Ronald A Greenfield

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention and treatment of bacterial diseases caused by bacterial bioterrorism threat agents
    Ronald A Greenfield
    The Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and The Oklahoma City Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Drug Discov Today 8:881-8. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Bacterial pathogens as biological weapons and agents of bioterrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:299-315. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Current therapy and the development of therapeutic options for the treatment of diseases due to bacterial agents of potential biowarfare and bioterrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 920 Stanton Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 5:135-40. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Chemical agents as potential weapons of mass destruction
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:309-12. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Anthrax
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section 111 c, Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 95:587-91. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Symposium introduction: clinical aspects of terrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section 111 c, Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 95:583-6. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Unconventional biological threats and the molecular biological response to biological threats
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:350-7. 2002
  8. ncbi request reprint Microbiological, biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:326-40. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial symposium. Part 1. Principles of antimicrobial therapy
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section, PO Box 26901, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 99:474-9. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Part V. Other beta-lactam antimicrobials
    Winter J Gibbs
    Infectious Diseases Section, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:23-5. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention and treatment of bacterial diseases caused by bacterial bioterrorism threat agents
    Ronald A Greenfield
    The Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and The Oklahoma City Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Drug Discov Today 8:881-8. 2003
    ..Safer antitoxins and a vaccine are required to meet the threat of the use of botulinum toxin as a weapon of mass destruction. In this article, the current status of research in these areas is reviewed...
  2. ncbi request reprint Bacterial pathogens as biological weapons and agents of bioterrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:299-315. 2002
    ..Public health programs must be prepared, and individual primary care providers must be able to recognize, diagnose, treat, and prevent infection with these agents...
  3. ncbi request reprint Current therapy and the development of therapeutic options for the treatment of diseases due to bacterial agents of potential biowarfare and bioterrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 920 Stanton Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 5:135-40. 2004
    ..Novel vaccine strategies for plague, tularemia and botulism are also reviewed...
  4. ncbi request reprint Chemical agents as potential weapons of mass destruction
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:309-12. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Anthrax
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section 111 c, Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 95:587-91. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint Symposium introduction: clinical aspects of terrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section 111 c, Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 95:583-6. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Unconventional biological threats and the molecular biological response to biological threats
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:350-7. 2002
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Microbiological, biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:326-40. 2002
    ..Health care providers should be familiar with the medical consequences of toxin exposure, and understand the pathophysiology and management of resulting illness...
  9. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial symposium. Part 1. Principles of antimicrobial therapy
    Ronald A Greenfield
    Infectious Diseases Section, PO Box 26901, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 99:474-9. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint Part V. Other beta-lactam antimicrobials
    Winter J Gibbs
    Infectious Diseases Section, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:23-5. 2007
  11. ncbi request reprint The potential role of viral pathogens as agents of bioterrorism
    Michael S Bronze
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Room WP2080, 920 Stanton Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:29-33. 2003
  12. ncbi request reprint Terrorism symposium update and conclusion
    Michael S Bronze
    Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:575-8. 2003
  13. ncbi request reprint Part III. Penicillins
    Winter J Gibbs
    Infectious Diseases Section, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 99:551-6. 2006
  14. ncbi request reprint Part VII. Macrolides, azalides, ketolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins
    Van Dang
    Infectious Diseases Section, PO Box 26901, WP 1160 Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:75-81. 2007
    ..A lincosamide antibiotic, clindamycin, is primarily used to treat anaerobic infections. A combination of streptogramins, quinupristin/dalfopristin, is used to treat infections due to multiple drug resistant Gram positive cocci...
  15. ncbi request reprint Other bacterial diseases as a potential consequence of bioterrorism: Q fever, brucellosis, glanders, and melioidosis
    Gene W Voskuhl
    Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:214-7. 2003
  16. ncbi request reprint Part XIV. Antiviral agents other than antiretrovirals: therapy for herpesvirus infections, viral hepatitis, and influenza
    Staci M Lockhart
    College of Pharmacy Building, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:388-95. 2007
    ..Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will be discussed in the next symposium segment...
  17. ncbi request reprint Therapeutic options for diseases due to potential viral agents of bioterrorism
    Michael S Bronze
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Williams Pavilion, Room WP2080, 920 Stanton Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 4:172-8. 2003
    ..Genomic analysis of the viral pathogen and the animal model response to infection may provide valuable information enabling the development of novel treatment and prevention strategies. Current knowledge of these strategies is reviewed...
  18. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial symposium. Part IV. Cephalosporins
    Travis W Cooper
    Department of Pharmacy, Clinical and Administrative Sciences, University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy, Oklahoma City, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 99:579-83. 2006
  19. pmc Disseminated fusariosis occurring in two patients despite posaconazole prophylaxis
    Prithviraj Bose
    Section of Hematology Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Clin Microbiol 49:1674-5. 2011
    ..Preclinical and clinical studies indicate activity of posaconazole against Fusarium. We describe two cases of disseminated fusariosis that occurred despite posaconazole prophylaxis...
  20. ncbi request reprint Part XI. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole and tinidazole, rifaximin, and nitazoxanide
    Bhanu Sud
    Infectious Diseases Section, P O Box 26901, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:267-72. 2007
  21. ncbi request reprint Viral agents as biological weapons and agents of bioterrorism
    Michael S Bronze
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City 73190, USA
    Am J Med Sci 323:316-25. 2002
    ..Although the risk of large-scale bioterrorism using viral agents is small, public health programs and health care providers must be prepared for this potentially devastating impact on public health...
  22. ncbi request reprint Part II. Introduction to the beta-lactam antibiotics
    Travis W Cooper
    Infectious Diseases Section, PO Box 26901, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 99:516-20. 2006
  23. ncbi request reprint Infectious disease outbreaks in competitive sports: a review of the literature
    Sean D Turbeville
    Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Am J Sports Med 34:1860-5. 2006
    ..Appropriate surveillance of the frequency of infections will allow sports medicine staff to identify outbreaks quickly and take necessary measures to contain further transmission and prevent future outbreaks...
  24. ncbi request reprint Biological toxins as potential agents of bioterrorism
    Leonard N Slater
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:73-6. 2003
  25. ncbi request reprint Influenza virus: natural disease and bioterrorism threat
    Brock D Lutz
    Infectious Diseases Section 111 c, Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, 405 270 0501, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:27-8. 2003
  26. ncbi request reprint Gatifloxacin-associated hypoglycemia
    Tauseef Ali
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Williams Pavilion, 1140 920 Stanton Young Blvd, OKC, OK 73104, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:425-8. 2007
    ..The hypoglycemia may be profound and difficult to manage. We report 4 patients with hypoglycemia while taking gatifloxacin and review the relevant literature...
  27. doi request reprint Case-control study of statin prevention of mould infections
    Jessica N Thompson
    Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    Mycoses 54:e481-5. 2011
    ..This retrospective case-control study suggests that despite evidence of in vitro activity, statins may not decrease risk of IMI. Prospective, controlled trials may be necessary to investigate any potential clinical benefit...
  28. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial symposium. Part VIII. Glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, and lipopeptides
    Holly L Hoffman-Roberts
    Infectious Diseases Section, PO Box 26901, WP 1160, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:105-11. 2007
  29. ncbi request reprint Preventive and therapeutic approaches to viral agents of bioterrorism
    Michael S Bronze
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Oklahoma Health, Sciences Center and the Oklahoma City, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, USA
    Drug Discov Today 8:740-5. 2003
    ..Continued research is necessary to develop effective strategies to limit the impact of these biological threats...
  30. ncbi request reprint Antimicrobial symposium. Part VI. Aminoglycosides and polymyxins
    Neha Nanda
    Infectious Diseases Section, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:60-4. 2007
  31. ncbi request reprint Cutaneous reactions with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate: a report of nine cases
    Staci M Lockhart
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
    AIDS 21:1370-3. 2007
    ..We therefore examined nine patients with suspected tenofovir hypersensitivity reactions in two indigent care HIV clinics. Type I and type IV hypersensitivity may be involved as immunological mechanisms...
  32. pmc Invasion of the central nervous system by intracellular bacteria
    Douglas A Drevets
    Department of Medicine, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA
    Clin Microbiol Rev 17:323-47. 2004
    ..Recent experimental data showing that L. monocytogenes can invade the CNS by more than one mechanism make it a useful model for discussing the various routes for neuroinvasion used by intracellular bacterial pathogens...
  33. ncbi request reprint Part XIII. Systemic antifungal therapy
    Kristin H Busse
    Infectious Diseases Secton, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:344-51. 2007
    ..So an updated review of antifungal therapy is in order...
  34. ncbi request reprint Blood smear analysis in babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, relapsing fever, malaria, and Chagas disease
    Steve M Blevins
    Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA
    Cleve Clin J Med 75:521-30. 2008
    ....
  35. doi request reprint Tickborne infections in the southern United States
    Linda J Salinas
    Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190, USA
    Am J Med Sci 340:194-201. 2010
    ..Prevention measures, the optimal method for removing an attached tick and current and future vaccine development conclude this review...
  36. ncbi request reprint Levels of L-selectin (CD62L) on human leukocytes in disseminated cryptococcosis with and without associated HIV-1 infection
    Lydgia A Jackson
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
    J Infect Dis 191:1361-7. 2005
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Part IX. Quinolone antimicrobials
    Simi Vincent
    J Okla State Med Assoc 100:149-56. 2007
  38. ncbi request reprint Agroterrorism
    Brock D Lutz
    J Okla State Med Assoc 96:259-63. 2003