Joel W McGlothlin

Summary

Affiliation: University of Virginia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Natural selection on testosterone production in a wild songbird population
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Am Nat 175:687-701. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Combining selective episodes to estimate lifetime nonlinear selection
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Evolution 64:1377-85. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Interacting phenotypes and the evolutionary process. III. Social evolution
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
    Evolution 64:2558-74. 2010
  4. doi request reprint How to measure indirect genetic effects: the congruence of trait-based and variance-partitioning approaches
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia 22902, USA
    Evolution 63:1785-95. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Natural variation in a testosterone-mediated trade-off between mating effort and parental effort
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Am Nat 170:864-75. 2007
  6. pmc Hormone-mediated suites as adaptations and evolutionary constraints
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1611-20. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Hormones and honest signals: males with larger ornaments elevate testosterone more when challenged
    J W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    J Evol Biol 21:39-48. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Seasonal and individual variation in response to GnRH challenge in male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis)
    Jodie M Jawor
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 149:182-9. 2006
  9. pmc Promiscuous mating produces offspring with higher lifetime fitness
    Nicole M Gerlach
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 279:860-6. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Phenotypic assortment mediates the effect of social selection in a wild beetle population
    Vincent A Formica
    Mountain Lake Biological Station, Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Evolution 65:2771-81. 2011

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. doi request reprint Natural selection on testosterone production in a wild songbird population
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Am Nat 175:687-701. 2010
    ..Our data represent the most complete demonstration of natural selection on hormones via multiple fitness components, and they complement previous experiments to illuminate testosterone's role in the evolution of life-history trade-offs...
  2. doi request reprint Combining selective episodes to estimate lifetime nonlinear selection
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Evolution 64:1377-85. 2010
    ..The equations derived here are easily applicable to empirical data, as is illustrated both with a simulated dataset and with a reanalysis of a study of quadratic selection in dark-eyed juncos...
  3. doi request reprint Interacting phenotypes and the evolutionary process. III. Social evolution
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
    Evolution 64:2558-74. 2010
    ..The parameters can be measured empirically, and we emphasize the importance of considering both IGEs and social selection, in addition to relatedness, when testing hypotheses about social evolution...
  4. doi request reprint How to measure indirect genetic effects: the congruence of trait-based and variance-partitioning approaches
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville Virginia 22902, USA
    Evolution 63:1785-95. 2009
    ..This method can be used in a very general set of circumstances and is widely applicable to all IGEs, including maternal effects and other interactions among relatives...
  5. doi request reprint Natural variation in a testosterone-mediated trade-off between mating effort and parental effort
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Am Nat 170:864-75. 2007
    ..We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of hormonally mediated trade-offs...
  6. pmc Hormone-mediated suites as adaptations and evolutionary constraints
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1611-20. 2008
    ..We conclude that future work on hormone-mediated suites, if motivated by quantitative genetic theory, may provide important insights into their dual roles as adaptations and evolutionary constraints...
  7. ncbi request reprint Hormones and honest signals: males with larger ornaments elevate testosterone more when challenged
    J W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    J Evol Biol 21:39-48. 2008
    ..We suggest that the association between tail white and testosterone increases may allow conspecifics to assess potential mates and competitors reliably using tail white...
  8. ncbi request reprint Seasonal and individual variation in response to GnRH challenge in male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis)
    Jodie M Jawor
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 149:182-9. 2006
    ..Such repeatability suggests that hormonal plasticity might evolve in response to changing selection pressures...
  9. pmc Promiscuous mating produces offspring with higher lifetime fitness
    Nicole M Gerlach
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 279:860-6. 2012
    ..Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that the evolution of extra-pair mating by females is favoured by indirect benefits and shows that such benefits accrue much later in the offspring's life than previously documented...
  10. doi request reprint Phenotypic assortment mediates the effect of social selection in a wild beetle population
    Vincent A Formica
    Mountain Lake Biological Station, Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Evolution 65:2771-81. 2011
    ..Our results demonstrate multilevel selection in nature and stress the importance of considering social selection whenever conspecific interactions occur nonrandomly...
  11. doi request reprint Contribution of direct and maternal genetic effects to life-history evolution
    Laura F Galloway
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 4328, USA
    New Phytol 183:826-38. 2009
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Phenotypic integration and independence: Hormones, performance, and response to environmental change
    Ellen D Ketterson
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 49:365-79. 2009
    ..Most attention is devoted to the hormone testosterone (T) and a songbird species, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis)...
  13. ncbi request reprint Correlational selection leads to genetic integration of body size and an attractive plumage trait in dark-eyed juncos
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Evolution 59:658-71. 2005
    ....
  14. pmc Elevated testosterone reduces choosiness in female dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis): evidence for a hormonal constraint on sexual selection?
    Joel W McGlothlin
    Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Box 351634, Station B, Nashville, TN 36235, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1377-84. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that hormonal correlations between the sexes have the potential to constrain sexual selection on males...