A G Greenwald

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Measuring individual differences in implicit cognition: the implicit association test
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:1464-80. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Distinguishing unconscious from conscious cognition--reasonable assumptions and replicable findings: reply to Merikle and Reingold (1998) and Dosher (1998)
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 127:320-4. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Health of the Implicit Association Test at age 3
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    Z Exp Psychol 48:85-93. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Modeling unconscious gender bias in fame judgments: finding the proper branch of the correct (multinomial) tree
    S C Draine
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Conscious Cogn 5:221-5. 1996
  5. ncbi request reprint Using the implicit association test to measure self-esteem and self-concept
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 79:1022-38. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Three cognitive markers of unconscious semantic activation
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 273:1699-702. 1996
  7. ncbi request reprint Replicable unconscious semantic priming
    S C Draine
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 127:286-303. 1998
  8. ncbi request reprint On the malleability of automatic attitudes: combating automatic prejudice with images of admired and disliked individuals
    N Dasgupta
    Department of Psychology, New School University, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 81:800-14. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Effect sizes and p values: what should be reported and what should be replicated?
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    Psychophysiology 33:175-83. 1996

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Measuring individual differences in implicit cognition: the implicit association test
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:1464-80. 1998
    ..Korean + pleasant for Japanese vs. Korean subjects), and (c) consciously disavowed evaluative differences (Black + pleasant vs. White + pleasant for self-described unprejudiced White subjects)...
  2. ncbi request reprint Distinguishing unconscious from conscious cognition--reasonable assumptions and replicable findings: reply to Merikle and Reingold (1998) and Dosher (1998)
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 127:320-4. 1998
    ..The second question is answered by pointing out that although Draine and Greenwald (1998) did not claim to have established such dissociation, they provided data that advance the plausibility of that conclusion...
  3. ncbi request reprint Health of the Implicit Association Test at age 3
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    Z Exp Psychol 48:85-93. 2001
    ..It therefore seems appropriate to conclude that the IAT assesses constructs that are often (but not always) distinct from the corresponding constructs measured by self-report...
  4. ncbi request reprint Modeling unconscious gender bias in fame judgments: finding the proper branch of the correct (multinomial) tree
    S C Draine
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA
    Conscious Cogn 5:221-5. 1996
    ..Perhaps a more complex multinomial model can model the Banaji and Greenwald interpretation...
  5. ncbi request reprint Using the implicit association test to measure self-esteem and self-concept
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 79:1022-38. 2000
    ..High implicit self-esteem was associated in the predicted fashion with buffering against adverse effects of failure on two of four measures...
  6. ncbi request reprint Three cognitive markers of unconscious semantic activation
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 273:1699-702. 1996
    ..Thus, unconscious semantic activation is shown to be a readily reproducible phenomenon but also very limited in the duration of its effect...
  7. ncbi request reprint Replicable unconscious semantic priming
    S C Draine
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 127:286-303. 1998
    ..G. Greenwald, M. R. Klinger, and E. S. Schuh (1995). The data of each experiment passed their significant-intercept criterion for demonstrating unconscious cognition...
  8. ncbi request reprint On the malleability of automatic attitudes: combating automatic prejudice with images of admired and disliked individuals
    N Dasgupta
    Department of Psychology, New School University, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 81:800-14. 2001
    ..Experiment 2 provided a replication using automatic age-related attitudes. Together, these studies provide a strategy that attempts to change the social context and, through it, to reduce automatic prejudice and preference...
  9. ncbi request reprint Effect sizes and p values: what should be reported and what should be replicated?
    A G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195 1525, USA
    Psychophysiology 33:175-83. 1996
    ..Together with many recent critics of NHT, we also urge reporting of important hypothesis tests in enough descriptive detail to permit secondary uses such as meta-analysis...