Ophir D Klein

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc FGF signaling regulates the number of posterior taste papillae by controlling progenitor field size
    Camille I Petersen
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    PLoS Genet 7:e1002098. 2011
  2. pmc Expression of microRNAs in the stem cell niche of the adult mouse incisor
    Andrew H Jheon
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e24536. 2011
  3. pmc BMI1 represses Ink4a/Arf and Hox genes to regulate stem cells in the rodent incisor
    Brian Biehs
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 15:846-52. 2013
  4. pmc Sprouty genes regulate proliferation and survival of human embryonic stem cells
    Hady Felfly
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology and Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Sci Rep 3:2277. 2013
  5. pmc Oral epithelial stem cells in tissue maintenance and disease: the first steps in a long journey
    KYLE B JONES
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, USA
    Int J Oral Sci 5:121-9. 2013
  6. pmc Acute fatal presentation of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in a previously healthy male
    Ophir D Klein
    Departments of Orofacial Sciences and Pediatrics, and Institute of Human Genetics, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, Box 0442, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Hepatol Int 2:390-4. 2008
  7. pmc An FGF signaling loop sustains the generation of differentiated progeny from stem cells in mouse incisors
    Ophir D Klein
    Department of Anatomy and Program in Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 2711, USA
    Development 135:377-85. 2008
  8. pmc Regulation of tooth number by fine-tuning levels of receptor-tyrosine kinase signaling
    Cyril Charles
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Development 138:4063-73. 2011
  9. pmc E-cadherin regulates the behavior and fate of epithelial stem cells and their progeny in the mouse incisor
    Chun Ying Li
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, UCSF, USA
    Dev Biol 366:357-66. 2012
  10. pmc Sprouty genes control diastema tooth development via bidirectional antagonism of epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling
    Ophir D Klein
    Department of Anatomy and Program in Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Dev Cell 11:181-90. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc FGF signaling regulates the number of posterior taste papillae by controlling progenitor field size
    Camille I Petersen
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    PLoS Genet 7:e1002098. 2011
    ....
  2. pmc Expression of microRNAs in the stem cell niche of the adult mouse incisor
    Andrew H Jheon
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e24536. 2011
    ..These studies point to miRNAs that likely play a role in the renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells during stem cell-fueled incisor growth...
  3. pmc BMI1 represses Ink4a/Arf and Hox genes to regulate stem cells in the rodent incisor
    Brian Biehs
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 15:846-52. 2013
    ....
  4. pmc Sprouty genes regulate proliferation and survival of human embryonic stem cells
    Hady Felfly
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology and Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Sci Rep 3:2277. 2013
    ..SPRY2 KD cells displayed impaired mitochondrial fusion and cell membrane damage, explaining in part the increased cell death. These data indicate that Sprouty genes regulate pathways involved in proliferation and cell death in hESCs. ..
  5. pmc Oral epithelial stem cells in tissue maintenance and disease: the first steps in a long journey
    KYLE B JONES
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, USA
    Int J Oral Sci 5:121-9. 2013
    ....
  6. pmc Acute fatal presentation of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in a previously healthy male
    Ophir D Klein
    Departments of Orofacial Sciences and Pediatrics, and Institute of Human Genetics, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, Box 0442, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Hepatol Int 2:390-4. 2008
    ....
  7. pmc An FGF signaling loop sustains the generation of differentiated progeny from stem cells in mouse incisors
    Ophir D Klein
    Department of Anatomy and Program in Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 2711, USA
    Development 135:377-85. 2008
    ..These data reveal that the generation of differentiated progeny from a particular stem cell population can be differently regulated in the embryo and adult...
  8. pmc Regulation of tooth number by fine-tuning levels of receptor-tyrosine kinase signaling
    Cyril Charles
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Development 138:4063-73. 2011
    ....
  9. pmc E-cadherin regulates the behavior and fate of epithelial stem cells and their progeny in the mouse incisor
    Chun Ying Li
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, UCSF, USA
    Dev Biol 366:357-66. 2012
    ..Together, our data indicate that E-cadherin is an important regulator of stem cells and their progeny during growth of the mouse incisor...
  10. pmc Sprouty genes control diastema tooth development via bidirectional antagonism of epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling
    Ophir D Klein
    Department of Anatomy and Program in Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Dev Cell 11:181-90. 2006
    ....
  11. pmc PERP regulates enamel formation via effects on cell-cell adhesion and gene expression
    Andrew H Jheon
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    J Cell Sci 124:745-54. 2011
    ..Together, our data show that PERP is necessary for the integrity of the ameloblast-SI interface and that a lack of Perp causes downregulation of genes that are required for proper enamel formation...
  12. pmc Characterization of dental epithelial stem cells from the mouse incisor with two-dimensional and three-dimensional platforms
    Miquella G Chavez
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology and Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    Tissue Eng Part C Methods 19:15-24. 2013
    ..Insights into the mechanisms of stem cell maintenance in vitro will help lay the groundwork for the successful generation of bioengineered teeth from adult DESCs...
  13. pmc From molecules to mastication: the development and evolution of teeth
    Andrew H Jheon
    Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol 2:165-82. 2013
    ..Here, we review the major research areas and studies in the development and evolution of teeth, including morphogenesis, genetics and signaling, evolution of tooth development, and dental stem cells...
  14. pmc Coordinated activity of Spry1 and Spry2 is required for normal development of the external genitalia
    Saunders T Ching
    Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, United States Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, United States
    Dev Biol 386:1-11. 2014
    ....
  15. ncbi Characterization of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XL-HED) hair and sweat gland phenotypes using phototrichogram analysis and live confocal imaging
    KYLE B JONES
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Am J Med Genet A 161:1585-93. 2013
    ..The precise characterization of XL-HED phenotypes using sensitive and non-invasive techniques presented in our study will improve upon larger genotype-phenotype studies and the assessment of future therapies in XL-HED...
  16. pmc Hedgehog signaling regulates the generation of ameloblast progenitors in the continuously growing mouse incisor
    Kerstin Seidel
    Department of Orofacial Sciences, Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, UCSF, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 0442, USA
    Development 137:3753-61. 2010
    ..These results therefore reveal the existence of a positive-feedback loop in which differentiating progeny produce the signal that in turn allows them to be generated from stem cells...
  17. pmc Craniofacial and dental development in Costello syndrome
    Alice F Goodwin
    Program in Craniofacial and Mesenchymal Biology, and Division of Craniofacial Anomalies, Department of Orofacial Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
    Am J Med Genet A 164:1425-30. 2014
    ..Comparison of the craniofacial and dental phenotype in CS with other RASopathies, such as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), provides insight into the complexities of Ras/MAPK signaling in human craniofacial and dental development...
  18. pmc The branching programme of mouse lung development
    Ross J Metzger
    Department of Biochemistry and HHMI, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5307, USA
    Nature 453:745-50. 2008
    ..We show that this hierarchical and modular programme is genetically tractable, and it is ideally suited to encoding and evolving the complex networks of the lung and other branched organs...
  19. pmc Stem cell and biomaterials research in dental tissue engineering and regeneration
    Orapin V Horst
    Division of Endodontics, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 0758, USA
    Dent Clin North Am 56:495-520. 2012
    ..Advances in biomaterial sciences including microfabrication, self-assembled biomimetic peptides, and 3-dimensional printing hold great promise for whole-organ or partial tissue regeneration to replace teeth and periodontium...
  20. pmc Lgr5-expressing cells are sufficient and necessary for postnatal mammary gland organogenesis
    Vicki Plaks
    Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 0452, USA
    Cell Rep 3:70-8. 2013
    ..Loss-of-function and depletion experiments of Lgr5(+) cells from transplanted MECs or from pubertal MGs revealed that these cells are not only sufficient but also necessary for postnatal mammary organogenesis...
  21. doi Clefting in trisomy 9p patients: genotype-phenotype correlation using microarray comparative genomic hybridization
    Angie Jelin
    Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Craniofac Surg 21:1376-9. 2010
    ..2. Our case supports the utility of array comparative genomic hybridization for the precise characterization of chromosomal anomalies and for the ascertainment of genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with partial trisomy 9p...