Alan Lambowitz

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Gene targeting using randomly inserted group II introns (targetrons) recovered from an Escherichia coli gene disruption library
    Jun Yao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 33:3351-62. 2005
  2. pmc Group II intron-based gene targeting reactions in eukaryotes
    Marta Mastroianni
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e3121. 2008
  3. pmc The retrohoming of linear group II intron RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster occurs by both DNA ligase 4-dependent and -independent mechanisms
    Travis B White
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
    PLoS Genet 8:e1002534. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Mobile group II introns
    Alan M Lambowitz
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Texas at Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 38:1-35. 2004
  5. pmc Group II introns: mobile ribozymes that invade DNA
    Alan M Lambowitz
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 3:a003616. 2011
  6. pmc Function of the C-terminal domain of the DEAD-box protein Mss116p analyzed in vivo and in vitro
    Georg Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 375:1344-64. 2008
  7. pmc Involvement of DEAD-box proteins in group I and group II intron splicing. Biochemical characterization of Mss116p, ATP hydrolysis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and general RNA chaperone activity
    Coralie Halls
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 365:835-55. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Binding of a group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase/maturase to its high affinity intron RNA binding site involves sequence-specific recognition and autoregulates translation
    Ravindra N Singh
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 318:287-303. 2002
  9. pmc Unwinding by local strand separation is critical for the function of DEAD-box proteins as RNA chaperones
    Mark Del Campo
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 389:674-93. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Structure of a tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase splicing factor bound to a group I intron RNA
    Paul J Paukstelis
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Nature 451:94-7. 2008

Collaborators

  • Manabu Matsuura
  • Quentin Vicens
  • Xiaoxia Cui
  • Rick Russell
  • John Wallingford
  • Ravindra Singh
  • R P Novick
  • T R Cech
  • PHILIP PERLMAN
  • E Westhof
  • Barbara L Golden
  • Bruce A Sullenger
  • ANNA MARIE contact PYLE
  • Nicolas Toro
  • Sabine Mohr
  • Mark Del Campo
  • Jun Yao
  • Georg Mohr
  • Paul J Paukstelis
  • Jin Zhong
  • Fanglei Zhuang
  • Jiri Perutka
  • Eckhard Jankowsky
  • Quansheng Yang
  • Travis B White
  • Junhua Zhao
  • James W Noah
  • Shan Qing Gu
  • Hon Ren Huang
  • Marta Mastroianni
  • Joseph San Filippo
  • Forrest J H Blocker
  • Kazuo Watanabe
  • Marlene Belfort
  • Huijue Jia
  • Lixin Dai
  • Pilar Tijerina
  • Jacob K Grohman
  • Coralie Halls
  • Yue Jiang
  • Hari Bhaskaran
  • Michael Karberg
  • Colin J Coros
  • John Patrick Jones
  • Dorie Smith
  • Xin Chen
  • Courtney L Frazier
  • Yasunori Aizawa
  • Estefanía Muñoz-Adelantado
  • Christopher A Myers
  • Eman Ghanem
  • Sijiong Mou
  • Dinggeng Chai
  • Elaine Chase
  • Edward M Marcotte
  • Steven Zimmerly
  • Jesse Gabel
  • Jui Hui Chen
  • Jamie Vernon
  • Wei Niu
  • Sergei Y Noskov
  • Edward Geisinger
  • Jacob T Whitt
  • Yuan Fang
  • Wolfgang Frey
  • Soyeun Park
  • Li Qi
  • Arthur Beauregard
  • Robert Coon
  • Robert G Coon
  • Monique N Kierlin
  • Arthur Monzingo
  • Lori H Conlan
  • Jacek Nowakowski
  • Lakshmi Madabusi
  • Markus Landthaler
  • Carol Lyn Piazza
  • Jon Robertus
  • Donna Esposito
  • Claire E Rowe
  • David Goerlitz
  • Wenjun Wang
  • Yong Wang
  • David A Mills
  • Barbara Armstrong
  • Michael Y Chao
  • Francisco Martinez-Abarca
  • Fernando M García-Rodríguez
  • Qing Xiang
  • John M Stryker

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. pmc Gene targeting using randomly inserted group II introns (targetrons) recovered from an Escherichia coli gene disruption library
    Jun Yao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 33:3351-62. 2005
    ..All such introns tested individually gave the desired specific disruption, some by switching to an alternate retrohoming mechanism targeting single-stranded DNA and using a nascent lagging DNA strand to prime reverse transcription...
  2. pmc Group II intron-based gene targeting reactions in eukaryotes
    Marta Mastroianni
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e3121. 2008
    ..Thus far, however, efficient group II intron-based gene targeting reactions have not been demonstrated in eukaryotes...
  3. pmc The retrohoming of linear group II intron RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster occurs by both DNA ligase 4-dependent and -independent mechanisms
    Travis B White
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
    PLoS Genet 8:e1002534. 2012
    ..Additionally, our results reveal novel activities of group II intron reverse transcriptases, with implications for retrohoming mechanisms and potential biotechnological applications...
  4. ncbi request reprint Mobile group II introns
    Alan M Lambowitz
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Texas at Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 38:1-35. 2004
    ..Finally, we describe the development of mobile group II introns into gene-targeting vectors, "targetrons," which have programmable target specificity...
  5. pmc Group II introns: mobile ribozymes that invade DNA
    Alan M Lambowitz
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 3:a003616. 2011
    ..Further, their ribozyme-based DNA integration mechanism enabled the development of group II introns into gene targeting vectors ("targetrons"), which have the unique feature of readily programmable DNA target specificity...
  6. pmc Function of the C-terminal domain of the DEAD-box protein Mss116p analyzed in vivo and in vitro
    Georg Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 375:1344-64. 2008
    ....
  7. pmc Involvement of DEAD-box proteins in group I and group II intron splicing. Biochemical characterization of Mss116p, ATP hydrolysis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and general RNA chaperone activity
    Coralie Halls
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 365:835-55. 2007
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Binding of a group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase/maturase to its high affinity intron RNA binding site involves sequence-specific recognition and autoregulates translation
    Ravindra N Singh
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 318:287-303. 2002
    ..The recognition of the DIVa loop-stem-loop structure accounts, in part, for the intron specificity of group II intron maturases and has parallels in template-recognition mechanisms used by other reverse transcriptases...
  9. pmc Unwinding by local strand separation is critical for the function of DEAD-box proteins as RNA chaperones
    Mark Del Campo
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 389:674-93. 2009
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Structure of a tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase splicing factor bound to a group I intron RNA
    Paul J Paukstelis
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Nature 451:94-7. 2008
    ....
  11. pmc Genetic identification of potential RNA-binding regions in a group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase
    Shan Qing Gu
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 0159, USA
    RNA 16:732-47. 2010
    ..Features of this model may be relevant to evolutionarily related non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR)-retrotransposon RTs...
  12. pmc Group II intron mobility using nascent strands at DNA replication forks to prime reverse transcription
    Jin Zhong
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular, Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University ofTexas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    EMBO J 22:4555-65. 2003
    ..This mechanism connecting intron mobility to target DNA replication may be used by group II intron species that encode proteins lacking the C-terminal DNA endonuclease domain and for group II intron retrotransposition to ectopic sites...
  13. pmc Toward predicting self-splicing and protein-facilitated splicing of group I introns
    Quentin Vicens
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boulder, Colorado 80309 0215, USA
    RNA 14:2013-29. 2008
    ..Together, correlations between sequence, predicted structure and splicing begin to establish rules that should facilitate our ability to predict the self-splicing activity of any group I intron from its sequence...
  14. pmc Targeted and random bacterial gene disruption using a group II intron (targetron) vector containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker
    Jin Zhong
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 31:1656-64. 2003
    ..This insertional bias likely reflects at least in part the higher copy number of origin proximal genes, but interaction with the replication machinery or other features of DNA structure or packaging may also contribute...
  15. pmc Linear group II intron RNAs can retrohome in eukaryotes and may use nonhomologous end-joining for cDNA ligation
    Fanglei Zhuang
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:18189-94. 2009
    ....
  16. pmc A bacterial group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase localizes to cellular poles
    Junhua Zhao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:16133-40. 2005
    ..coli chromosome, may facilitate access to exposed DNA in these regions, and could potentially link group II intron mobility to the host DNA replication and/or cell division machinery...
  17. pmc A DEAD-box protein alone promotes group II intron splicing and reverse splicing by acting as an RNA chaperone
    Sabine Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:3569-74. 2006
    ..More generally, our results provide additional evidence for the widespread role of RNA chaperones in folding cellular RNAs...
  18. pmc Use of targetrons to disrupt essential and nonessential genes in Staphylococcus aureus reveals temperature sensitivity of Ll.LtrB group II intron splicing
    Jun Yao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712, USA
    RNA 12:1271-81. 2006
    ..In nature, temperature sensitivity of group II intron splicing could limit the temperature range of an organism containing a group II intron inserted in an essential gene...
  19. pmc EcI5, a group IIB intron with high retrohoming frequency: DNA target site recognition and use in gene targeting
    Fanglei Zhuang
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    RNA 15:432-49. 2009
    ..More generally, they show how the diversity of mobile group II introns can be exploited to provide a large variety of different target specificities and potentially other useful properties for gene targeting...
  20. pmc Gene targeting in gram-negative bacteria by use of a mobile group II intron ("Targetron") expressed from a broad-host-range vector
    Jun Yao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A4800, 2500 Speedway, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2735-43. 2007
    ..coli lacZ, P. aeruginosa pqsA and pqsH, and A. tumefaciens aopB and chvI genes. The development of this broad-host-range system for targetron expression should facilitate gene targeting in many bacteria...
  21. pmc Do DEAD-box proteins promote group II intron splicing without unwinding RNA?
    Mark Del Campo
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Mol Cell 28:159-66. 2007
    ..Our findings favor the hypothesis that DEAD-box proteins function in group II intron splicing as in other processes by using their unwinding activity to act as RNA chaperones...
  22. pmc Identification and evolution of fungal mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases with group I intron splicing activity
    Paul J Paukstelis
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:6010-5. 2008
    ..The unique group I intron splicing activity of these fungal enzymes may provide a new target for antifungal drugs...
  23. ncbi request reprint A group II intron-encoded maturase functions preferentially in cis and requires both the reverse transcriptase and X domains to promote RNA splicing
    Xiaoxia Cui
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular, Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 340:211-31. 2004
    ..Our results support the hypothesis that the intron-encoded protein adapted to function in splicing by using, at least in part, interactions used initially to recognize the intron RNA as a template for reverse transcription...
  24. pmc Putative proteins related to group II intron reverse transcriptase/maturases are encoded by nuclear genes in higher plants
    Georg Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 31:647-52. 2003
    ..Nuclear-encoded maturases could regulate organellar gene expression and may reflect a step in the evolution of mobile group II introns into spliceosomal introns...
  25. ncbi request reprint Effects of maturase binding and Mg2+ concentration on group II intron RNA folding investigated by UV cross-linking
    James W Noah
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Biochemistry 42:12466-80. 2003
    ..This and other cross-links provide new constraints for three-dimensional structural modeling of the group II intron catalytic core...
  26. ncbi request reprint A tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase adapted to function in group I intron splicing by acquiring a new RNA binding surface
    Paul J Paukstelis
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Mol Cell 17:417-28. 2005
    ..Our results show how essential proteins can progressively evolve new functions...
  27. pmc Domain structure and three-dimensional model of a group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase
    Forrest J H Blocker
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A4800, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    RNA 11:14-28. 2005
    ..These regions potentially comprise an extended RNA-binding surface that interacts with different regions of the intron for RNA splicing and reverse transcription...
  28. pmc High-affinity binding site for a group II intron-encoded reverse transcriptase/maturase within a stem-loop structure in the intron RNA
    Kazuo Watanabe
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    RNA 10:1433-43. 2004
    ..The nature of the maturase/DIVa interaction and its role in translational regulation are reminiscent of the coat protein/RNA hairpin interactions of single-stranded RNA phages...
  29. ncbi request reprint A DEAD-box protein functions as an ATP-dependent RNA chaperone in group I intron splicing
    Sabine Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 78712, USA
    Cell 109:769-79. 2002
    ..Our results demonstrate that a DExH/D-box protein has a specific, physiologically relevant chaperone function in the folding of a natural RNA substrate...
  30. pmc The Neurospora crassa CYT-18 protein C-terminal RNA-binding domain helps stabilize interdomain tertiary interactions in group I introns
    Xin Chen
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    RNA 10:634-44. 2004
    ..Our results indicate that different structural mutations in group I intron RNAs can result in dependence on different regions of CYT-18 for RNA splicing...
  31. pmc tRNA-like recognition of group I introns by a tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase
    Christopher A Myers
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:2630-5. 2002
    ..Our results support the hypothesis that CYT-18 and other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with group I introns by recognizing conserved tRNA-like structural features of the intron RNAs...
  32. ncbi request reprint Use of computer-designed group II introns to disrupt Escherichia coli DExH/D-box protein and DNA helicase genes
    Jiri Perutka
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular, Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 336:421-39. 2004
    ..coli DExH/D-box protein and DNA helicase disruptants should be useful for analyzing the function of these proteins...
  33. ncbi request reprint Characterization of the C-terminal DNA-binding/DNA endonuclease region of a group II intron-encoded protein
    Joseph San Filippo
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular, Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, MBB2 234BA, 2500 Speedway, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Biol 324:933-51. 2002
    ....
  34. pmc Probing the mechanisms of DEAD-box proteins as general RNA chaperones: the C-terminal domain of CYT-19 mediates general recognition of RNA
    Jacob K Grohman
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Biochemistry 46:3013-22. 2007
    ..Many other DExD/H-box proteins also contain arginine-rich ancillary domains, and some of these domains may function similarly as nonspecific RNA-binding elements that enhance general RNA chaperone activity...
  35. pmc Atomic force microscopy reveals DNA bending during group II intron ribonucleoprotein particle integration into double-stranded DNA
    James W Noah
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 0159, USA
    Biochemistry 45:12424-35. 2006
    ..Our findings indicate that bendability of the DNA target site is a significant factor for Ll.LtrB RNP integration...
  36. pmc Mechanisms used for genomic proliferation by thermophilic group II introns
    Georg Mohr
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
    PLoS Biol 8:e1000391. 2010
    ..We also identify actively mobile thermophilic introns, which may be useful for structural studies, gene targeting in thermophiles, and as a source of thermostable reverse transcriptases...
  37. pmc Group II intron protein localization and insertion sites are affected by polyphosphate
    Junhua Zhao
    Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 6:e150. 2008
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Retrotransposition strategies of the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron are dictated by host identity and cellular environment
    Colin J Coros
    Molecular Genetics Program, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Center for Medical Sciences, 150 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, NY 12201 2002, USA
    Mol Microbiol 56:509-24. 2005
    ..Additionally, growth conditions affect the insertion pattern. We propose a model in which DNA replication, compactness of the nucleoid and chromosomal localization influence target site preference...
  39. pmc Recruitment of host functions suggests a repair pathway for late steps in group II intron retrohoming
    Dorie Smith
    Molecular Genetics Program, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12201, USA
    Genes Dev 19:2477-87. 2005
    ..The completion of retrohoming is viewed as a DNA repair process, with features that may be shared by other non-LTR retroelements...
  40. pmc The DIVa maturase binding site in the yeast group II intron aI2 is essential for intron homing but not for in vivo splicing
    Hon Ren Huang
    Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 9148, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 23:8809-19. 2003
    ..Replacing the DIVa of aI2 with that of the closely related intron aI1 improves in vivo splicing but not homing, indicating that DIVa contributes to the specificity of the maturase-RNA interaction needed for homing...
  41. pmc A three-dimensional model of a group II intron RNA and its interaction with the intron-encoded reverse transcriptase
    Lixin Dai
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
    Mol Cell 30:472-85. 2008
    ..The model also suggests an arrangement of active site elements that may be conserved in the spliceosome...
  42. pmc Genetic manipulation of Lactococcus lactis by using targeted group II introns: generation of stable insertions without selection
    Courtney L Frazier
    Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 8749, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 69:1121-8. 2003
    ..Our findings demonstrate the utility of targeted group II introns as a potential food-grade mechanism for delivery of industrially important traits into the genomes of lactococci...
  43. pmc The splicing of yeast mitochondrial group I and group II introns requires a DEAD-box protein with RNA chaperone function
    Hon Ren Huang
    Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 9148, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:163-8. 2005
    ..Our results suggest that both group I and II introns are prone to kinetic traps in RNA folding in vivo and that the splicing of both types of introns may require DEAD-box proteins that function as RNA chaperones...
  44. ncbi request reprint DEAD-box proteins unwind duplexes by local strand separation
    Quansheng Yang
    Department of Biochemistry, Center for RNA Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
    Mol Cell 28:253-63. 2007
    ..We propose a three-step mechanism in which DEAD-box proteins unwind duplexes as "local strand separators." This unwinding mode is well-suited for local structural changes in complex RNA or RNP assemblies...
  45. ncbi request reprint Mobility of the Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 occurs by reverse splicing into DNA, but requires an unknown reverse transcriptase priming mechanism
    Estefanía Muñoz-Adelantado
    Grupo de Ecología Genética, Estacion Experimental del Zaidin, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Calle Profesor Albareda 1, 18008, Granada, Spain
    J Mol Biol 327:931-43. 2003
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint The pathway for DNA recognition and RNA integration by a group II intron retrotransposon
    Yasunori Aizawa
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Mol Cell 11:795-805. 2003
    ..Group II mobility must therefore depend on the trapping of invasion products, potentially through interaction of the intron-encoded protein with the DNA target and/or initiation of reverse transcription...
  47. ncbi request reprint Retargeting mobile group II introns to repair mutant genes
    John Patrick Jones
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Mol Ther 11:687-94. 2005
    ..These results suggest that these mobile genetic elements represent a novel class of agents for performing targeted genetic repair...

Research Grants24

  1. Group II Intron-Based Gene Targeting Methods for Xenopus
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..It will also be a major step toward our ultimate goal of generalizable group II intron- based gene targeting systems for eukaryotes, with potentially broad applications in genetic engineering, functional genomics, and gene therapy. ..
  2. Involvement of Proteins in Splicing Group I and Group II Introns
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  3. Group II Intron-Based Gene Targeting Methods for Xenopus
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..It will also be a major step toward our ultimate goal of generalizable group II intron- based gene targeting systems for eukaryotes, with potentially broad applications in genetic engineering, functional genomics, and gene therapy. ..
  4. Involvement of Proteins in Splicing Group I and Group II Introns
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  5. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  6. Involvement of Proteins in Splicing Group I and Group II Introns
    Alan M Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  7. Involvement of Proteins in Splicing Group I and Group II Introns
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  8. Involvement of Proteins in Group I + II Intron Splicing
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  9. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan M Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  10. GROUP II INTRON RNA SPLICING AND MOBILITY
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..6) To explore the feasibility of using group II introns as vectors for targeted gene disruption and site-specific DNA insertion in animal cells. ..
  11. GROUP II INTRON RNA SPLICING AND MOBILITY
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..6) To explore the feasibility of using group II introns as vectors for targeted gene disruption and site-specific DNA insertion in animal cells. ..
  12. GROUP II INTRON RNA SPLICING AND MOBILITY
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..6) To explore the feasibility of using group II introns as vectors for targeted gene disruption and site-specific DNA insertion in animal cells. ..
  13. Involvement of Proteins in Group I + II Intron Splicing
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  14. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..4) To develop group I1 intronbased gene targeting methods for eukaryotes, including human cells. ..
  15. Involvement of Proteins in Group I + II Intron Splicing
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  16. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..4) To develop group I1 intronbased gene targeting methods for eukaryotes, including human cells. ..
  17. Involvement of Proteins in Group I + II Intron Splicing
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  18. Involvement of Proteins in Group I + II Intron Splicing
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ....
  19. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..4) To develop group I1 intronbased gene targeting methods for eukaryotes, including human cells. ..
  20. GROUP 11 INTRON RNA SPLICING AND MOBILITY
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..6) To explore the feasibility of using group II introns as vectors for targeted gene disruption and site-specific DNA insertion in animal cells. ..
  21. Group II Intron Mobility and Gene Targeting
    Alan Lambowitz; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..4) To develop group I1 intronbased gene targeting methods for eukaryotes, including human cells. ..