M Hollins

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Detecting the emergence of chronic pain in sickle cell disease
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 43:1082-93. 2012
  2. pmc Changes in pain from a repetitive thermal stimulus: the roles of adaptation and sensitization
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Pain 152:1583-90. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Somesthetic senses
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 61:243-71. 2010
  4. pmc Perceived intensity and unpleasantness of cutaneous and auditory stimuli: an evaluation of the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Pain 141:215-21. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint The coding of roughness
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599, USA
    Can J Exp Psychol 61:184-95. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Somatosensory coding of roughness: the effect of texture adaptation in direct and indirect touch
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Neurosci 26:5582-8. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Factors contributing to the integration of textural qualities: evidence from virtual surfaces
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 22:193-206. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Haptic perception of virtual surfaces: scaling subjective qualities and interstimulus differences
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, Davie Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Perception 33:1001-19. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Perceived intensity of vibrotactile stimuli: the role of mechanoreceptive channels
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 13:273-86. 1996
  10. ncbi request reprint Imposed vibration influences perceived tactile smoothness
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Perception 29:1455-65. 2000

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Detecting the emergence of chronic pain in sickle cell disease
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 43:1082-93. 2012
    ..Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited hematological disease marked by intense pain. Early in life the pain is episodic, but it becomes increasingly chronic in many cases. Little is known about this emergence of a chronic pain state...
  2. pmc Changes in pain from a repetitive thermal stimulus: the roles of adaptation and sensitization
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Pain 152:1583-90. 2011
    ..Several lines of evidence thus point to the conclusion that adaptation and sensitization occur at early stages of sensory information processing...
  3. doi request reprint Somesthetic senses
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 61:243-71. 2010
    ....
  4. pmc Perceived intensity and unpleasantness of cutaneous and auditory stimuli: an evaluation of the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Pain 141:215-21. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint The coding of roughness
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599, USA
    Can J Exp Psychol 61:184-95. 2007
    ..Movement is necessary to the perception of these textures, and vibrotactile adaptation interferes with it. The code is an intensitive one (i.e., the amount of activity in Pacinian afferents)...
  6. ncbi request reprint Somatosensory coding of roughness: the effect of texture adaptation in direct and indirect touch
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Neurosci 26:5582-8. 2006
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Factors contributing to the integration of textural qualities: evidence from virtual surfaces
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 22:193-206. 2005
    ..The fact that-unlike stickiness-hardness, roughness, and perceived vibration intensity are all increasing functions of surface-normal forces may facilitate their integration into a Euclidean space, in both direct and indirect touch...
  8. ncbi request reprint Haptic perception of virtual surfaces: scaling subjective qualities and interstimulus differences
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, Davie Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Perception 33:1001-19. 2004
    ..The results fell between these two sets of predictions, indicating only modest integration of surface properties examined with indirect touch...
  9. ncbi request reprint Perceived intensity of vibrotactile stimuli: the role of mechanoreceptive channels
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 13:273-86. 1996
    ..It is concluded that an understanding of perceived vibrotactile intensity requires knowledge of the signals in vibrotactile channels, and of the interactions between those channels...
  10. ncbi request reprint Imposed vibration influences perceived tactile smoothness
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Perception 29:1455-65. 2000
    ..The results suggest that vibrotaction contributes to texture perception, and that, at least within the Pacinian channel, it does so by means of an intensity code...
  11. ncbi request reprint Vibrotaction and texture perception
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Behav Brain Res 135:51-6. 2002
    ..Taken together, these lines of evidence support the view that vibrotaction is both necessary and sufficient for the perception of fine tactile textures...
  12. ncbi request reprint Evidence for the duplex theory of tactile texture perception
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Percept Psychophys 62:695-705. 2000
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Vibrotactile adaptation impairs discrimination of fine, but not coarse, textures
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 18:253-62. 2001
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in perceptual space for tactile textures: evidence from multidimensional scaling
    M Hollins
    Department of Psychology, CB 3270, Davie Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Percept Psychophys 62:1534-44. 2000
    ..We conclude that the sticky/slippery dimension is perceptually weighted less than the rough/smooth and soft/hard dimensions, materially contributing to the structure of perceptual space only in some individuals...
  15. ncbi request reprint A ratio code for vibrotactile pitch
    E A Roy
    Department of Psychology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 15:134-45. 1998
    ..Pitch changes resulting from vibrotactile adaptation were directionally consistent with our ratio model: pitch was slightly increased by adaptation to a 25 Hz stimulus, and slightly decreased by 200 Hz adaptation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Reduction of TMD pain by high-frequency vibration: a spatial and temporal analysis
    Elizabeth A Roy
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Pain 101:267-74. 2003
    ....
  17. pmc The vibrations of texture
    Sliman J BensmaIa
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Somatosens Mot Res 20:33-43. 2003
    ..On the other hand, the effects of speed on roughness match those of speed on power. We propose that the roughness of a fine surface (spatial period<200 microm) is a function of the Pacinian-weighted power of the vibrations it elicits...
  18. ncbi request reprint Vibratory antinociception: effects of vibration amplitude and frequency
    Mark Hollins
    Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Pain 4:381-91. 2003
    ..Combining the results of the 2 studies permitted the conclusion that signals in multiple vibrotactile channels are able to modulate nociception. No one mechanoreceptive channel appears to have a privileged role...
  19. ncbi request reprint Pacinian representations of fine surface texture
    Sliman Bensmaïa
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Percept Psychophys 67:842-54. 2005
    ..Our results further suggested that the textural information conveyed by the Pacinian system concerns surface roughness and, possibly, stickiness...
  20. ncbi request reprint Vibrotactile intensity and frequency information in the pacinian system: a psychophysical model
    Sliman Bensmaïa
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Percept Psychophys 67:828-41. 2005
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Generalized vibrotactile allodynia in a patient with temporomandibular disorder
    R B Fillingim
    Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 35279 1170, USA
    Pain 78:75-8. 1998
    ..Administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dextromethorphan (DM), but not vehicle, attenuated the vibration-induced pain at both sites...