K R Hultine

Summary

Affiliation: University of Utah
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Influence of soil texture on hydraulic properties and water relations of a dominant warm-desert phreatophyte
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 26:313-23. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Population structure, physiology and ecohydrological impacts of dioecious riparian tree species of western North America
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 154:85-93. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Gender-specific patterns of aboveground allocation, canopy conductance and water use in a dominant riparian tree species: Acer negundo
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 28:1383-94. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Ecophysiology of riparian cottonwood and willow before, during, and after two years of soil water removal
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Ecol Appl 20:347-61. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Transpiration and hydraulic strategies in a piñon-juniper woodland
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Ecol Appl 18:911-27. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Seasonal variations in moisture use in a piñon-juniper woodland
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 153:787-98. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Differential summer water use by Pinus edulis and Juniperus osteosperma reflects contrasting hydraulic characteristics
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 27:1711-20. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Hydraulic redistribution by deep roots of a Chihuahuan Desert phreatophyte
    K R Hultine
    School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Tree Physiol 23:353-60. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Contrasting patterns of hydraulic redistribution in three desert phreatophytes
    K R Hultine
    School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Oecologia 135:167-75. 2003

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Influence of soil texture on hydraulic properties and water relations of a dominant warm-desert phreatophyte
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 26:313-23. 2006
    ..Information on the combined importance of xylem and rhizosphere constraints to leaf water supply across soil texture gradients provides insight into processes controlling plant water balance and larger scale hydrologic processes...
  2. ncbi request reprint Population structure, physiology and ecohydrological impacts of dioecious riparian tree species of western North America
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 154:85-93. 2007
    ..A more thorough understanding of the mechanisms that underlie population structure of dominant riparian tree species will enable us to better predict global change impacts on vegetation and water cycling at multiple scales...
  3. ncbi request reprint Gender-specific patterns of aboveground allocation, canopy conductance and water use in a dominant riparian tree species: Acer negundo
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 28:1383-94. 2008
    ..These results improve our capacity to describe the adaptive forces that shape the spatial distribution of male and female trees in dioecious species, and their consequences for ecohydrological processes in riparian ecosystems...
  4. ncbi request reprint Ecophysiology of riparian cottonwood and willow before, during, and after two years of soil water removal
    K R Hultine
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Ecol Appl 20:347-61. 2010
    ..These data shed light on the linkage between soil water deficits and ecophysiological processes of threatened riparian forests given potential land-use and long-term drought impacts on freshwater resources...
  5. ncbi request reprint Transpiration and hydraulic strategies in a piñon-juniper woodland
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
    Ecol Appl 18:911-27. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Seasonal variations in moisture use in a piñon-juniper woodland
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Oecologia 153:787-98. 2007
    ..edulis and J. osteosperma are differentially sensitive to summer precipitation and are discussed in the light of potential changes in the seasonality of precipitation associated with climate change...
  7. ncbi request reprint Differential summer water use by Pinus edulis and Juniperus osteosperma reflects contrasting hydraulic characteristics
    A G West
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
    Tree Physiol 27:1711-20. 2007
    ..In contrast, J. osteosperma failed to exploit light summer rain events but was able to extract deep soil water at low water potentials...
  8. ncbi request reprint Hydraulic redistribution by deep roots of a Chihuahuan Desert phreatophyte
    K R Hultine
    School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Tree Physiol 23:353-60. 2003
    ..Hydraulic descent may be an important component of the water balance of phreatophytic trees by facilitating root growth in deep soil layers and by transferring water away from shallow-rooted competitors...
  9. ncbi request reprint Contrasting patterns of hydraulic redistribution in three desert phreatophytes
    K R Hultine
    School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Oecologia 135:167-75. 2003
    ..Species differences in nocturnal root function may have significant impacts on ecosystem hydrological fluxes, and should be considered when scaling fluxes to catchment, landscape, and regional levels...