reprint Joint work and power associated with acceleration and deceleration in tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii)
    C P McGowan
    Concord Field Station, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Exp Biol 208:41-53. 2005
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Dynamic pressure maps for wings and tails of pigeons in slow, flapping flight, and their energetic implications
    James R Usherwood
    Concord Field Station, Harvard University, 100 Old Causeway Road, Bedford, MA 01730, USA
    J Exp Biol 208:355-69. 2005
    ..5% of the force required to support weight was provided by the wings, and that the aerodynamic muscle-mass specific power required to flap the wings was 272.7 W kg(-1)...
  13. pmc Effects of load carrying on metabolic cost and hindlimb muscle dynamics in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris)
    C P McGowan
    Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Concord Field Station, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    J Appl Physiol 101:1060-9. 2006
    ..As a result, when averaged for the two muscles, EMG intensity increased in direct proportion to the fractional increase in load carried...
  14. pmc Running-specific prostheses limit ground-force during sprinting
    Alena M Grabowski
    Biomechatronics Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Biol Lett 6:201-4. 2010
    ..We infer that RSP impair force generation and thus probably limit top speed. Some elite unilateral trans-tibial amputee sprinters appear to have learned or trained to compensate for AL force impairment by swinging both legs rapidly...