John M Johnson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Texas Health Science Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Age of onset as a discriminator between alcoholic subtypes in a treatment-seeking outpatient population
    B A Johnson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas, San Antonio 78284 7792, USA
    Am J Addict 9:17-27. 2000
  2. pmc Local thermal control of the human cutaneous circulation
    John M Johnson
    Dept of Physiology, Univ of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio TX 78231, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 109:1229-38. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Exercise in a hot environment: the skin circulation
    J M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 20:29-39. 2010
  4. pmc How does skin blood flow get so high?
    John M Johnson
    J Physiol 577:768. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulatory and thermal control in the human cutaneous circulation
    John M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    Front Biosci (Schol Ed) 2:825-53. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint Sympathetic, sensory, and nonneuronal contributions to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling
    John M Johnson
    Dept of Physiology MSC 7756, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288:H1573-9. 2005
  7. pmc How do veins talk to arteries?
    John M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive MSC 7756, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Physiol 538:341. 2002
  8. doi request reprint Nitric oxide and receptors for VIP and PACAP in cutaneous active vasodilation during heat stress in humans
    Dean L Kellogg
    Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Audie L Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital Division, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 113:1512-8. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Neuropeptide Y antagonism reduces reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans
    Dan P Stephens
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287:H1404-9. 2004
  10. pmc The involvement of norepinephrine, neuropeptide Y, and nitric oxide in the cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating in humans
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 105:233-40. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. ncbi request reprint Age of onset as a discriminator between alcoholic subtypes in a treatment-seeking outpatient population
    B A Johnson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas, San Antonio 78284 7792, USA
    Am J Addict 9:17-27. 2000
    ..Yet, this clinical characterization would be clinically important if specific age of onset levels were found to be differentially sensitive to pharmacological and/or psychological treatments...
  2. pmc Local thermal control of the human cutaneous circulation
    John M Johnson
    Dept of Physiology, Univ of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio TX 78231, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 109:1229-38. 2010
    ..The mechanism for that transient vasodilation is not known, but it is inhibited by intact sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function and by intact sensory nerve function...
  3. doi request reprint Exercise in a hot environment: the skin circulation
    J M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 20:29-39. 2010
    ..Internal temperature rises to levels that limit exercise through central thermal effects, rather than loss of blood pressure or a reduction in blood flow to active muscle...
  4. pmc How does skin blood flow get so high?
    John M Johnson
    J Physiol 577:768. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Thermoregulatory and thermal control in the human cutaneous circulation
    John M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    Front Biosci (Schol Ed) 2:825-53. 2010
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Sympathetic, sensory, and nonneuronal contributions to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling
    John M Johnson
    Dept of Physiology MSC 7756, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288:H1573-9. 2005
    ..Later, a vasoconstriction develops with or without functional sensory or sympathetic nerves...
  7. pmc How do veins talk to arteries?
    John M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive MSC 7756, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Physiol 538:341. 2002
  8. doi request reprint Nitric oxide and receptors for VIP and PACAP in cutaneous active vasodilation during heat stress in humans
    Dean L Kellogg
    Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Audie L Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital Division, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 113:1512-8. 2012
    ..05). Because responses did not differ between l-NAME and combined treatment sites (P > 0.05), we conclude that VPAC2/PAC1 receptors require NO in series to effect AVD...
  9. ncbi request reprint Neuropeptide Y antagonism reduces reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans
    Dan P Stephens
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287:H1404-9. 2004
    ..05) but not at sites treated with Yoh + Pro + BIBP-3226 (P > 0.05). These results indicate that NPY participates in sympathetically mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans during whole body cooling...
  10. pmc The involvement of norepinephrine, neuropeptide Y, and nitric oxide in the cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating in humans
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 105:233-40. 2008
    ..Since VCN and NOS blockade in combination do not have an inhibition greater than either alone, these data suggest that VCN promote heat-induced vasodilation via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism...
  11. ncbi request reprint The role of baseline in the cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses during combined local and whole body cooling in humans
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 293:H3187-92. 2007
    ..05); the responses at those latter sites were not different (P > 0.05), suggesting that the baseline change in CVC with LC is important in the attenuation of reflex vasoconstrictor responses to WBC...
  12. doi request reprint Exogenous melatonin administration modifies cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to whole body skin cooling in humans
    Ken Aoki
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Pineal Res 44:141-8. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that by affecting the vasoconstrictor system, melatonin has a causal role in the nocturnal changes in body temperature and its control...
  13. ncbi request reprint Relative roles of local and reflex components in cutaneous vasoconstriction during skin cooling in humans
    Guy E Alvarez
    Department of Physiology MSC 7756, The University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Appl Physiol 100:2083-8. 2006
    ..6+/-2 vs. 42.4+/-8%; P<0.05). Hence, LC contributes importantly to the reduction in SkBF with body cooling, but also suppresses the reflex response, resulting in a nonadditive effect of these two components...
  14. pmc The involvement of heating rate and vasoconstrictor nerves in the cutaneous vasodilator response to skin warming
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296:H51-6. 2009
    ..05), suggesting the absence of tonic activity in those conditions and therefore that the adrenergic components of the responses in part 1 are via the stimulation of the transmitter release by LH...
  15. pmc Evidence for a role for vasoactive intestinal peptide in active vasodilatation in the cutaneous vasculature of humans
    Lee Ann T Bennett
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    J Physiol 552:223-32. 2003
    ..5 degrees C). VIP(10-28), alone or in combination with atropine, attenuated the increase in CVC during heat stress, suggesting an important role for VIP in AVD...
  16. pmc The involvement of nitric oxide in the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling in humans
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology MSC 7756, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    J Physiol 574:849-57. 2006
    ..These data suggest that the vasoconstriction with slow LC is due to a combination of increased noradrenaline release and decreased activity of both NOS per se and of process(es) downstream of NOS...
  17. ncbi request reprint Modification of cutaneous vasodilator response to heat stress by daytime exogenous melatonin administration
    Ken Aoki
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 291:R619-24. 2006
    ..Because control of SR and HR are also modified, a central action of melatonin is suggested...
  18. ncbi request reprint Role of sensory nerves in the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling in humans
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology MSC 7756, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 293:H784-9. 2007
    ....
  19. pmc Antagonism of soluble guanylyl cyclase attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local warming in humans
    Dean L Kellogg
    Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Audie L Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital Division, San Antonio, Texas, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 110:1406-13. 2011
    ..05 ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). sGC participates in neurogenic active vasodilation during heat stress and in the local response to direct skin warming...
  20. ncbi request reprint Cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to whole body skin cooling is altered by time of day
    Ken Aoki
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 3900, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 94:930-4. 2003
    ..Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between CVC and T(sk) is steeper in the PM compared with that in the AM...
  21. ncbi request reprint Rate dependency and role of nitric oxide in the vascular response to direct cooling in human skin
    Fumio Yamazaki
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas, USA
    J Appl Physiol 100:42-50. 2006
    ....
  22. doi request reprint Adrenergic control of the human cutaneous circulation
    Gary J Hodges
    Department of Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 34:829-39. 2009
    ....
  23. pmc VIP/PACAP receptor mediation of cutaneous active vasodilation during heat stress in humans
    Dean L Kellogg
    Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 109:95-100. 2010
    ..46 +/- 3%max, PACAP6-38 treated, P < 0.05). We conclude that VPAC2 and/or PAC1 receptor activation is involved in cutaneous active vasodilation in humans...
  24. ncbi request reprint Sympathetic nonnoradrenergic cutaneous vasoconstriction in women is associated with reproductive hormone status
    Dan P Stephens
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 282:H264-72. 2002
    ..After cooling, the effects of NE at YOPR sites were completely blocked. These data indicate that a nonnoradrenergic mechanism of reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction is present in women and is associated with reproductive hormone status...
  25. pmc Central command and the cutaneous vascular response to isometric exercise in heated humans
    Manabu Shibasaki
    Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, 7232 Greenville Ave Suite 435, Dallas, TX 75231, USA
    J Physiol 565:667-73. 2005
    ..These findings suggest that central command, as well as muscle metabo-sensitive afferent stimulation, contributes to forearm cutaneous vascular responses in heat stressed humans...
  26. ncbi request reprint Body temperature regulation during hemodialysis in long-term patients: is it time to change dialysate temperature prescription?
    Pablo E Pergola
    Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 3900, USA
    Am J Kidney Dis 44:155-65. 2004
    ..0 degrees C in all patients unless contraindicated...
  27. ncbi request reprint Cutaneous vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms in temperature regulation
    John M Johnson
    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
    Compr Physiol 4:33-89. 2014
    ..Factors that can modulate control mechanisms of the cutaneous vasculature, such as gender, aging, and clinical conditions, are discussed, as are nonthermoregulatory reflex modifiers of thermoregulatory cutaneous vascular responses...
  28. ncbi request reprint Influence of hyperoxia on skin vasomotor control in normothermic and heat-stressed humans
    Fumio Yamazaki
    Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, School of Health Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 103:2026-33. 2007
    ..We found no significant role for adrenergic mechanisms in hyperoxic vasoconstriction. Decreased production of vasodilator prostaglandins may play a role in hyperoxia-induced cutaneous vasoconstriction in heat-stressed humans...
  29. pmc The cardiovascular challenge of exercising in the heat
    Jose Gonzalez-Alonso
    Centre for Sports Medicine and Human Performance, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK
    J Physiol 586:45-53. 2008
    ..This review focuses on how the cardiovascular system is regulated when exercising in the heat and how restrictions in locomotor skeletal muscle and/or skin perfusion might limit athletic performance in hot environments...
  30. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of vasoconstriction with direct skin cooling in humans
    John M Johnson
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 292:H1690-1. 2007
  31. pmc Human medullary responses to cooling and rewarming the skin: a functional MRI study
    Robin M McAllen
    Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, Department of Anatomy, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:809-13. 2006
    ....

Research Grants9

  1. Vasomotor Mechanisms in the Human Cutaneous Circulation
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Lastly, we will test for a functional role for sympathetic transmitters other than norepinephrine and NPY I the vasoconstrictor control of the cutaneous circulation, with particular emphasis on a potential role for ATP. ..
  2. MENSTRUAL PHASE AND NEURAL CONTROL OF SKIN BLOOD FLOW
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..The role of prostaglandin synthesis in the upward shift of the thermoregulatory control of the active vasodilator system will also be evaluated. ..
  3. MENSTRUAL PHASE AND NEURAL CONTROL OF SKIN BLOOD FLOW
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..The role of prostaglandin synthesis in the upward shift of the thermoregulatory control of the active vasodilator system will also be evaluated. ..
  4. MENSTRUAL PHASE AND NEURAL CONTROL OF SKIN BLOOD FLOW
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..The role of prostaglandin synthesis in the upward shift of the thermoregulatory control of the active vasodilator system will also be evaluated. ..
  5. MENSTRUAL PHASE AND NEURAL CONTROL OF SKIN BLOOD FLOW
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The role of prostaglandin synthesis in the upward shift of the thermoregulatory control of the active vasodilator system will also be evaluated. ..
  6. Vasomotor Mechanisms in the Human Cutaneous Circulation
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Lastly, we will test for a functional role for sympathetic transmitters other than norepinephrine and NPY I the vasoconstrictor control of the cutaneous circulation, with particular emphasis on a potential role for ATP. ..
  7. Vasomotor Mechanisms in the Human Cutaneous Circulation
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Lastly, we will test for a functional role for sympathetic transmitters other than norepinephrine and NPY I the vasoconstrictor control of the cutaneous circulation, with particular emphasis on a potential role for ATP. ..
  8. Vasomotor Mechanisms in the Human Cutaneous Circulation
    John Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Lastly, we will test for a functional role for sympathetic transmitters other than norepinephrine and NPY I the vasoconstrictor control of the cutaneous circulation, with particular emphasis on a potential role for ATP. ..