Temitope O Keku

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is not an independent biomarker of colorectal adenoma risk
    Kathryn E Hamilton
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7545, USA
    BMC Res Notes 3:144. 2010
  2. pmc Fusobacterium is associated with colorectal adenomas
    Amber N McCoy
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e53653. 2013
  3. pmc Antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients and risk of distal colorectal cancer
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, McGavran Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 21:1171-81. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599 7032, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 23:1127-38. 2012
  5. pmc Dietary patterns, food groups, and rectal cancer risk in Whites and African-Americans
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18:1552-61. 2009
  6. pmc Association of plasma endotoxin, inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Melissa Kang
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina, 103 Mason Farm Road, 7340 Medical Biomolecular Research Building, CB 7032, 27599 7032, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    BMC Cancer 13:91. 2013
  7. pmc Associations of red meat, fat, and protein intake with distal colorectal cancer risk
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Nutr Cancer 62:701-9. 2010
  8. pmc Apoptosis in normal rectal mucosa, baseline adenoma characteristics, and risk of future adenomas
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17:306-10. 2008
  9. pmc Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Sangmi Kim
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Res 68:323-8. 2008
  10. pmc Local IGFBP-3 mRNA expression, apoptosis and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    BMC Cancer 8:143. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. pmc Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is not an independent biomarker of colorectal adenoma risk
    Kathryn E Hamilton
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7545, USA
    BMC Res Notes 3:144. 2010
    ..As SOCS3 has been shown to inhibit the actions of IL-6 and TNFalpha in the intestine, we hypothesized that decreased SOCS3 expression in normal mucosa may predispose to adenomas and thus increase risk for CRC...
  2. pmc Fusobacterium is associated with colorectal adenomas
    Amber N McCoy
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e53653. 2013
    ..33, p = 0.06 while it was 0.44, p = 0.01 for Fusobacterium and IL-10. These results support a link between the abundance of Fusobacterium in colonic mucosa and adenomas and suggest a possible role for mucosal inflammation in this process...
  3. pmc Antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients and risk of distal colorectal cancer
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, McGavran Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 21:1171-81. 2010
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599 7032, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 23:1127-38. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Dietary patterns, food groups, and rectal cancer risk in Whites and African-Americans
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18:1552-61. 2009
    ..We examined the relationship between food groups and dietary patterns and risk for rectal cancer in non-Hispanic Whites and African-Americans...
  6. pmc Association of plasma endotoxin, inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Melissa Kang
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina, 103 Mason Farm Road, 7340 Medical Biomolecular Research Building, CB 7032, 27599 7032, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    BMC Cancer 13:91. 2013
    ..Given the evidence linking inflammation and colorectal cancer, we sought to determine if plasma endotoxin concentrations are associated with indicators of systemic or local inflammation and colorectal adenomas...
  7. pmc Associations of red meat, fat, and protein intake with distal colorectal cancer risk
    Christina Dawn Williams
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Nutr Cancer 62:701-9. 2010
    ..77). Red meat consumption in Whites was associated with a marginally significant risk reduction (Q4 OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43-1.00). Our results do not support the hypotheses that fat, protein, and red meat increase the risk of distal CRC...
  8. pmc Apoptosis in normal rectal mucosa, baseline adenoma characteristics, and risk of future adenomas
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17:306-10. 2008
    ..If confirmed in larger studies, apoptosis could potentially be used to identify patients at highest risk for developing new adenomas...
  9. pmc Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Sangmi Kim
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Res 68:323-8. 2008
    ..56 (95% CI, 1.03-2.36) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.10-2.52), respectively. Our findings indicate that systemic inflammation might be involved in the early development of colorectal neoplasia...
  10. pmc Local IGFBP-3 mRNA expression, apoptosis and risk of colorectal adenomas
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    BMC Cancer 8:143. 2008
    ..We evaluated the association between tissue or plasma IGFBP-3 and risk of colorectal adenomas or low apoptosis...
  11. ncbi request reprint Vitamin C intake and apoptosis in normal rectal epithelium
    Alexandra E Connelly
    Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 12:559-65. 2003
    ..Given that high apoptosis may lower colorectal cancer risk, vitamin C supplements may be contraindicated for patients with a history of adenomas...
  12. ncbi request reprint Gastric cancer and the high combination prevalence of host cytokine genotypes and Helicobacter pylori in Honduras
    Douglas R Morgan
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 4:1103-11. 2006
    ..We investigated the cytokine profile in the Latino population, specifically Honduras, a high-incidence region, and the use of the combination prevalence of H pylori and genotypes in identifying high-risk populations...
  13. pmc The association between diabetes, insulin use, and colorectal cancer among Whites and African Americans
    Lisa C Vinikoor
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18:1239-42. 2009
    ..No association was present among African Americans. Insulin use was also positively associated with rectal cancer among Whites...
  14. ncbi request reprint 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677 and 1298 polymorphisms, folate intake, and microsatellite instability in colon cancer
    Allison M Eaton
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:2023-9. 2005
    ..These results indicate that the relationship between MTHFR genotypes and MSI is influenced by folate status...
  15. ncbi request reprint Calcium, vitamin D, and apoptosis in the rectal epithelium
    Eric A Miller
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:525-8. 2005
    ..This report describes the associations of calcium intake and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels with apoptosis in colorectal epithelium...
  16. pmc Assessment of serum proteomics to detect large colon adenomas
    David F Ransohoff
    Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7080, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17:2188-93. 2008
    ..They also highlight the importance of understanding sources of "noise" and "bias" in studies of proteomics assays...
  17. ncbi request reprint Insulin resistance, apoptosis, and colorectal adenoma risk
    Temitope O Keku
    Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599 7555, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:2076-81. 2005
    ..These findings suggest that insulin may act early in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence to promote the development of colorectal adenoma by decreasing apoptosis in the normal mucosa...
  18. doi request reprint Somatic gene mutations in African Americans may predict worse outcomes in colorectal cancer
    Melissa Kang
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Cancer Biomark 13:359-66. 2013
    ..African Americans have worse outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC) than Caucasians. We sought to determine if KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations might contribute to the racial differences in CRC outcome...
  19. ncbi request reprint Gene testing: what the health professional needs to know
    Temitope O Keku
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Nutr 133:3754S-3757S. 2003
    ..To meet these demands, physicians and other health professionals should use available educational genetic resources to provide adequate patient care...
  20. ncbi request reprint IGF-I and TGF-beta1 have distinct effects on phenotype and proliferation of intestinal fibroblasts
    James G Simmons
    Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7545, USA
    Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 283:G809-18. 2002
    ..We propose that during intestinal inflammation, regulation of activated phenotype and proliferation may require sequential actions of TGF-beta1 and IGF-I, but they may act in concert to increase collagen deposition...
  21. pmc Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs
    Felix Araujo-Perez
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Gut Microbes 3:530-5. 2012
    ..0001) and Eubacteria (p = 0.0003) in swab samples compared with biopsies. Our findings suggest that rectal swabs and rectal mucosal samples provide different views of the microbiota in the large intestine...
  22. ncbi request reprint RNA expression analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors
    Shannon K Penland
    Department of Medicine, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7295, USA
    Lab Invest 87:383-91. 2007
    ..Although only a minority of FFPE blocks could be analyzed, we show that informative RNA expression analysis can be derived from selected FFPE samples...
  23. pmc KRAS/BRAF mutation status and ERK1/2 activation as biomarkers for MEK1/2 inhibitor therapy in colorectal cancer
    Jen Jen Yeh
    Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 450 West Drive, CB 7295, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7295, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 8:834-43. 2009
    ..Our results suggest that although MEK inhibitors show promise in colorectal cancer, KRAS/BRAF mutation status, but not ERK activation as previously thought, may be useful biomarkers for MEK inhibitor sensitivity...
  24. ncbi request reprint Family history of colon cancer: what does it mean and how is it useful?
    Temitope O Keku
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, CB 7555, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7555, USA
    Am J Prev Med 24:170-6. 2003
    ..Family history of colon cancer can be deconstructed into causal and noncausal explanations, which include genetic factors, environmental factors, gene-environment interactions, misclassification, and differences in screening...
  25. pmc Fusobacterium spp. and colorectal cancer: cause or consequence?
    Temitope O Keku
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Electronic address
    Trends Microbiol 21:506-8. 2013
    ..Recent studies have implicated overabundance of Fusobacterium in association with colorectal adenomas and cancer. Two articles published in Cell Host & Microbe provide insights into the Fusobacterium-CRC relationship. ..
  26. ncbi request reprint Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas
    Christopher Martin
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599, USA
    Gastroenterology 123:1770-7. 2002
    ..We examined grossly normal rectal mucosa in patients with adenomas and adenoma-free controls to assess the associations between NSAID use, adenomatous polyps, and apoptosis...
  27. ncbi request reprint Reduction of spontaneous and irradiation-induced apoptosis in small intestine of IGF-I transgenic mice
    Heather R Wilkins
    Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599, USA
    Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 283:G457-64. 2002
    ..IGF-I regulates cell number by stimulating crypt cell proliferation and decreasing apoptosis preferentially within the stem cell compartment...