William H Karasov

Summary

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Field exposure of frog embryos and tadpoles along a pollution gradient in the Fox River and Green Bay ecosystem in Wisconsin, Usa
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:942-53. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Comparative digestive physiology
    William H Karasov
    Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Compr Physiol 3:741-83. 2013
  3. pmc Capacity for absorption of water-soluble secondary metabolites greater in birds than in rodents
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Russell Laboratories, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e32417. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, 226 Russell Labs, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:677-85. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Anatomical and histological changes in the alimentary tract of migrating blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla): a comparison among fed, fasted, food-restricted, and refed birds
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:149-60. 2004
  6. doi request reprint Ecological physiology of diet and digestive systems
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 53706, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 73:69-93. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Digestive physiology: a view from molecules to ecosystem
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301:R276-84. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Intestinal perfusion indicates high reliance on paracellular nutrient absorption in an insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis
    Edwin R Price
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 164:351-5. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Effect of age and diet on total and paracellular glucose absorption in nestling house sparrows
    Paweł Brzęk
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:501-11. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Digestive response to restricted feeding in migratory yellow-rumped warblers
    Kelly A Lee
    Zoology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 75:314-23. 2002

Detail Information

Publications49

  1. ncbi request reprint Field exposure of frog embryos and tadpoles along a pollution gradient in the Fox River and Green Bay ecosystem in Wisconsin, Usa
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 24:942-53. 2005
    ..Other environmental factors that were present but unmeasured in the field, such as ultraviolet-B radiation as well as water flow and level fluctuations, might have caused differences in hatching success at the field sites...
  2. doi request reprint Comparative digestive physiology
    William H Karasov
    Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Compr Physiol 3:741-83. 2013
    ..Paracellular absorption is important in many birds. Natural toxins are ubiquitous in foods and may influence key features such as digesta transit, enzymatic breakdown, microbial fermentation, and absorption...
  3. pmc Capacity for absorption of water-soluble secondary metabolites greater in birds than in rodents
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Russell Laboratories, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e32417. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, 226 Russell Labs, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:677-85. 2007
    ..The model also may be useful for predicting Hg levels in adults and in the eggs that they lay, but its accuracy in both chicks and adults needs to be tested in free-living birds...
  5. ncbi request reprint Anatomical and histological changes in the alimentary tract of migrating blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla): a comparison among fed, fasted, food-restricted, and refed birds
    William H Karasov
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:149-60. 2004
    ..have excess digestive capacity, it may also be that the physiological process or processes limiting very high feeding rate lie elsewhere than in the digestive system...
  6. doi request reprint Ecological physiology of diet and digestive systems
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 53706, USA
    Annu Rev Physiol 73:69-93. 2011
    ..The microbiome seems to be characterized by large beta diversity among hosts and by a common core metagenome and seems to differ flexibly among animals with different diets...
  7. doi request reprint Digestive physiology: a view from molecules to ecosystem
    William H Karasov
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301:R276-84. 2011
    ..The quantitative details can be used to set regulatory levels for mercury that will protect wildlife...
  8. doi request reprint Intestinal perfusion indicates high reliance on paracellular nutrient absorption in an insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis
    Edwin R Price
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 164:351-5. 2013
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Effect of age and diet on total and paracellular glucose absorption in nestling house sparrows
    Paweł Brzęk
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:501-11. 2010
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Digestive response to restricted feeding in migratory yellow-rumped warblers
    Kelly A Lee
    Zoology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 75:314-23. 2002
    ..Digestive efficiency did not differ between groups. These results suggest that before migration yellow-rumped warblers have some spare digestive capacity to compensate for declines in their digestive organ masses during migration...
  11. doi request reprint Fully reversible phenotypic plasticity of digestive physiology in young house sparrows: lack of long-term effect of early diet composition
    Pawel Brzek
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Exp Biol 214:2755-60. 2011
    ..However, comparison with other species suggests that the magnitude of digestive flexibility in young passerines may be evolutionarily matched to species-specific variation in feeding conditions...
  12. ncbi request reprint The oral bioavailability and toxicokinetics of methylmercury in common loon (Gavia immer) chicks
    Francois Fournier
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, 226 Russell Labs, 1630 Linden Drive, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 133:703-14. 2002
    ..The results of this study highlight the importance of feather growth on the toxicokinetics of methylmercury...
  13. doi request reprint Growth and development of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in response to chronic food restriction throughout the nestling period
    Tess L Killpack
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:1806-15. 2012
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Developmental adjustments of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) nestlings to diet composition
    Paweł Brzęk
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:1284-93. 2009
    ..Future studies must test whether the diet-dependent increase in maltase activity during development is irreversible or reversible, reflecting, respectively, a developmental plasticity or a phenotypic flexibility...
  15. doi request reprint Low plasticity in digestive physiology constrains feeding ecology in diet specialist, zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)
    Paweł Brzęk
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:798-807. 2010
    ..We hypothesize that this difference might reflect the lack of a diet switch during ontogeny or result from high specialization to a narrow diet niche...
  16. doi request reprint Pancreatic and intestinal carbohydrases are matched to dietary starch level in wild passerine birds
    Kevin D Kohl
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 84:195-203. 2011
    ..We hypothesize that the need for nitrogen and essential amino acids can prevent the evolution of a low activity of proteases, even in species feeding on a low-protein diet...
  17. doi request reprint The integration of digestion and osmoregulation in the avian gut
    Todd J McWhorter
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 84:533-65. 2009
    ..The coincident impacts of these changes on osmoregulatory or immune function of the gut are poorly understood...
  18. doi request reprint Assessment of radiolabeled D-glucose and the nonmetabolizable analog 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as tools for in vivo absorption studies
    Todd J McWhorter
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53717, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:376-84. 2010
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Morphometrics of the avian small intestine compared with that of nonflying mammals: a phylogenetic approach
    Shana R Lavin
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 81:526-50. 2008
    ..e., a reduced spare capacity)...
  20. pmc Hummingbirds rely on both paracellular and carrier-mediated intestinal glucose absorption to fuel high metabolism
    Todd J McWhorter
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Biol Lett 2:131-4. 2006
    ..Even while possessing the highest active glucose transport rates measured in vertebrates, hummingbirds must rely partially on passive non-mediated intestinal nutrient absorption to meet their high mass-specific metabolic demands...
  21. ncbi request reprint Mechanistic bases for differences in passive absorption
    Shana R Lavin
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:2754-64. 2007
    ..8 A (M(r) ca. 350), and permeability to smaller molecules at the tissue level is higher in pigeons than in rats...
  22. doi request reprint Allometry of paracellular absorption in birds
    Shana R Lavin
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 81:551-60. 2008
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Lethal and sublethal effects of chronic cadmium exposure on northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) tadpoles
    Jackson A Gross
    Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1192-7. 2007
    ..However, additional studies with other chemicals are needed to further explore the potential for adverse effects of contaminants on the complex life cycle of amphibians...
  24. ncbi request reprint Sublethal effects of lead on northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) tadpoles
    Te Hao Chen
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:1383-9. 2006
    ..According to our results, the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater-quality chronic criterion for lead (2.5 microg/L) is appropriate to protect northern leopard frog larvae...
  25. doi request reprint Toxicokinetics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers across life stages in the northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens)
    Tawnya L Cary
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 32:1631-40. 2013
    ..Because the kinetics of PBDEs in L. pipiens differed among life stages, developmental life stage-especially for species that undergo metamorphosis-should be considered when determining the toxicity of persistent organic pollutants...
  26. pmc Effect of age and diet composition on activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds
    Paweł Brzęk
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 183:685-97. 2013
    ..We conclude that activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds is under strong genetic control, which enables evolutionary adjustment to typical diet composition but is less adept for short term, diet-related flexibility. ..
  27. doi request reprint Effects of chronic polybrominated diphenyl ether exposure on gonadal development in the northern leopard frog, Rana pipiens
    Nathan D Van Schmidt
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 31:347-54. 2012
    ..No intersex or increased incidence of gonadal abnormality were detected. These findings indicate that PBDEs may disrupt sexual differentiation in frogs at low, environmentally relevant concentrations...
  28. doi request reprint Critical period of sensitivity for effects of cadmium on frog growth and development
    Jackson A Gross
    Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 28:1227-32. 2009
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Chronic, dietary polybrominated diphenyl ether exposure affects survival, growth, and development of Rana pipiens tadpoles
    Tawnya L Cary Coyle
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Russell Labs Rm 120, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 29:133-41. 2010
    ..At environmentally relevant levels, PBDEs induced mortality as well as sublethal effects on developing tadpoles through dietary exposure...
  30. pmc Ontogeny of adaptive antibody response to a model antigen in captive altricial zebra finches
    Tess L Killpack
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e47294. 2012
    ..Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny...
  31. pmc Paracellular Absorption Is Relatively Low in the Herbivorous Egyptian Spiny-Tailed Lizard, Uromastyx aegyptia
    Todd J McWhorter
    School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy Campus, Adelaide, SA, Australia Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e61869. 2013
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Do salivary proline-rich proteins counteract dietary hydrolyzable tannin in laboratory rats?
    Michele M Skopec
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    J Chem Ecol 30:1679-92. 2004
    ..001, respectively). Production of PRPs increased the amount of PGG excreted intact in the feces but at the cost of diminishing apparent dry matter and nitrogen digestibility...
  33. ncbi request reprint Paracellular nutrient absorption in a gum-feeding new world primate, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus
    Todd J McWhorter
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, 226 Russell Labs, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI, USA
    Am J Primatol 69:1399-411. 2007
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint A new method to measure intestinal activity of P-glycoprotein in avian and mammalian species
    Adam K Green
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1630 Linden Dr, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 175:57-66. 2005
    ..Among fungal metabolites, sterigmatocystin (5 microM), but not aflatoxin B1 (5 microM), significantly increased digoxin accumulation...
  35. ncbi request reprint Adverse effects of chronic copper exposure in larval northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens)
    Te Hao Chen
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1470-5. 2007
    ..The existing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater-quality chronic criterion for copper appears to be protective for larval Rana pipiens...
  36. doi request reprint Hibernation in warm hibernacula by free-ranging Formosan leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros terasensis, in subtropical Taiwan
    Jian Nan Liu
    Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Comp Physiol B 181:125-35. 2011
    ..Adult bats lost an average of 13-14% of body mass during an approximately 70-day hibernation period. We suggest that H. terasensis might have remarkably low torpid metabolic rates during hibernation...
  37. ncbi request reprint Intestinal capacity of P-glycoprotein is higher in the juniper specialist, Neotoma stephensi, than the sympatric generalist, Neotoma albigula
    Adam K Green
    Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, 1630 Linden Dr, WI 53706, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 139:325-33. 2004
    ..stephensi, exhibiting a 2.4 fold higher capacity than the generalist, N. albigula. This result suggests that Pgp may play a role in the ability of N. stephensi to tolerate juniper...
  38. ncbi request reprint Effect of mono-ortho and di-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners on leopard frog survival and sexual development
    Mariana Beatriz Jofré
    Area de Biología, Departamento de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis, Argentina
    Chemosphere 70:1609-19. 2008
    ..The effects of PCB congeners on sexual differentiation occur at concentrations higher than observed in frogs in the Fox River/Green Bay ecosystem...
  39. pmc The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: high intestinal paracellular absorption compensates for smaller guts
    Enrique Caviedes-Vidal
    Laboratorio de Biología Prof E Caviedes Codelia, Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, and Departamento de Bioquímica y Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional de San Luís Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, 5700 San Luis, Argentina
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:19132-7. 2007
    ..It appears that reduced intestinal size and relatively enhanced intestinal paracellular absorption can be added to the suite of adaptations that have evolved in actively flying vertebrates...
  40. ncbi request reprint How the house sparrow Passer domesticus absorbs glucose
    Min Hwang Chang
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin Madison, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:3109-21. 2004
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint Distribution and accumulation of mercury in tissues of captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks
    Kevin P Kenow
    U S Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, 2630 Fanta Reed Road, La Crosse, Wisconsin 54603, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1047-55. 2007
    ..82-0.93) with internal tissues. We supply regression models that may be used to provide perspective and a useful means of interpreting the variety of measures of Hg exposure reported in the literature...
  42. doi request reprint Drinking water boosts food intake rate, body mass increase and fat accumulation in migratory blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla)
    Ido Tsurim
    Department of Life Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P O Box 653, 84105 Beersheba, Israel
    Oecologia 156:21-30. 2008
    ..Restricted water availability may also impede the blackcap's dietary shift from insectivory to frugivory, a shift probably necessary for successful pre-migratory fattening...
  43. ncbi request reprint Effects of methyl mercury exposure on the growth of juvenile common loons
    Kevin P Kenow
    US Geological Survey, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, 2630 Fanta Reed Road, La Crosse, WI 54603, USA
    Ecotoxicology 12:171-82. 2003
    ..Lake-source effects suggest that in ovo exposure to methyl mercury or other factors related to lake pH have consequences on chick development...
  44. ncbi request reprint Creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) resin increases water demands and reduces energy availability in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida)
    Antonio M Mangione
    Departamento de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 5700 San Luis, Argentina
    J Chem Ecol 30:1409-29. 2004
    ..The increased water requirement and energy losses of woodrats consuming a diet with resin could have notable ecological consequences...
  45. ncbi request reprint Absorption of sugars in the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus): a paradox explained
    Christopher R Tracy
    Mitrani Department of Desert Ecology, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, 84990 Midreshet Ben Gurion, Israel
    J Exp Biol 210:1726-34. 2007
    ..We estimated that Egyptian fruit bats rely on passive, paracellular absorption for the majority of their glucose absorption (at least 55% of 3OMD-glucose absorption), much more than in non-flying mammals...
  46. doi request reprint Latitudinal trends in digestive flexibility: testing the climatic variability hypothesis with data on the intestinal length of rodents
    Daniel E Naya
    Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity and Departamento de Ecologia, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, CP 6513677, Chile
    Am Nat 172:E122-34. 2008
    ..When seen from the perspective of digestive physiology, our analysis is an important piece of evidence on the adaptive value of digestive flexibility in small mammals...
  47. pmc Paracellular absorption: a bat breaks the mammal paradigm
    Enrique Caviedes-Vidal
    Laboratorio de Biología Prof E Caviedes Codelia, Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas CONICET, San Luis, Argentina
    PLoS ONE 3:e1425. 2008
    ....
  48. ncbi request reprint Oxidative stress induced in PCB 126-exposed northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens
    Yue Wern Huang
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri Rolla, Rolla, Missouri 65409 1120, USA
    J Toxicol Environ Health A 70:676-81. 2007
    ..A similar delay in response was reported in fish and may relate to lower metabolic rate and physiological reactions in ectothermic vertebrates...
  49. ncbi request reprint Electroaffinity in paracellular absorption of hydrophilic D-dipeptides by sparrow intestine
    Juan G Chediack
    Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Laboratorio de Biología, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Casilla de Correos 226, 5700, San Luis, Argentina
    J Comp Physiol B 176:303-9. 2006
    ..30+/-0.05 vs. F=0.17+/-0.03). These findings give the first evidence of cation selectivity by the paracellular route in the absorption of hydrosoluble solutes in the small intestine in birds...