Lee Hagey

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Chemical cues identify gender and individuality in Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
    Lee Hagey
    Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species, Zoological Society of San Diego, Post Office Box 551, San Diego, California 92112 0551, USA
    J Chem Ecol 29:1479-88. 2003
  2. pmc Microbial biotransformations of bile acids as detected by electrospray mass spectrometry
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, USA
    Adv Nutr 4:29-35. 2013
  3. doi request reprint A novel varanic acid epimer--(24R,25S)-3α,7α,12α,24-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid--is a major biliary bile acid in two varanid lizards and the Gila monster
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 063, USA
    Steroids 77:1510-21. 2012
  4. pmc Functional evolution of the vitamin D and pregnane X receptors
    Erica J Reschly
    Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 7:222. 2007
  5. pmc Evolution of pharmacologic specificity in the pregnane X receptor
    Sean Ekins
    Collaborations in Chemistry, Inc, Jenkintown, PA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 8:103. 2008
  6. pmc The evolution of farnesoid X, vitamin D, and pregnane X receptors: insights from the green-spotted pufferfish (Tetraodon nigriviridis) and other non-mammalian species
    Matthew D Krasowski
    Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
    BMC Biochem 12:5. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Comparative urinary androstanes in the great apes
    L R Hagey
    Zoological Society of San Diego, P O Box 120551, San Diego, California 92112, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 130:64-9. 2003
  8. pmc Diversity of bile salts in fish and amphibians: evolution of a complex biochemical pathway
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, MC 0063, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:308-21. 2010
  9. pmc Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 10:133. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint A novel primary bile acid in the Shoebill stork and herons and its phylogenetic significance
    L R Hagey
    Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, CA 92112, USA
    J Lipid Res 43:685-90. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint Chemical cues identify gender and individuality in Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
    Lee Hagey
    Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species, Zoological Society of San Diego, Post Office Box 551, San Diego, California 92112 0551, USA
    J Chem Ecol 29:1479-88. 2003
    ..Since radiocollaring is currently banned in China, the techniques described in this paper give field biologists a new means to identify and track pandas in the wild...
  2. pmc Microbial biotransformations of bile acids as detected by electrospray mass spectrometry
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, USA
    Adv Nutr 4:29-35. 2013
    ..Here we offer a classification scheme that can serve as an initial guide to interpret the different bile acid patterns expressed in vertebrate feces...
  3. doi request reprint A novel varanic acid epimer--(24R,25S)-3α,7α,12α,24-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid--is a major biliary bile acid in two varanid lizards and the Gila monster
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 063, USA
    Steroids 77:1510-21. 2012
    ..The structure was established by mass spectroscopy and by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, as well as by synthesis of the compound...
  4. pmc Functional evolution of the vitamin D and pregnane X receptors
    Erica J Reschly
    Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 7:222. 2007
    ..In addition, several assays were used to search for evidence of PXR-mediated hepatic effects in three model non-mammalian species: sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), zebrafish (Danio rerio), and African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)...
  5. pmc Evolution of pharmacologic specificity in the pregnane X receptor
    Sean Ekins
    Collaborations in Chemistry, Inc, Jenkintown, PA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 8:103. 2008
    ....
  6. pmc The evolution of farnesoid X, vitamin D, and pregnane X receptors: insights from the green-spotted pufferfish (Tetraodon nigriviridis) and other non-mammalian species
    Matthew D Krasowski
    Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
    BMC Biochem 12:5. 2011
    ..We utilize homology modelling, docking, and pharmacophore studies to understand the structural features of the Tetraodon receptors...
  7. ncbi request reprint Comparative urinary androstanes in the great apes
    L R Hagey
    Zoological Society of San Diego, P O Box 120551, San Diego, California 92112, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 130:64-9. 2003
    ..The RIA measurement of urinary testosterone in part records additional androstane metabolites, which vary even between closely related genera, making the results neither equivalent with nor comparable to different species...
  8. pmc Diversity of bile salts in fish and amphibians: evolution of a complex biochemical pathway
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, MC 0063, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:308-21. 2010
    ..Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates...
  9. pmc Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites
    Lee R Hagey
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
    BMC Evol Biol 10:133. 2010
    ..We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt diversity in both reptiles and mammals, including analysis of 8,000 year old human coprolites and coprolites from the extinct Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotherium shastense)...
  10. ncbi request reprint A novel primary bile acid in the Shoebill stork and herons and its phylogenetic significance
    L R Hagey
    Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, CA 92112, USA
    J Lipid Res 43:685-90. 2002
    ..The presence of this biochemical trait in the Shoebill stork and certain herons suggests that these birds are closely related...
  11. ncbi request reprint Physicochemical and physiological properties of 5alpha-cyprinol sulfate, the toxic bile salt of cyprinid fish
    T Goto
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 0813, USA
    J Lipid Res 44:1643-51. 2003
    ..These studies indicate that 5alpha-cyprinol sulfate is an excellent digestive detergent and suggest that a micellar phase is present during digestion in cyprinid fish...
  12. doi request reprint Bile acids: chemistry, pathochemistry, biology, pathobiology, and therapeutics
    A F Hofmann
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 0063, USA
    Cell Mol Life Sci 65:2461-83. 2008
    ..Bile acids are used therapeutically to correct deficiency states, to decrease the cholesterol saturation of bile, or to decrease the cytotoxicity of retained bile acids in cholestatic liver disease...
  13. ncbi request reprint Bile acid absorption after near-total proctocolectomy in dogs: ileal pouch vs. jejunal pouch-distal rectal anastomosis
    F V Teixeira
    Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ 85259
    J Gastrointest Surg 5:540-5. 2001
    ..The resultant passive absorption of unconjugated bile acids appears to compensate for any loss of active ileal absorption of conjugated bile acids, and bile acid malabsorption does not occur...