John Jaenike

Summary

Affiliation: University of Rochester
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Science 329:212-5. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Association between Wolbachia and Spiroplasma within Drosophila neotestacea: an emerging symbiotic mutualism?
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:414-25. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary dynamics of a spatially structured host-parasite association: Drosophila innubila and male-killing Wolbachia
    Kelly A Dyer
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 59:1518-28. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Expression and modulation of embryonic male-killing in Drosophila innubila: opportunities for multilevel selection
    Kelly A Dyer
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 59:838-48. 2005
  5. doi request reprint Infectious adaptation: potential host range of a defensive endosymbiont in Drosophila
    Tamara S Haselkorn
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 14627, USA
    Evolution 67:934-45. 2013
  6. doi request reprint Maintenance of a male-killing Wolbachia in Drosophila innubila by male-killing dependent and male-killing independent mechanisms
    Robert L Unckless
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 66:678-89. 2012
  7. pmc Asymmetrical reinforcement and Wolbachia infection in Drosophila
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e325. 2006
  8. doi request reprint The mushroom habitat as an ecological arena for global exchange of Wolbachia
    Julie K Stahlhut
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:1940-52. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Defensive endosymbionts: a cryptic trophic level in community ecology
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:150-5. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint Spontaneous emergence of a new Wolbachia phenotype
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 61:2244-52. 2007

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. doi request reprint Adaptation via symbiosis: recent spread of a Drosophila defensive symbiont
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Science 329:212-5. 2010
    ..These findings demonstrate the profound and potentially rapid effects of defensive symbionts, which are increasingly recognized as major players in the ecology of species interactions...
  2. doi request reprint Association between Wolbachia and Spiroplasma within Drosophila neotestacea: an emerging symbiotic mutualism?
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:414-25. 2010
    ..If selection acts on the combination of these two endosymbionts, they may be in the early stages of evolution of a more complex, cooperative association...
  3. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary dynamics of a spatially structured host-parasite association: Drosophila innubila and male-killing Wolbachia
    Kelly A Dyer
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 59:1518-28. 2005
    ..Overall, our data suggest that the association between D. innubila and male-killing Wolbachia is ecologically dynamic within local populations, but evolutionarily coherent across the species as a whole...
  4. ncbi request reprint Expression and modulation of embryonic male-killing in Drosophila innubila: opportunities for multilevel selection
    Kelly A Dyer
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 59:838-48. 2005
    ..innubila at the host population level suggest that selection among cytoplasmic lineages is likely to overwhelm the results of selection within lineages...
  5. doi request reprint Infectious adaptation: potential host range of a defensive endosymbiont in Drosophila
    Tamara S Haselkorn
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 14627, USA
    Evolution 67:934-45. 2013
    ..neotestacea and in which females are rendered completely sterile by nematode parasitism. Thus, a major adaptation within D. putrida could arise via lateral transmission of a heritable symbiont from D. neotestacea...
  6. doi request reprint Maintenance of a male-killing Wolbachia in Drosophila innubila by male-killing dependent and male-killing independent mechanisms
    Robert L Unckless
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 66:678-89. 2012
    ..Thus, this MK endosymbiont can provide direct, MK-independent fitness benefits to infected female hosts in addition to possible benefits mediated via MK...
  7. pmc Asymmetrical reinforcement and Wolbachia infection in Drosophila
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e325. 2006
    ..Given the widespread occurrence of Wolbachia among insects, it thus appears that there are multiple ways by which these endosymbionts may directly and indirectly contribute to reproductive isolation and speciation...
  8. doi request reprint The mushroom habitat as an ecological arena for global exchange of Wolbachia
    Julie K Stahlhut
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:1940-52. 2010
    ..Our results suggest that horizontal transmission of Wolbachia can be influenced by host ecology, thus leading to partial restriction of Wolbachia strains or strain groups to particular guilds of insects...
  9. doi request reprint Defensive endosymbionts: a cryptic trophic level in community ecology
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:150-5. 2011
    ..The recent spread of Spiroplasma in natural populations of D. neotestacea coincides with a decline in the prevalence of Howardula parasitism in the wild...
  10. ncbi request reprint Spontaneous emergence of a new Wolbachia phenotype
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 61:2244-52. 2007
    ..MK in D. subquinaria is unusual in that the male offspring of infected females die during the larval stage, not as embryos. These findings suggest that MK and CI may share a similar underlying molecular basis...
  11. pmc Wolbachia as populations within individual insects: causes and consequences of density variation in natural populations
    Robert L Unckless
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:2805-11. 2009
    ..Finally, we suggest three alternative hypotheses to account for the approximately lognormal distribution of Wolbachia density among wild flies...
  12. doi request reprint X chromosome drive
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Curr Biol 18:R508-11. 2008
  13. pmc Interspecific transmission of endosymbiotic Spiroplasma by mites
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Biol Lett 3:23-5. 2007
    ..However, the transmission rate of the infection from recipient flies to their offspring was low, perhaps due to low Spiroplasma density in the recipient flies...
  14. ncbi request reprint Fighting back against male-killers
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:167-9. 2007
    ..Their results provide unambiguous evidence of genetic variation for resistance to male-killers. A possible consequence of such variation is that male-killing might appear and disappear quickly on an evolutionary timescale...
  15. pmc Evolutionarily stable infection by a male-killing endosymbiont in Drosophila innubila: molecular evidence from the host and parasite genomes
    Kelly A Dyer
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Genetics 168:1443-55. 2004
    ..innubila-Wolbachia association is likely at a stable equilibrium that is maintained by imperfect maternal transmission of the bacteria rather than partial resistance in the host species...
  16. doi request reprint Population genetics of beneficial heritable symbionts
    John Jaenike
    University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 27:226-32. 2012
    ..The time is ripe for the development of a coherent theory of the 'population genetics' of beneficial heritable symbionts...
  17. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services"
    John Jaenike
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 0211, USA
    Science 316:1285; author reply 1285. 2007
    ..Thus, long-term projections of fisheries collapse are highly dependent on the specific statistical model used...
  18. ncbi request reprint Ecological genetics of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila falleni: a pleiotropic link to nematode parasitism
    Irene Dombeck
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Evolution 58:587-96. 2004
    ..Thus, selection exerted by nematode parasites may influence pigmentation patterns and other, genetically correlated traits in natural populations D. falleni...