Samuel K Lai

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Drug carrier nanoparticles that penetrate human chronic rhinosinusitis mucus
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Biomaterials 32:6285-90. 2011
  2. pmc Enhancement of airway gene transfer by DNA nanoparticles using a pH-responsive block copolymer of polyethylene glycol and poly-L-lysine
    Nicholas J Boylan
    The Center for Nanomedicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    Biomaterials 33:2361-71. 2012
  3. pmc Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles that rapidly penetrate the human mucus barrier
    Benjamin C Tang
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:19268-73. 2009
  4. pmc Nanoparticles reveal that human cervicovaginal mucus is riddled with pores larger than viruses
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:598-603. 2010
  5. pmc N-acetylcysteine enhances cystic fibrosis sputum penetration and airway gene transfer by highly compacted DNA nanoparticles
    Jung Soo Suk
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA
    Mol Ther 19:1981-9. 2011
  6. pmc Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles with low MW PEG coatings: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo evaluation
    Nicholas J Boylan
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Control Release 157:72-9. 2012
  7. pmc Non-degradative intracellular trafficking of highly compacted polymeric DNA nanoparticles
    Anthony J Kim
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Control Release 158:102-7. 2012
  8. pmc Characterization of the intracellular dynamics of a non-degradative pathway accessed by polymer nanoparticles
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Control Release 125:107-11. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Cancer Therapy: Vaginal Delivery of Paclitaxel via Nanoparticles with Non-Mucoadhesive Surfaces Suppresses Cervical Tumor Growth (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014)
    Ming Yang
    Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA
    Adv Healthc Mater 3:1120. 2014
  10. pmc PEGylation of nanoparticles improves their cytoplasmic transport
    Junghae Suh
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Int J Nanomedicine 2:735-41. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. pmc Drug carrier nanoparticles that penetrate human chronic rhinosinusitis mucus
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Biomaterials 32:6285-90. 2011
    ..Our findings strongly support the development of mucus-penetrating nanomedicines for the treatment of CRS...
  2. pmc Enhancement of airway gene transfer by DNA nanoparticles using a pH-responsive block copolymer of polyethylene glycol and poly-L-lysine
    Nicholas J Boylan
    The Center for Nanomedicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    Biomaterials 33:2361-71. 2012
    ..These results represent an important step toward the rational development of an efficient gene delivery platform for the lungs based on highly compacted DNA nanoparticles...
  3. pmc Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles that rapidly penetrate the human mucus barrier
    Benjamin C Tang
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:19268-73. 2009
    ..Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles capable of overcoming human mucus barriers and providing sustained drug release open significant opportunities for improved drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces...
  4. pmc Nanoparticles reveal that human cervicovaginal mucus is riddled with pores larger than viruses
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:598-603. 2010
    ....
  5. pmc N-acetylcysteine enhances cystic fibrosis sputum penetration and airway gene transfer by highly compacted DNA nanoparticles
    Jung Soo Suk
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA
    Mol Ther 19:1981-9. 2011
    ..Our findings suggest that a promising synthetic nanoparticle gene carrier may transfer genes substantially more effectively to lungs of CF patients if administered following adjuvant mucolytic therapy with NAC or NAC + rhDNase...
  6. pmc Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles with low MW PEG coatings: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo evaluation
    Nicholas J Boylan
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Control Release 157:72-9. 2012
    ..However, all DNA nanoparticle formulations were immobilized in freshly expectorated human CF sputum, likely due to inadequate PEG surface coverage...
  7. pmc Non-degradative intracellular trafficking of highly compacted polymeric DNA nanoparticles
    Anthony J Kim
    Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    J Control Release 158:102-7. 2012
    ..These findings show that highly compacted DNPs employ highly regulated trafficking mechanisms similar to biological pathogens to target specific intracellular compartments...
  8. pmc Characterization of the intracellular dynamics of a non-degradative pathway accessed by polymer nanoparticles
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Control Release 125:107-11. 2008
    ..This non-degradative pathway may prove beneficial for the delivery of therapeutics and nucleic acids to the nucleus or nearby organelles...
  9. ncbi request reprint Cancer Therapy: Vaginal Delivery of Paclitaxel via Nanoparticles with Non-Mucoadhesive Surfaces Suppresses Cervical Tumor Growth (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014)
    Ming Yang
    Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA
    Adv Healthc Mater 3:1120. 2014
    ..The MPP platform may hold similar promise for local chemotherapy against tumors at other mucosal surfaces. ..
  10. pmc PEGylation of nanoparticles improves their cytoplasmic transport
    Junghae Suh
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Int J Nanomedicine 2:735-41. 2007
    ..2% (unmodified) to 48.8% (PEGylated). This result adds to an impressive list of positive benefits associated with PEGylation of drug and gene delivery vectors...
  11. pmc A poly(ethylene glycol)-based surfactant for formulation of drug-loaded mucus penetrating particles
    Olcay Mert
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    J Control Release 157:455-60. 2012
    ..Our results offer a promising new method for engineering biodegradable, drug-loaded MPP for sustained and targeted delivery of therapeutics at mucosal surfaces...
  12. doi request reprint Intraperitoneal delivery of paclitaxel by poly(ether-anhydride) microspheres effectively suppresses tumor growth in a murine metastatic ovarian cancer model
    Ming Yang
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA
    Drug Deliv Transl Res 4:203-9. 2014
    ..Our findings support PTX/PEG-PSA microspheres as a promising drug delivery platform for IP therapy of ovarian cancer, and potentially other metastatic peritoneal cancers. ..
  13. pmc Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering JH Primary Appointment, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:158-71. 2009
    ..It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues...
  14. pmc Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is trapped by acidic but not by neutralized human cervicovaginal mucus
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    J Virol 83:11196-200. 2009
    ..Our results reveal that CVM likely plays an important but currently unappreciated role in decreasing the rate of HIV sexual transmission...
  15. doi request reprint Real-time multiple particle tracking of gene nanocarriers in complex biological environments
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 434:81-97. 2008
    ..We have applied MPT to enhance understanding of critical extracellular and intracellular bottlenecks to gene transfer...
  16. pmc Altering mucus rheology to "solidify" human mucus at the nanoscale
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e4294. 2009
    ..These findings provide important insight into the nanoscale structural and barrier properties of mucus, and how the penetration of foreign particles across mucus might be inhibited...
  17. ncbi request reprint Privileged delivery of polymer nanoparticles to the perinuclear region of live cells via a non-clathrin, non-degradative pathway
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Biomaterials 28:2876-84. 2007
    ....
  18. pmc Pretreatment of human cervicovaginal mucus with pluronic F127 enhances nanoparticle penetration without compromising mucus barrier properties to herpes simplex virus
    Laura M Ensign
    Center for Nanomedicine, Department of Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Departments of Neurosurgery and Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    Biomacromolecules 15:4403-9. 2014
    ..Pluronic F127 pretreatment holds potential as a method to safely improve the distribution, retention, and efficacy of nanoparticle formulations without compromising CVM barrier properties to pathogens...
  19. pmc Rapid transport of large polymeric nanoparticles in fresh undiluted human mucus
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:1482-7. 2007
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes in human mucus
    Ashish Jachak
    Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA
    Nanotoxicology 6:614-22. 2012
    ....
  21. pmc The penetration of fresh undiluted sputum expectorated by cystic fibrosis patients by non-adhesive polymer nanoparticles
    Jung Soo Suk
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biomaterials 30:2591-7. 2009
    ..The results also offer hope that desperately needed sputum-penetrating drug- and gene-carrier nanoparticles can be developed for CF...
  22. pmc Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth
    Ming Yang
    Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA
    Adv Healthc Mater 3:1044-52. 2014
    ..These results demonstrate the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. ..
  23. ncbi request reprint Quantifying the intracellular transport of viral and nonviral gene vectors in primary neurons
    Jung Soo Suk
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 232:461-9. 2007
    ..This result suggests that the sequestration of nonviral gene vectors within acidic vesicles may be a critical barrier to gene delivery to primary neurons in the central nervous system (CNS)...
  24. pmc Micro- and macrorheology of mucus
    Samuel K Lai
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering JH Primary Appointment, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Adv Drug Deliv Rev 61:86-100. 2009
    ....
  25. pmc Nanoparticle penetration of human cervicovaginal mucus: the effect of polyvinyl alcohol
    Ming Yang
    Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 N Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    J Control Release 192:202-8. 2014
    ..Thus, alternative methods for particle formulation, based on novel surfactants or changes in the formulation process, should be identified and developed in order to produce mucus-penetrating particles for mucosal applications. ..
  26. ncbi request reprint Gene delivery to differentiated neurotypic cells with RGD and HIV Tat peptide functionalized polymeric nanoparticles
    Jung Soo Suk
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    Biomaterials 27:5143-50. 2006
    ..RGD functionalization resulted in a statistically significant increase in vector escape from endosomes, suggesting it may improve gene delivery by more than one mechanism...