Ralph Haygood

Summary

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives
    Ralph Haygood
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1879-86. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Sexual conflict and protein polymorphism
    Ralph Haygood
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Evolution 58:1414-23. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Coexistence in MacArthur-style consumer-resource models
    Ralph Haygood
    Center for Population Biology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Theor Popul Biol 61:215-23. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Proceedings of the SMBE Tri-National Young Investigators' Workshop 2005. Mutation rate and the cost of complexity
    Ralph Haygood
    Biology Department, Duke University, NC, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 23:957-63. 2006
  5. pmc The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Erica Sodergren
    Science 314:941-52. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Migration load and the coexistence of ecologically similar sexuals and asexuals
    Brian W Spitzer
    Department of Biology, Gustavus Adolphus College, St Peter, Minnesota 56082, USA
    Am Nat 170:567-72. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Evolutionary analysis of the cis-regulatory region of the spicule matrix gene SM50 in strongylocentrotid sea urchins
    Jenna Walters
    Department of Biology, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023, USA
    Dev Biol 315:567-78. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives
    Ralph Haygood
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1879-86. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely...
  2. ncbi request reprint Sexual conflict and protein polymorphism
    Ralph Haygood
    Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Evolution 58:1414-23. 2004
    ..Such fitter-allele dominance might be typical of a ligand or its receptor due to their biochemistry, in which case polymorphism might be typical of the pair...
  3. ncbi request reprint Coexistence in MacArthur-style consumer-resource models
    Ralph Haygood
    Center for Population Biology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Theor Popul Biol 61:215-23. 2002
    ..The significance and limitations of the models and results are discussed...
  4. ncbi request reprint Proceedings of the SMBE Tri-National Young Investigators' Workshop 2005. Mutation rate and the cost of complexity
    Ralph Haygood
    Biology Department, Duke University, NC, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 23:957-63. 2006
    ..The net result is that mutation rate probably does tend to increase with complexity, although probably not fast enough to eliminate the cost of complexity...
  5. pmc The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
    Erica Sodergren
    Science 314:941-52. 2006
    ..This echinoderm genome provides an evolutionary outgroup for the chordates and yields insights into the evolution of deuterostomes...
  6. ncbi request reprint Migration load and the coexistence of ecologically similar sexuals and asexuals
    Brian W Spitzer
    Department of Biology, Gustavus Adolphus College, St Peter, Minnesota 56082, USA
    Am Nat 170:567-72. 2007
    ..This "buffering" effect of migration load is even more relevant in models that include more realistic conditions, such as demographic asymmetries or explicit spatial structure...
  7. doi request reprint Evolutionary analysis of the cis-regulatory region of the spicule matrix gene SM50 in strongylocentrotid sea urchins
    Jenna Walters
    Department of Biology, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023, USA
    Dev Biol 315:567-78. 2008
    ..We speculate that such changes in SM50 and other genes could accumulate to produce altered patterns of gene expression with functional consequences during skeleton formation...