Loren McClenachan

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Documenting loss of large trophy fish from the Florida Keys with historical photographs
    Loren McClenachan
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 0208, USA
    Conserv Biol 23:636-43. 2009
  2. pmc Extinction rate, historical population structure and ecological role of the Caribbean monk seal
    Loren McClenachan
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 0208, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1351-8. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Global trajectories of the long-term decline of coral reef ecosystems
    John M Pandolfi
    Department of Paleobiology, MRC 121, National Museum of Natural History, Post Office Box 37012, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013 7012, USA
    Science 301:955-8. 2003

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. doi request reprint Documenting loss of large trophy fish from the Florida Keys with historical photographs
    Loren McClenachan
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 0208, USA
    Conserv Biol 23:636-43. 2009
    ....
  2. pmc Extinction rate, historical population structure and ecological role of the Caribbean monk seal
    Loren McClenachan
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 0208, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:1351-8. 2008
    ..Realistic reconstruction of these past ecosystems is critical to understanding the profound and long-lasting effect of human hunting on the functioning of coral reef ecosystems...
  3. ncbi request reprint Global trajectories of the long-term decline of coral reef ecosystems
    John M Pandolfi
    Department of Paleobiology, MRC 121, National Museum of Natural History, Post Office Box 37012, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013 7012, USA
    Science 301:955-8. 2003
    ..All reefs were substantially degraded long before outbreaks of coral disease and bleaching. Regardless of these new threats, reefs will not survive without immediate protection from human exploitation over large spatial scales...