Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex-typical play: masculinization/defeminization in girls with an autism spectrum condition
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research Center, University of Cambridge, Douglas House, Cambridge, UK
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1028-35. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Fetal testosterone and sex differences in typical social development and in autism
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Child Neurol 21:825-45. 2006
  3. doi request reprint Turner syndrome: advances in understanding altered cognition, brain structure and function
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7160, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 25:144-9. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Fetal testosterone and sex differences
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, CB 7160, 7023 Neurosciences Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Early Hum Dev 82:755-60. 2006
  5. pmc Maturational trajectories of cortical brain development through the pubertal transition: unique species and sex differences in the monkey revealed through structural magnetic resonance imaging
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cereb Cortex 20:1053-63. 2010
  6. pmc Twin-singleton differences in neonatal brain structure
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America
    Twin Res Hum Genet 14:268-76. 2011
  7. pmc 2D:4D ratios in the first 2 years of life: Stability and relation to testosterone exposure and sensitivity
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, CB 7160, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Horm Behav 60:256-63. 2011
  8. pmc Turner syndrome and sexual differentiation of the brain: implications for understanding male-biased neurodevelopmental disorders
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry CB 7160, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 343 Medical Wings C, Campus Box 7160, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599 7160, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 3:293-306. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Gender-typed play and amniotic testosterone
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Dev Psychol 41:517-28. 2005

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex-typical play: masculinization/defeminization in girls with an autism spectrum condition
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research Center, University of Cambridge, Douglas House, Cambridge, UK
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1028-35. 2008
    ..We conclude that play preference studies in ASC provide partial support for the fetal androgen theory...
  2. ncbi request reprint Fetal testosterone and sex differences in typical social development and in autism
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Child Neurol 21:825-45. 2006
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Turner syndrome: advances in understanding altered cognition, brain structure and function
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7160, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 25:144-9. 2012
    ..This review highlights recent progress in understanding brain structure and function in Turner syndrome and identifies several critical research needs...
  4. ncbi request reprint Fetal testosterone and sex differences
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, CB 7160, 7023 Neurosciences Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Early Hum Dev 82:755-60. 2006
    ..In this article, we argue that prenatal and neonatal testosterone exposure are strong candidates for having a causal role in sexual dimorphism in human behaviour, including social development...
  5. pmc Maturational trajectories of cortical brain development through the pubertal transition: unique species and sex differences in the monkey revealed through structural magnetic resonance imaging
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cereb Cortex 20:1053-63. 2010
    ..The authors discuss the possible implications of these findings for research using the rhesus macaque as a model for neurodevelopmental disorders...
  6. pmc Twin-singleton differences in neonatal brain structure
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America
    Twin Res Hum Genet 14:268-76. 2011
    ..These differences should be taken into account when interpreting and designing studies in the early postnatal period...
  7. pmc 2D:4D ratios in the first 2 years of life: Stability and relation to testosterone exposure and sensitivity
    Rebecca C Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, CB 7160, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Horm Behav 60:256-63. 2011
    ..Results have important implications for the design and interpretation of studies which use 2D:4D as a proxy measure of prenatal testosterone exposure...
  8. pmc Turner syndrome and sexual differentiation of the brain: implications for understanding male-biased neurodevelopmental disorders
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Department of Psychiatry CB 7160, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 343 Medical Wings C, Campus Box 7160, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599 7160, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 3:293-306. 2011
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Gender-typed play and amniotic testosterone
    Rebecca Christine Knickmeyer
    Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Dev Psychol 41:517-28. 2005
    ..A critique of explanations for this finding is presented...