R B Huey

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroscience and evolution. Snake sodium channels resist TTX arrest
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Science 297:1289-90. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Hypoxia, global warming, and terrestrial late Permian extinctions
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 308:398-401. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Lizard thermal biology: do genders differ?
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Am Nat 170:473-8. 2007
  4. pmc Effects of age and gender on success and death of mountaineers on Mount Everest
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Biol Lett 3:498-500. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Sexual size dimorphism in a Drosophila clade, the D. obscura group
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Zoology (Jena) 109:318-30. 2006
  6. pmc Climate warming and environmental sex determination in tuatara: the last of the Sphenodontians?
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2181-3. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Bart's familiar quotations: the enduring biological wisdom of George A. Bartholomew
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 81:519-25. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Behavioral drive versus behavioral inertia in evolution: a null model approach
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Am Nat 161:357-66. 2003
  9. pmc Why tropical forest lizards are vulnerable to climate warming
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1939-48. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint Partial thermoregulatory compensation by a rapidly evolving invasive species along a latitudinal cline
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Ecology 90:1715-20. 2009

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. ncbi request reprint Neuroscience and evolution. Snake sodium channels resist TTX arrest
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Science 297:1289-90. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Hypoxia, global warming, and terrestrial late Permian extinctions
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 308:398-401. 2005
    ..It also might have delayed ecosystem recovery after the mass extinction...
  3. ncbi request reprint Lizard thermal biology: do genders differ?
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Am Nat 170:473-8. 2007
    ..For desert lizards, gender differences in thermal biology are the exception, not the rule. Nevertheless, gender differences should be examined when feasible because exceptions--though likely rare--could be biologically interesting...
  4. pmc Effects of age and gender on success and death of mountaineers on Mount Everest
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Biol Lett 3:498-500. 2007
    ..On Mount Everest, phenotypic selection appears blind to gender but favours young mountaineers...
  5. ncbi request reprint Sexual size dimorphism in a Drosophila clade, the D. obscura group
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Zoology (Jena) 109:318-30. 2006
    ..obscura data may be limited by low statistical power...
  6. pmc Climate warming and environmental sex determination in tuatara: the last of the Sphenodontians?
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2181-3. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Bart's familiar quotations: the enduring biological wisdom of George A. Bartholomew
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 81:519-25. 2008
    ..Here we present some of his most insightful and important quotations, group them thematically, and comment on their original context and their continuing relevance...
  8. ncbi request reprint Behavioral drive versus behavioral inertia in evolution: a null model approach
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Am Nat 161:357-66. 2003
    ....
  9. pmc Why tropical forest lizards are vulnerable to climate warming
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, PO Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1939-48. 2009
    ..Forest lizards are key components of tropical ecosystems, but appear vulnerable to the cascading physiological and ecological effects of climate warming, even though rates of tropical warming may be relatively low...
  10. ncbi request reprint Partial thermoregulatory compensation by a rapidly evolving invasive species along a latitudinal cline
    Raymond B Huey
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Ecology 90:1715-20. 2009
    ..The observed pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic shifts in Tb may be an evolutionary driver of latitudinal clines in this invading species...
  11. ncbi request reprint Rapid evolution of a geographic cline in size in an introduced fly
    R B Huey
    Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Science 287:308-9. 2000
    ..Nevertheless, different wing sections dominate the New versus Old World clines. Thus, the evolution of geographic variation in wing length has been predictable, but the means by which the cline is achieved is contingent...
  12. ncbi request reprint Limits to human performance: elevated risks on high mountains
    R B Huey
    Department of Zoology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3115-9. 2001
    ..Although these patterns are based on non-experimental and uncontrolled data, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that increasing altitude is associated with decreased success and with increased risk of death...
  13. ncbi request reprint Rapid evolution of wing size clines in Drosophila subobscura
    G W Gilchrist
    Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 5805, USA
    Genetica 112:273-86. 2001
    ..02 haldanes (2800 darwins), a value similar in magnitude to the synchronic estimates from the extremes of the cline. This paper represents an expanded analysis of data partially presented in Huey et al. (2000)...
  14. doi request reprint Ecology. Putting the heat on tropical animals
    Joshua J Tewksbury
    Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 320:1296-7. 2008
  15. pmc Impacts of climate warming on terrestrial ectotherms across latitude
    Curtis A Deutsch
    Program on Climate Change and Department of Oceanography and Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:6668-72. 2008
    ..Our analyses imply that, in the absence of ameliorating factors such as migration and adaptation, the greatest extinction risks from global warming may be in the tropics, where biological diversity is also greatest...
  16. ncbi request reprint Parental and developmental temperature effects on the thermal dependence of fitness in Drosophila melanogaster
    G W Gilchrist
    Department of Zoology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York 13699 5805, USA
    Evolution 55:209-14. 2001
    ..Flies with hot parents have high fitness seemingly because their own offspring develop relatively quickly, not because they have higher fecundity early in life...
  17. ncbi request reprint Locomotor performance of Drosophila melanogaster: interactions among developmental and adult temperatures, age, and geography
    P Gibert
    Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1800, USA
    Evolution 55:205-9. 2001
    ..Thus, walking performance is highly dynamic phenotypically, complicating potential attempts to predict responses to selection on performance...
  18. ncbi request reprint Thermodynamics constrains the evolution of insect population growth rates: "warmer is better"
    M R Frazier
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 1800, USA
    Am Nat 168:512-20. 2006
    ..Our findings suggest that adaptation to temperature inevitably alters the population dynamics of insects. This result has broad evolutionary and ecological consequences...
  19. ncbi request reprint Life history consequences of temperature transients in Drosophila melanogaster
    Michael E Dillon
    Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:2897-904. 2007
    ..However, the severity and especially the timing of the transient will probably determine the likelihood of carry-over effects as well as its effect on fitness...
  20. ncbi request reprint A time series of evolution in action: a latitudinal cline in wing size in South American Drosophila subobscura
    George W Gilchrist
    Department of Biology, Box 8795, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 8795, USA
    Evolution 58:768-80. 2004
    ..Thus, although the evolution of overall wing size is predictable on a geographic scale (at least for females), the evolution of size of particular wing components is decidedly not...
  21. doi request reprint Thermodynamic effects on organismal performance: is hotter better?
    Michael J Angilletta
    Department of Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:197-206. 2010
    ..Nevertheless, the thermodynamic effect on maximal performance varies greatly among traits and taxa, suggesting the need to develop a more sophisticated view of thermodynamic constraints...
  22. ncbi request reprint The direct response of Drosophila melanogaster to selection on knockdown temperature
    G W Gilchrist
    Department of Zoology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1800, USA
    Heredity (Edinb) 83:15-29. 1999
    ..The global polymorphism for knockdown temperature, coupled with the ease of selective removal of either mode, suggests that genetic variation for knockdown temperature may be maintained by natural selection...
  23. ncbi request reprint Mountaineering in thin air. Patterns of death and of weather at high altitude
    R B Huey
    Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 502:225-36. 2001
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint 2002 Sewall Wright Award. Linda Partridge
    Raymond B Huey
    University of Washington, USA
    Am Nat 161:following cover. 2003
  25. doi request reprint Why "suboptimal" is optimal: Jensen's inequality and ectotherm thermal preferences
    Tara Laine Martin
    Department of Biology, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California 91711, USA
    Am Nat 171:E102-18. 2008
    ..Asymmetric (left-skewed) T(b) distributions reduce the magnitude of the optimal shift but do not eliminate it. Comparative data (insects, lizards) support key predictions. Thus, "suboptimal" is optimal...
  26. ncbi request reprint Thermal preference of Caenorhabditis elegans: a null model and empirical tests
    Jennifer L Anderson
    Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97402, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:3107-16. 2007
    ..These results demonstrate the value of an explicit null model of thermal effects and highlight problems in the standard model of C. elegans thermotaxis, showing the value of using natural isolates for tests of complex natural behaviours...
  27. ncbi request reprint Global genetic change tracks global climate warming in Drosophila subobscura
    Joan Balanyà
    Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, Barcelona 08071, Spain
    Science 313:1773-5. 2006
    ..Thus, genetic change in this fly is tracking climate warming and is doing so globally...
  28. ncbi request reprint Climbing a triassic Mount Everest: into thinner air
    Raymond B Huey
    JAMA 294:1761-2. 2005
  29. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary pace of chromosomal polymorphism in colonizing populations of Drosophila subobscura: an evolutionary time series
    Joan Balanyà
    Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, Barcelona 08071, Spain
    Evolution 57:1837-45. 2003
    ..However, five arrangements in South America show directional, continentwide shifts in frequency. Overall, the initial consistency of clinal evolutionary trajectories seen in the first surveys seems not to have been maintained...