G E Legge

Summary

Affiliation: University of Minnesota
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading. XX. Linking letter recognition to reading speed in central and peripheral vision
    G E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, University of Minnesota, 75 East River Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vision Res 41:725-43. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Mr. Chips: an ideal-observer model of reading
    G E Legge
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Psychol Rev 104:524-53. 1997
  3. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading--XVI. The visual span in normal and low vision
    G E Legge
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Vision Res 37:1999-2010. 1997
  4. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading. XVIII. The effect of print size on reading speed in normal peripheral vision
    S T Chung
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Vision Res 38:2949-62. 1998
  5. ncbi request reprint Reading with a head-mounted video magnifier
    A Ortiz
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Optom Vis Sci 76:755-63. 1999
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of contrast on reading speed in dyslexia
    B A O'Brien
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
    Vision Res 40:1921-35. 2000
  7. pmc Retention of high tactile acuity throughout the life span in blindness
    Gordon E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
    Percept Psychophys 70:1471-88. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Lost in virtual space: studies in human and ideal spatial navigation
    Brian J Stankiewicz
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 32:688-704. 2006
  9. pmc The case for the visual span as a sensory bottleneck in reading
    Gordon E Legge
    University of Minnesota, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Vis 7:9.1-15. 2007
  10. pmc Variability in stepping direction explains the veering behavior of blind walkers
    Christopher S Kallie
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 33:183-200. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading. XX. Linking letter recognition to reading speed in central and peripheral vision
    G E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, University of Minnesota, 75 East River Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vision Res 41:725-43. 2001
    ..We conclude that spatiotemporal characteristics of the visual span limit RSVP reading speed in central vision, and that shrinkage of the visual span results in slower reading in peripheral vision...
  2. ncbi request reprint Mr. Chips: an ideal-observer model of reading
    G E Legge
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Psychol Rev 104:524-53. 1997
    ..For example, Mr. Chips sometimes plans a saccade that places a decisive letter in a scotoma. This article provides the first quantitative model of the effects of scotomas on reading...
  3. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading--XVI. The visual span in normal and low vision
    G E Legge
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Vision Res 37:1999-2010. 1997
    ..RSVP measurements for six out of seven low-vision subjects revealed a strong dependence of reading time on word length, as expected from reduced visual spans...
  4. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading. XVIII. The effect of print size on reading speed in normal peripheral vision
    S T Chung
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Vision Res 38:2949-62. 1998
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Reading with a head-mounted video magnifier
    A Ortiz
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA
    Optom Vis Sci 76:755-63. 1999
    ..This study compared the effectiveness of a head-mounted video magnifier, low-vision enhancement system (LVES), with closed-circuit TV (CCTV) and large print as a device or means of improving reading performance in people with low vision...
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of contrast on reading speed in dyslexia
    B A O'Brien
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
    Vision Res 40:1921-35. 2000
    ..We conclude that earlier findings of group differences in contrast effects on grating detection or visual search tasks do not generalize to reading...
  7. pmc Retention of high tactile acuity throughout the life span in blindness
    Gordon E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
    Percept Psychophys 70:1471-88. 2008
    ..We propose that blind people's use of active touch in daily activities, not specifically braille reading, results in preservation of tactile acuity across the life span...
  8. ncbi request reprint Lost in virtual space: studies in human and ideal spatial navigation
    Brian J Stankiewicz
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 0187, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 32:688-704. 2006
    ..The authors investigated whether this reduction in navigation efficiency was due to visual perception (Experiment 2), memory, spatial updating strategy, or decision strategy (Experiment 3)...
  9. pmc The case for the visual span as a sensory bottleneck in reading
    Gordon E Legge
    University of Minnesota, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Vis 7:9.1-15. 2007
    ..Evidence for the visual span as a determinant of reading speed implies the existence of a bottom-up, sensory limitation on reading, distinct from attentional, motor, or linguistic influences...
  10. pmc Variability in stepping direction explains the veering behavior of blind walkers
    Christopher S Kallie
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 33:183-200. 2007
    ....
  11. pmc Relationship between slow visual processing and reading speed in people with macular degeneration
    Allen M Y Cheong
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vision Res 47:2943-55. 2007
    ..We hypothesized that slower temporal processing of visual patterns in peripheral vision is a factor contributing to slow reading performance in MD patients...
  12. pmc Visual accessibility of ramps and steps
    Gordon E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Vis 10:8. 2010
    ..Cues associated with the height in the picture plane of the targets were more robust...
  13. pmc Relationship between visual span and reading performance in age-related macular degeneration
    Allen M Y Cheong
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, University of Minnesota, Department of Psychology, 75 East River Road, N218 Elliott Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vision Res 48:577-88. 2008
    ..Vision Research, 47, 2943-2965]. We measured the visual-span profiles of AMD subjects and assessed the relationship of the spatial and temporal properties of these profiles to reading speed...
  14. pmc Functional and cortical adaptations to central vision loss
    Sing hang Cheung
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vis Neurosci 22:187-201. 2005
    ..The purpose of this review is to summarize key findings on both the clinical and neuroscience issues related to questions about visual adaptation in AMD patients...
  15. pmc Learning building layouts with non-geometric visual information: the effects of visual impairment and age
    Amy A Kalia
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, N218 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Perception 37:1677-99. 2008
    ..In conclusion, visual impairment and age may result in reduced perceptual and/or memory processing that makes it difficult to learn layouts without non-geometric visual information...
  16. ncbi request reprint Is word recognition different in central and peripheral vision?
    Hye Won Lee
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Vision Res 43:2837-46. 2003
    ..We conclude that lexical processing is slower in peripheral vision, but the quality of lexical processing is similar in central and peripheral vision...
  17. ncbi request reprint Preneural limitations on letter identification in central and peripheral vision
    Paul J Beckmann
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55455, USA
    J Opt Soc Am A Opt Image Sci Vis 19:2349-62. 2002
    ..The increasing performance gap between human and ideal-observer performance with eccentricity implicates an increasing role of neural limitations with eccentricity in limiting human letter identification...
  18. ncbi request reprint Mr. Chips 2002: new insights from an ideal-observer model of reading
    Gordon E Legge
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN55455, USA
    Vision Res 42:2219-234. 2002
    ..Overall, our findings show that many of the complicated aspects of human reading saccades can be explained concisely by early information-processing constraints...
  19. pmc Adaptive changes in visual cortex following prolonged contrast reduction
    MiYoung Kwon
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
    J Vis 9:20.1-16. 2009
    ..The adaptation appears to be compensatory, such that the precision of contrast coding is improved for low retinal-image contrasts...
  20. pmc Do image descriptions underlie word recognition in reading?
    Gordon E Legge
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
    Br J Psychol 101:33-9; author reply 41-6. 2010
    ..This article is a commentary on 'The utility of image descriptions in the initial stages of vision: A case study of printed text' (Watt & Dakin, 2010)...
  21. pmc Incomplete cortical reorganization in macular degeneration
    Tingting Liu
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 51:6826-34. 2010
    ..from other retinal loci at the same eccentricity? What effect does the role of age of onset and etiology of MD have on cortical responses? How do functional responses in an MD subject's visual cortex vary for task and stimulus conditions?..
  22. pmc Effect of letter spacing on visual span and reading speed
    Deyue Yu
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    J Vis 7:2.1-10. 2007
    ..These results are consistent with the view that the size of the visual span is a primary visual factor that limits reading speed...
  23. ncbi request reprint Psychophysics of reading--XIV. The page navigation problem in using magnifiers
    P J Beckmann
    Minnesota Laboratory for Low Vision Research, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455 0344, USA
    Vision Res 36:3723-33. 1996
    ..The difference was more than a factor of three for normal-vision subjects and close to a factor of two for low-vision subjects (10 characters for CCTV vs 5.2 characters for drifting-text for 85% of maximum reading speed...
  24. ncbi request reprint Low-vision reading speed: influences of linguistic inference and aging
    Sarah M Sass
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
    Optom Vis Sci 83:166-77. 2006
    ..Given evidence for age-related differences in some forms of cognitive processing, we also investigated the effect of age...
  25. ncbi request reprint Invariant recognition of natural objects in the presence of shadows
    W L Braje
    Department of Psychology, Plattsburgh State University, NY 12901, USA
    Perception 29:383-98. 2000
    ..These studies show that recognition of natural objects is highly invariant to the complex luminance patterns caused by shadows...
  26. ncbi request reprint Wayfinding with words: spatial learning and navigation using dynamically updated verbal descriptions
    Nicholas A Giudice
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Office Bldg 551, Room 2226, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 9660, USA
    Psychol Res 71:347-58. 2007
    ..However, the model performed more like human participants after adding a constraint that biased it against reversing direction...
  27. doi request reprint Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling of MNREAD data
    Sing hang Cheung
    Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49:828-35. 2008
    ..The authors demonstrate the application of NLME by analyzing data from the MNREAD, a continuous-text reading-acuity chart...
  28. pmc Letter-recognition and reading speed in peripheral vision benefit from perceptual learning
    Susana T L Chung
    College of Optometry, University of Houston, 505 J D Armistead Bldg, Houston, TX 77204 2020, USA
    Vision Res 44:695-709. 2004
    ..Our results are consistent with the view that the visual span is a bottleneck on reading speed, but a bottleneck that can be increased with practice...
  29. ncbi request reprint Spatial-frequency characteristics of letter identification in central and peripheral vision
    Susana T L Chung
    College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA
    Vision Res 42:2137-152. 2002
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Spatial-frequency properties of letter identification in amblyopia
    Susana T L Chung
    School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Vision Res 42:1571-81. 2002
    ..Rather, it is a consequence of the difference in the resolution limit between the amblyopic and the non-amblyopic eyes...