A K Howe

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Regulation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation and interaction with Abl by protein kinase A and cell adhesion
    Alan K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:38121-6. 2002
  2. ncbi Cell adhesion regulates the interaction between Nck and p21-activated kinase
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 276:14541-4. 2001
  3. ncbi Anchorage-dependent ERK signaling--mechanisms and consequences
    Alan K Howe
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Campus Box 7365, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 3765, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 12:30-5. 2002
  4. ncbi Regulation of anchorage-dependent signal transduction by protein kinase A and p21-activated kinase
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 2:593-600. 2000
  5. ncbi Cell adhesion molecules, signal transduction and cell growth
    A E Aplin
    Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, NC 27599, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 11:737-44. 1999
  6. ncbi Integrin regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor signaling to mitogen-activated protein kinases
    R L Juliano
    Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7365, USA
    Methods Enzymol 333:151-63. 2001
  7. ncbi Distinct mechanisms mediate the initial and sustained phases of integrin-mediated activation of the Raf/MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 273:27268-74. 1998
  8. ncbi Inhibition of PKA blocks fibroblast migration in response to growth factors
    M L Edin
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 25799 7365, USA
    Exp Cell Res 270:214-22. 2001
  9. pmc Spatial restriction of alpha4 integrin phosphorylation regulates lamellipodial stability and alpha4beta1-dependent cell migration
    Lawrence E Goldfinger
    Department of Cell Biology, Division of Vascular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N Torrey Pines Road, VB 2 La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
    J Cell Biol 162:731-41. 2003
  10. ncbi Regulation of actin-based cell migration by cAMP/PKA
    Alan K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, Vermont Cancer Center, University of Vermont, HSRF 322, Burlington 05405 0075, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1692:159-74. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi Regulation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation and interaction with Abl by protein kinase A and cell adhesion
    Alan K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:38121-6. 2002
    ..These data establish a new biochemical link between cell adhesion and regulation of VASP proteins and provide the first demonstration of a regulated interaction between VASP and Abl in mammalian cells...
  2. ncbi Cell adhesion regulates the interaction between Nck and p21-activated kinase
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 276:14541-4. 2001
    ..The ability of cell adhesion to regulate PAK phosphorylation and interaction with Nck may contribute to the anchorage-dependence of PAK activation as well as to the localization of activated PAK within a cell...
  3. ncbi Anchorage-dependent ERK signaling--mechanisms and consequences
    Alan K Howe
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Campus Box 7365, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 3765, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 12:30-5. 2002
    ..Recent work has demonstrated that cell adhesion can regulate ERK signaling at several checkpoints and has begun to define the mechanism and consequences associated with anchorage-dependent effects on the ERK cascade...
  4. ncbi Regulation of anchorage-dependent signal transduction by protein kinase A and p21-activated kinase
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 2:593-600. 2000
    ..These observations indicate that PKA and PAK are important regulators of anchorage-dependent signal transduction...
  5. ncbi Cell adhesion molecules, signal transduction and cell growth
    A E Aplin
    Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, NC 27599, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 11:737-44. 1999
    ..These actions appear to depend on the ability of CAMs to initiate the formation of organized structures that permit the efficient flow of information...
  6. ncbi Integrin regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor signaling to mitogen-activated protein kinases
    R L Juliano
    Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7365, USA
    Methods Enzymol 333:151-63. 2001
    ..Harsh treatment of cells, for example, prolonged suspension culture, may result in irreversible nonphysiological effects in some types of cells...
  7. ncbi Distinct mechanisms mediate the initial and sustained phases of integrin-mediated activation of the Raf/MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade
    A K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7365, USA
    J Biol Chem 273:27268-74. 1998
    ....
  8. ncbi Inhibition of PKA blocks fibroblast migration in response to growth factors
    M L Edin
    Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 25799 7365, USA
    Exp Cell Res 270:214-22. 2001
    ..Our data show that intermediate or well-controlled levels of PKA activity are required for optimal growth factor-stimulated migration in fibroblasts. PKA may play an important role in the signaling processes that lead to motility...
  9. pmc Spatial restriction of alpha4 integrin phosphorylation regulates lamellipodial stability and alpha4beta1-dependent cell migration
    Lawrence E Goldfinger
    Department of Cell Biology, Division of Vascular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N Torrey Pines Road, VB 2 La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
    J Cell Biol 162:731-41. 2003
    ..These results show that topographically specific integrin phosphorylation can control cell migration and polarization by spatial segregation of adaptor protein binding...
  10. ncbi Regulation of actin-based cell migration by cAMP/PKA
    Alan K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology, Vermont Cancer Center, University of Vermont, HSRF 322, Burlington 05405 0075, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1692:159-74. 2004
    ..This review discusses the growing literature that supports the hypothesis that PKA plays a central role in cytoskeletal regulation and cell migration...
  11. pmc Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration
    Alan K Howe
    Department of Pharmacology and the Vermont Cancer Center, The University of Vermont, 149 Beaumont Avenue, HSRF 322, Burlington, VT 05405 0075, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14320-5. 2005
    ..These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement...
  12. ncbi Dynamic fibroblast cytoskeletal response to subcutaneous tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo
    Helene M Langevin
    Department of Neurology, Vermont Cancer Center, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Given C423, 89 Beaumont Ave, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 288:C747-56. 2005
    ....
  13. ncbi Pressure elevation slows the fibroblast response to wound healing
    Andrew C Stanley
    Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, 05405, USA
    J Vasc Surg 42:546-51. 2005
    ..We hypothesized that wounded cells maintained at different atmospheric pressures heal at different rates and that pressure would adversely affect the processes necessary for wound healing...
  14. ncbi Subcutaneous tissue fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling induced by acupuncture: evidence for a mechanotransduction-based mechanism
    Helene M Langevin
    Department of Neurology, Vermont Cancer Center, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont 05405, USA
    J Cell Physiol 207:767-74. 2006
    ....
  15. pmc Oxidation state governs structural transitions in peroxiredoxin II that correlate with cell cycle arrest and recovery
    Timothy J Phalen
    Department of Pathology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
    J Cell Biol 175:779-89. 2006
    ..We propose a model in which Prxs function as peroxide dosimeters in subcellular processes that involve redox cycling, with hyperoxidation controlling structural transitions that alert cells of perturbations in peroxide homeostasis...