C S Green

Summary

Affiliation: University of Rochester
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Enumeration versus multiple object tracking: the case of action video game players
    C S Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, RC 270268, Meliora Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Cognition 101:217-45. 2006
  2. pmc Effect of action video games on the spatial distribution of visuospatial attention
    C Shawn Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 32:1465-78. 2006
  3. pmc Action-video-game experience alters the spatial resolution of vision
    C S Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:88-94. 2007
  4. pmc Video games as a tool to train visual skills
    R L Achtman
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Center for Visual Sciences, University of Rochester, RC 270268, Meliora Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 26:435-46. 2008
  5. pmc The development of attention skills in action video game players
    M W G Dye
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, United States
    Neuropsychologia 47:1780-9. 2009
  6. pmc Children, wired: for better and for worse
    Daphne Bavelier
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Neuron 67:692-701. 2010
  7. pmc Deafness and visual enumeration: not all aspects of attention are modified by deafness
    Peter C Hauser
    Department of Research and Teacher Education, National Technical Institute of the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 5604, USA
    Brain Res 1153:178-87. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Action video game modifies visual selective attention
    C Shawn Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Nature 423:534-7. 2003
  9. doi request reprint Cognitive development: gaming your way out of dyslexia?
    D Bavelier
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Meliora Hall, Box 270268, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Curr Biol 23:R282-3. 2013

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Enumeration versus multiple object tracking: the case of action video game players
    C S Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, RC 270268, Meliora Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Cognition 101:217-45. 2006
    ..Together, these studies confirm the view that playing action video games enhances the number of objects that can be apprehended and suggest that this enhancement is mediated by changes in visual short-term memory skills...
  2. pmc Effect of action video games on the spatial distribution of visuospatial attention
    C Shawn Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 32:1465-78. 2006
    ..By establishing the causal role of gaming through training studies, the authors demonstrate that action gaming enhances visuospatial attention throughout the visual field...
  3. pmc Action-video-game experience alters the spatial resolution of vision
    C S Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:88-94. 2007
    ..Critically, similar effects were observed in non-video-game players who were trained on an action video game; this result verifies a causative relationship between video-game play and augmented spatial resolution...
  4. pmc Video games as a tool to train visual skills
    R L Achtman
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Center for Visual Sciences, University of Rochester, RC 270268, Meliora Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 0268, USA
    Restor Neurol Neurosci 26:435-46. 2008
    ..This paper considers the case of playing action video games as a way to induce widespread enhancement in vision...
  5. pmc The development of attention skills in action video game players
    M W G Dye
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, United States
    Neuropsychologia 47:1780-9. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Children, wired: for better and for worse
    Daphne Bavelier
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Neuron 67:692-701. 2010
    ..Counterintuitive outcomes like these, besides being practically relevant, challenge and eventually lead to refinement of theories concerning fundamental principles of brain plasticity and learning...
  7. pmc Deafness and visual enumeration: not all aspects of attention are modified by deafness
    Peter C Hauser
    Department of Research and Teacher Education, National Technical Institute of the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 5604, USA
    Brain Res 1153:178-87. 2007
    ..Thus, early deafness does not enhance all facets of visual attention, but rather its effects are quite specific...
  8. ncbi request reprint Action video game modifies visual selective attention
    C Shawn Green
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
    Nature 423:534-7. 2003
    ..In a fifth experiment, non-players trained on an action video game show marked improvement from their pre-training abilities, thereby establishing the role of playing in this effect...
  9. doi request reprint Cognitive development: gaming your way out of dyslexia?
    D Bavelier
    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Meliora Hall, Box 270268, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Curr Biol 23:R282-3. 2013
    ..A recent study found that dyslexic children trained on action video games show significant improvements on basic measures of both attention and reading ability, suggesting future directions for the study of dyslexia intervention paradigms...