Ned Kalin

Summary

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Amygdalar and hippocampal substrates of anxious temperament differ in their heritability
    Jonathan A Oler
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    Nature 466:864-8. 2010
  2. pmc Trait-like brain activity during adolescence predicts anxious temperament in primates
    Andrew S Fox
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2570. 2008
  3. pmc Characterization of single-nucleotide variation in Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Gloria L Fawcett
    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    BMC Genomics 12:311. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint The role of the central nucleus of the amygdala in mediating fear and anxiety in the primate
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 24:5506-15. 2004
  5. pmc Brain regions associated with the expression and contextual regulation of anxiety in primates
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 1176, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 58:796-804. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Role of the primate orbitofrontal cortex in mediating anxious temperament
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 1176, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 62:1134-9. 2007
  7. pmc The serotonin transporter genotype is associated with intermediate brain phenotypes that depend on the context of eliciting stressor
    N H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA
    Mol Psychiatry 13:1021-7. 2008
  8. pmc Subgenual prefrontal cortex activity predicts individual differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity across different contexts
    Allison L Jahn
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 67:175-81. 2010
  9. pmc Orbitofrontal cortex lesions alter anxiety-related activity in the primate bed nucleus of stria terminalis
    Andrew S Fox
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 30:7023-7. 2010
  10. pmc Serotonin transporter availability in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis predicts anxious temperament and brain glucose metabolic activity
    Jonathan A Oler
    Departments of Psychiatry, HealthEmotions Research Institute, University of Wisconsin Madison, 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 29:9961-6. 2009

Detail Information

Publications54

  1. pmc Amygdalar and hippocampal substrates of anxious temperament differ in their heritability
    Jonathan A Oler
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    Nature 466:864-8. 2010
    ..Even though these structures are closely linked, the results suggest differential influences of genes and environment on how these brain regions mediate AT and the ongoing risk of developing anxiety and depression...
  2. pmc Trait-like brain activity during adolescence predicts anxious temperament in primates
    Andrew S Fox
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2570. 2008
    ..In addition, the findings provide an explanation for why individuals with anxious temperament have difficulty relaxing in environments that others perceive as non-stressful...
  3. pmc Characterization of single-nucleotide variation in Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
    Gloria L Fawcett
    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
    BMC Genomics 12:311. 2011
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint The role of the central nucleus of the amygdala in mediating fear and anxiety in the primate
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 24:5506-15. 2004
    ..These findings suggest that in primates, the CeA is involved in mediating fear- and anxiety-related behavioral and pituitary-adrenal responses as well as in modulating brain CRF activity...
  5. pmc Brain regions associated with the expression and contextual regulation of anxiety in primates
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 1176, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 58:796-804. 2005
    ..A key to successful adaptation is the ability to regulate emotional responses in relation to changing environmental demands or contexts...
  6. ncbi request reprint Role of the primate orbitofrontal cortex in mediating anxious temperament
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 1176, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 62:1134-9. 2007
    ..This study assessed the role of the primate OFC in mediating anxious temperament and its involvement in fear responses...
  7. pmc The serotonin transporter genotype is associated with intermediate brain phenotypes that depend on the context of eliciting stressor
    N H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA
    Mol Psychiatry 13:1021-7. 2008
    ..These findings demonstrate context-dependent intermediate phenotypes in s carriers that provide a framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying the vulnerabilities of s-allele carriers exposed to different types of stressors...
  8. pmc Subgenual prefrontal cortex activity predicts individual differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity across different contexts
    Allison L Jahn
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 67:175-81. 2010
    ....
  9. pmc Orbitofrontal cortex lesions alter anxiety-related activity in the primate bed nucleus of stria terminalis
    Andrew S Fox
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 30:7023-7. 2010
    ..Thus it appears that an important function of the OFC in response to threat is to modulate the BNST, which may more directly influence the expression of BI...
  10. pmc Serotonin transporter availability in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis predicts anxious temperament and brain glucose metabolic activity
    Jonathan A Oler
    Departments of Psychiatry, HealthEmotions Research Institute, University of Wisconsin Madison, 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 29:9961-6. 2009
    ..Collectively, these findings suggest that serotonergic modulation of neuronal excitability in the neural circuitry associated with anxiety mediates the developmental risk for affect-related psychopathology...
  11. ncbi request reprint Amygdalar interhemispheric functional connectivity differs between the non-depressed and depressed human brain
    William Irwin
    Department of Psychology, Laboratory for Affected Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Neuroimage 21:674-86. 2004
    ..We interpret and discuss the nature of this connectivity in the depressed brain in the context of dysfunctional frontocortical-amygdalar interactions which accompany clinical depression...
  12. ncbi request reprint Amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex are inversely coupled during regulation of negative affect and predict the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion among older adults
    Heather L Urry
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4415-25. 2006
    ..Individual differences yielded the predicted link between brain function while reducing negative affect in the laboratory and diurnal regulation of endocrine activity in the home environment...
  13. ncbi request reprint Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), but not corticosterone, increases basolateral amygdala CRF-binding protein
    Ryan J Herringa
    Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, 6001 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, WI 53719 1176, USA
    Brain Res 1083:21-8. 2006
    ..These results suggest that CRF, but not corticosterone, may be responsible for stress-induced increases in BLA CRF-BP gene expression. Furthermore, this effect appears to be mediated by mechanisms other than the identified CRF receptors...
  14. ncbi request reprint Corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptors in the basolateral amygdala mediate stress-induced anorexia
    Kimberly A Jochman
    Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Behav Neurosci 119:1448-58. 2005
    ..These data demonstrate that stimulation of intra-BLA CRF-sub-1 receptors is both necessary and sufficient for eliciting stress-induced anorexia and grooming...
  15. pmc Thalamic dysfunction in schizophrenia suggested by whole-night deficits in slow and fast spindles
    Fabio Ferrarelli
    School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 167:1339-48. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Stress decreases, while central nucleus amygdala lesions increase, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha gene expression during tissue healing in non-human primates
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 20:564-8. 2006
    ..Because of brain and behavioral similarities between rhesus monkeys and humans, these results are particularly relevant to understanding brain mechanisms that influence healing in humans...
  17. pmc Integrating VBM into the General Linear Model with voxelwise anatomical covariates
    Terrence R Oakes
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Rm T 133, Waisman Center, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705, USA
    Neuroimage 34:500-8. 2007
    ..In either case, ignoring the readily available structural information can lead to misinterpretation of functional results...
  18. ncbi request reprint Acute cortisol elevations cause heightened arousal ratings of objectively nonarousing stimuli
    Heather C Abercrombie
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Emotion 5:354-9. 2005
    ..However, cortisol was unrelated to self-reported affective state. Thus, findings indicate that acute cortisol elevations cause heightened arousal in response to objectively nonarousing stimuli, in the absence of effects on mood...
  19. pmc Reduced capacity to sustain positive emotion in major depression reflects diminished maintenance of fronto-striatal brain activation
    Aaron S Heller
    Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:22445-50. 2009
    ..These findings support the hypothesis that anhedonia in depressed patients reflects the inability to sustain engagement of structures involved in positive affect and reward...
  20. pmc Anticipatory activation in the amygdala and anterior cingulate in generalized anxiety disorder and prediction of treatment response
    Jack B Nitschke
    Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 53705 2280, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 166:302-10. 2009
    ..This study tested whether patients with generalized anxiety disorder have alterations in anticipatory amygdala function and whether anticipatory activity in the anterior cingulate cortex predicts treatment response...
  21. ncbi request reprint Failure to regulate: counterproductive recruitment of top-down prefrontal-subcortical circuitry in major depression
    Tom Johnstone
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705, USA
    J Neurosci 27:8877-84. 2007
    ....
  22. pmc The distribution of D2/D3 receptor binding in the adolescent rhesus monkey using small animal PET imaging
    Bradley T Christian
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, USA Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Madison, USA
    Neuroimage 44:1334-44. 2009
    ..To facilitate comparison within and between primate models, we report in vivo D2/D3 binding in a large cohort of adolescent rhesus monkeys...
  23. ncbi request reprint Stimulation of lateral septum CRF2 receptors promotes anorexia and stress-like behaviors: functional homology to CRF1 receptors in basolateral amygdala
    Vaishali P Bakshi
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 27:10568-77. 2007
    ..These results indicate that one of the modes through which the CRF system promotes anorexia is the recruitment of stress-like states after stimulation of CRF2 receptors within the LS...
  24. pmc Environmental influences on family similarity in afternoon cortisol levels: twin and parent-offspring designs
    Jane E Schreiber
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:1131-7. 2006
    ....
  25. pmc Automatic physiological waveform processing for FMRI noise correction and analysis
    Daniel J Kelley
    Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1751. 2008
    ..PhysioNoise consistently identifies physiological fluctuations for fMRI noise correction and also generates covariates for subsequent analyses of brain activation and connectivity...
  26. ncbi request reprint Neural-cardiac coupling in threat-evoked anxiety
    Kim M Dalton
    W M Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 53705, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 17:969-80. 2005
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint A pilot study of group exercise training (GET) for women with primary breast cancer: feasibility and health benefits
    Gregory G Kolden
    Health Emotions Research Institute, University of Wisconsin, Madison Medical School 53719 1179, USA
    Psychooncology 11:447-56. 2002
    ..Discussion highlights the need for inclusion of physical activity programs in comprehensive, complementary treatment regimes for breast cancer patients...
  28. ncbi request reprint The neural substrates of affective processing in depressed patients treated with venlafaxine
    Richard J Davidson
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1202 West Johnson St, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 160:64-75. 2003
    ..Relations between baseline neural activation and response to treatment were also evaluated...
  29. ncbi request reprint Nonhuman primate studies of fear, anxiety, and temperament and the role of benzodiazepine receptors and GABA systems
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53719, USA
    J Clin Psychiatry 64:41-4. 2003
    ..We believe that these studies will provide insights into the adaptive and maladaptive responses of humans as they relate to psychopathology as associated with anxiety...
  30. ncbi request reprint Cortisol variation in humans affects memory for emotionally laden and neutral information
    Heather C Abercrombie
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Behav Neurosci 117:505-16. 2003
    ..Results suggest that the effects of cortisol on memory do not differ substantially for emotional and neutral information. The study provides evidence of beneficial effects of acute cortisol elevations on explicit memory in humans...
  31. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in the responses of naïve rhesus monkeys to snakes
    Eric E Nelson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, 53719 1176, USA
    Emotion 3:3-11. 2003
    ..A neurobiological model is presented that addresses potential mechanisms underlying these individual differences, their relation to fear, and how they may predispose to phobia development...
  32. ncbi request reprint Nonhuman primate models to study anxiety, emotion regulation, and psychopathology
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison Medical School, 6001 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, WI 53711, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1008:189-200. 2003
    ..In preliminary FDG positron emission tomography (PET) studies, functional linkages were established between the amygdala and prefrontal cortical regions that are associated with the activation of anxiety...
  33. ncbi request reprint Studying non-human primates: a gateway to understanding anxiety disorders
    Ned H Kalin
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin, 53719, USA
    Psychopharmacol Bull 38:8-13. 2004
    ..Psychopharmacology Bulletin. 2004;38(Suppl 1):8-13...
  34. ncbi request reprint Stability of amygdala BOLD response to fearful faces over multiple scan sessions
    Tom Johnstone
    W M Keck Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin, WI 53705, USA
    Neuroimage 25:1112-23. 2005
    ..Future studies might manipulate the experimental design to either amplify or attenuate this variability, according to the goals of the research...
  35. ncbi request reprint Reduction of stress-induced behavior by antagonism of corticotropin-releasing hormone 2 (CRH2) receptors in lateral septum or CRH1 receptors in amygdala
    Vaishali P Bakshi
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53719, USA
    J Neurosci 22:2926-35. 2002
    ..CRH2 receptors may thus represent a potential target for the development of novel CRH system anxiolytics...
  36. pmc Predator threat induces behavioral inhibition, pituitary-adrenal activation and changes in amygdala CRF-binding protein gene expression
    Patrick H Roseboom
    Neuroscience Training Program, University of Wisconsin Madison, 6001 Research Park Blvd, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 32:44-55. 2007
    ....
  37. pmc Early risk factors and developmental pathways to chronic high inhibition and social anxiety disorder in adolescence
    Marilyn J Essex
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 6001 Research Park Blvd, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 167:40-6. 2010
    ..The authors sought to identify early risk factors for, and developmental pathways to, chronic high inhibition among school-age children and the association of chronic high inhibition with social anxiety disorder by adolescence...
  38. ncbi request reprint The effects of acute stress on the regulation of central and basolateral amygdala CRF-binding protein gene expression
    Ryan J Herringa
    Neuroscience Training Program, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA
    Brain Res Mol Brain Res 131:17-25. 2004
    ..Because CRF-BP can modulate CRF action, changes in amygdala CRF-BP levels after stress exposure may affect the ability of an organism to adapt to future stressors...
  39. ncbi request reprint A [17F]-fluoromethane PET/TMS study of effective connectivity
    Fabio Ferrarelli
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 6001 Research Park Blvd, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Brain Res Bull 64:103-13. 2004
    ..Moreover, we found that TMS of prefrontal and motor cortical areas gave rise to trans-synaptic activation of subcortical circuits...
  40. ncbi request reprint Maternal stress beginning in infancy may sensitize children to later stress exposure: effects on cortisol and behavior
    Marilyn J Essex
    Department of Psychiatry, Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, University of Wisconsin, 6001 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 52:776-84. 2002
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint Fear, anxiety, and the neuroimaging of PTSD
    Eileen P Ahearn
    Willam S Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA
    Psychopharmacol Bull 40:88-103. 2007
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Reduced evoked gamma oscillations in the frontal cortex in schizophrenia patients: a TMS/EEG study
    Fabio Ferrarelli
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 165:996-1005. 2008
    ..The authors investigated EEG responses in schizophrenia patients and healthy comparison subjects following the application of TMS to the premotor cortex...
  43. pmc Affective style and in vivo immune response: neurobehavioral mechanisms
    Melissa A Rosenkranz
    Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1202 W Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:11148-52. 2003
    ..These data support the hypothesis that individuals characterized by a more negative affective style mount a weaker immune response and therefore may be at greater risk for illness than those with a more positive affective style...
  44. pmc Calling for help is independently modulated by brain systems underlying goal-directed behavior and threat perception
    Andrew S Fox
    Waisman Laboratory for Functional Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4176-9. 2005
    ..These findings in monkeys are relevant to humans and provide a conceptual neural framework to understand individual differences in how primates behave when in need of social support...
  45. ncbi request reprint Diurnal changes in corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA in the rat thalamus
    David T Hsu
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Neurosci Lett 338:33-6. 2003
    ..Dramatic changes in thalamic CRH mRNA levels may have important implications for the possible role of thalamic CRH systems in waking, arousal, and the stress response...
  46. ncbi request reprint Characterization of the human corticotropin-releasing factor2(a) receptor promoter: regulation by glucocorticoids and the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate pathway
    Steven A Nanda
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 1176, USA
    Endocrinology 145:5605-15. 2004
    ..Examination of expression from the human CRF2(a) promoter will provide insight into these model systems and may translate more readily to the development of therapeutics to treat human psychiatric illness...
  47. ncbi request reprint Decreased amygdala CRF-binding protein mRNA in post-mortem tissue from male but not female bipolar and schizophrenic subjects
    Ryan J Herringa
    Neuroscience Training Program, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:1822-31. 2006
    ..These results raise the possibility that men with decreased amygdala CRF-BP may be more vulnerable to the effects of stress exposure on the etiology or maintenance of bipolar disorder or schizophrenia...
  48. ncbi request reprint Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the investigation and treatment of schizophrenia: a review
    H Magnus Haraldsson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, 6001 Research Park Blvd, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Schizophr Res 71:1-16. 2004
    ..Such studies may reveal impaired effective connectivity between specific brain areas, which could identify these regions as targets for selective stimulation with therapeutic doses of TMS...
  49. ncbi request reprint REM sleep deprivation induces changes in coping responses that are not reversed by amphetamine
    Dolores Martinez-Gonzalez
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Madison 53719, USA
    Sleep 27:609-17. 2004
    ....
  50. ncbi request reprint Right frontal brain activity, cortisol, and withdrawal behavior in 6-month-old infants
    Kristin A Buss
    Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri Columbia, 65211, USA
    Behav Neurosci 117:11-20. 2003
    ..EEG during the withdrawal-negative affect task was associated with fear and sadness behaviors. Results are interpreted in the context of the previous primate work, and some putative mechanisms are discussed...
  51. ncbi request reprint Context-specific freezing and associated physiological reactivity as a dysregulated fear response
    Kristin A Buss
    Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
    Dev Psychol 40:583-94. 2004
    ..Implications for the conceptualization of dysregulated fear behaviors in the classification of extremely fearful children are discussed...
  52. pmc Effects of interferon-alpha on rhesus monkeys: a nonhuman primate model of cytokine-induced depression
    Jennifer C Felger
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, 1365 C Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 62:1324-33. 2007
    ..To establish a nonhuman primate model of cytokine-induced depression, we examined the effects of IFN-alpha on rhesus monkeys...
  53. pmc A functional magnetic resonance imaging predictor of treatment response to venlafaxine in generalized anxiety disorder
    Paul J Whalen
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:858-63. 2008
    ..Here, we sought to determine whether pretreatment amygdala and rostral ACC (rACC) reactivity to facial expressions could predict treatment outcomes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)...
  54. ncbi request reprint National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association consensus statement on the use of placebo in clinical trials of mood disorders
    Dennis S Charney
    Division of Intramural Research Programs, National Institute of Mental Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 59:262-70. 2002
    ..Research is needed on the ethical conduct of studies to limit risks of medication-free intervals and facilitate poststudy treatment. Patients must fully understand the risks and lack of individualized treatment involved in research...

Research Grants38

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..The findings from these studies will be highly relevant to humans, addressing the role of amygdala orbitofrontal interactions in mediating normal emotion and psychopathology. ..
  2. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The findings from these studies will be highly relevant to humans, addressing the role of amygdala orbitofrontal interactions in mediating normal emotion and psychopathology. ..
  3. Role of Central CRH in Stress-Induced Behavior
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  4. MICROPET: HIGH RESOLUTION SMALL ANIMAL PET SCANNER
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..This scanner will also enhance research efforts in such wide-ranging areas as cardiology, oncology neurology, radiology and medical physics. ..
  5. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The findings from these studies will be highly relevant to humans, addressing the role of amygdala orbitofrontal interactions in mediating normal emotion and psychopathology. ..
  6. Brain Mechanisms Mediating Genetic Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depression
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  7. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The findings from these studies will be highly relevant to humans, addressing the role of amygdala orbitofrontal interactions in mediating normal emotion and psychopathology. ..
  8. Role of Central CRH in Stress-Induced Behavior
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  9. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of long term anxiety in primates will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of human affective and anxiety disorders. ..
  10. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of long term anxiety in primates will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of human affective and anxiety disorders. ..
  11. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of long term anxiety in primates will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of human affective and anxiety disorders. ..
  12. Brain Mechanisms Mediating Genetic Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depression
    Ned H Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  13. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..Understanding these behaviors may provide insight into mechanisms involved in the onset of stranger anxiety, temperamental differences in personality development, and development of anxiety-related psychopathology...
  14. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..Understanding these behaviors may provide insight into mechanisms involved in the onset of stranger anxiety, temperamental differences in personality development, and development of anxiety-related psychopathology...
  15. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIORS
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1990
    ..Additionally, we will assess HPA activity with plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone. This research should ascertain the extent to which endogenous brain CRF systems are involved in the mediation of stress-induced behavior...
  16. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIOR
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..The studies will provide important hypotheses regarding the role of CRF systems in mediating pathological anxiety, and other forms of human psychopathology. ..
  17. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIOR
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..The studies will provide important hypotheses regarding the role of CRF systems in mediating pathological anxiety, and other forms of human psychopathology. ..
  18. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of long term anxiety in primates will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of human affective and anxiety disorders. ..
  19. DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION OF EMOTION IN PRIMATES
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..These findings will provide insight into mechanisms mediating maladaptive responding in humans, which is characteristic of fear-related psychopathology. ..
  20. Role of Central CRH in Stress-Induced Behavior
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ....
  21. Role of Central CRH in Stress-Induced Behavior
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  22. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIORS
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..Additionally, we will assess HPA activity with plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone. This research should ascertain the extent to which endogenous brain CRF systems are involved in the mediation of stress-induced behavior...
  23. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIORS
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..Additionally, we will assess HPA activity with plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone. This research should ascertain the extent to which endogenous brain CRF systems are involved in the mediation of stress-induced behavior...
  24. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIOR
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The studies will provide important hypotheses regarding the role of CRF systems in mediating pathological anxiety, and other forms of human psychopathology. ..
  25. ROLE OF CENTRAL CRF IN STRESS-INDUCED BEHAVIORS
    Ned Kalin; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Additionally, we will assess HPA activity with plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone. This research should ascertain the extent to which endogenous brain CRF systems are involved in the mediation of stress-induced behavior...