Sharon A Jansa

Summary

Affiliation: University of Minnesota
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Phylogeny of muroid rodents: relationships within and among major lineages as determined by IRBP gene sequences
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 31:256-76. 2004
  2. doi request reprint The early diversification history of didelphid marsupials: a window into South america's "splendid isolation"
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota
    Evolution 68:684-95. 2014
  3. pmc Adaptive evolution of the venom-targeted vWF protein in opossums that eat pitvipers
    Sharon A Jansa
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and J F Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20997. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint Different patterns of selection on the nuclear genes IRBP and DMP-1 affect the efficiency but not the outcome of phylogeny estimation for didelphid marsupials
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, 55108, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 38:363-80. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint The pattern and timing of diversification of Philippine endemic rodents: evidence from mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, S A J, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA
    Syst Biol 55:73-88. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Base-compositional heterogeneity in the RAG1 locus among didelphid marsupials: implications for phylogenetic inference and the evolution of GC content
    Karl F Gruber
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA
    Syst Biol 56:83-96. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Hidden diversity in the Andes: comparison of species delimitation methods in montane marsupials
    Thomas C Giarla
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, St Paul, MN 55108, USA J F Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, St Paul, MN 55108, USA Electronic address
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 70:137-51. 2014
  8. doi request reprint Snake-venom resistance as a mammalian trophic adaptation: lessons from didelphid marsupials
    Robert S Voss
    Department of Mammalogy, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:822-37. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Tests for positive selection on immune and reproductive genes in closely related species of the murine genus mus
    Sharon A Jansa
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 6098, USA edu
    J Mol Evol 56:294-307. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic relationships in the genus mus, based on paternally, maternally, and biparentally inherited characters
    Barbara L Lundrigan
    Michigan State University Museum and Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 1045, USA
    Syst Biol 51:410-31. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. ncbi request reprint Phylogeny of muroid rodents: relationships within and among major lineages as determined by IRBP gene sequences
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 31:256-76. 2004
    ..A preliminary examination of molar tooth morphology on the resulting phylogeny suggests the triserial murid molar pattern as conceived by evolved at least three times during the course of muroid evolution...
  2. doi request reprint The early diversification history of didelphid marsupials: a window into South america's "splendid isolation"
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota
    Evolution 68:684-95. 2014
    ..Potentially falsifying observations that could help discriminate between the proposed alternative explanations for didelphid mass extinction may be obtainable from diversification analyses of other sympatric mammalian groups. ..
  3. pmc Adaptive evolution of the venom-targeted vWF protein in opossums that eat pitvipers
    Sharon A Jansa
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and J F Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20997. 2011
    ..However, in the arms race implied by our results, venomous snakes are prey, and their venom has a correspondingly defensive function in addition to its usual trophic role...
  4. ncbi request reprint Different patterns of selection on the nuclear genes IRBP and DMP-1 affect the efficiency but not the outcome of phylogeny estimation for didelphid marsupials
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, 55108, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 38:363-80. 2006
    ..Thus, for these two genes, relaxed functional constraints and positive selection appear to improve the efficiency of phylogenetic estimation without compromising its accuracy...
  5. ncbi request reprint The pattern and timing of diversification of Philippine endemic rodents: evidence from mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences
    Sharon A Jansa
    Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, S A J, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA
    Syst Biol 55:73-88. 2006
    ..Biogeography; divergence date estimation; mitochondrial DNA; molecular systematics; Murinae; nuclear exon; Philippines; phylogeny.]...
  6. ncbi request reprint Base-compositional heterogeneity in the RAG1 locus among didelphid marsupials: implications for phylogenetic inference and the evolution of GC content
    Karl F Gruber
    Bell Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA
    Syst Biol 56:83-96. 2007
    ..Both mutation rate and substitution rate are higher in GC-rich didelphid taxa, observations consistent with RAG1 sequences having experienced a higher rate of recombination in the convergent lineages...
  7. doi request reprint Hidden diversity in the Andes: comparison of species delimitation methods in montane marsupials
    Thomas C Giarla
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, St Paul, MN 55108, USA J F Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford Circle, St Paul, MN 55108, USA Electronic address
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 70:137-51. 2014
    ..venustus haplotypes and on the efficiency of the rjMCMC algorithm. Comparisons of results from datasets with different numbers of loci revealed that some cryptic lineages could be confidently delimited with as few as two loci. ..
  8. doi request reprint Snake-venom resistance as a mammalian trophic adaptation: lessons from didelphid marsupials
    Robert S Voss
    Department of Mammalogy, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:822-37. 2012
    ..Unfortunately, evolutionary inference is currently limited by ignorance about many relevant facts that can only be provided by future research...
  9. ncbi request reprint Tests for positive selection on immune and reproductive genes in closely related species of the murine genus mus
    Sharon A Jansa
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 6098, USA edu
    J Mol Evol 56:294-307. 2003
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic relationships in the genus mus, based on paternally, maternally, and biparentally inherited characters
    Barbara L Lundrigan
    Michigan State University Museum and Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 1045, USA
    Syst Biol 51:410-31. 2002
    ..This appears to reflect a localized homoplasy in one partition obscuring the phylogenetic signal from another, rather than differences in gene or genome histories...