Ian J Glomski

Summary

Affiliation: University of Virginia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Cellular and physiological effects of anthrax exotoxin and its relevance to disease
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville VA, USA
    Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2:76. 2012
  2. pmc Debridement increases survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous anthrax
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e30201. 2012
  3. pmc Identification of the bacterial protein FtsX as a unique target of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus anthracis
    Matthew A Crawford
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:17159-64. 2011
  4. pmc Bacillus anthracis has two independent bottlenecks that are dependent on the portal of entry in an intranasal model of inhalational infection
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 81:4408-20. 2013
  5. doi Circulating lethal toxin decreases the ability of neutrophils to respond to Bacillus anthracis
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Cell Microbiol 16:504-18. 2014
  6. pmc Updating perspectives on the initiation of Bacillus anthracis growth and dissemination through its host
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 80:1626-33. 2012
  7. pmc Interferon-inducible CXC chemokines directly contribute to host defense against inhalational anthrax in a murine model of infection
    Matthew A Crawford
    Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1001199. 2010
  8. pmc In trans complementation of lethal factor reveal roles in colonization and dissemination in a murine mouse model
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e95950. 2014
  9. pmc Germination and amplification of anthrax spores by soil-dwelling amoebas
    Rafik Dey
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 78:8075-81. 2012
  10. pmc Structural analysis of a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis
    Maria M Klimecka
    Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    J Mol Biol 410:411-23. 2011

Collaborators

  • John R Barr
  • Anne E Boyer
  • Molly A Hughes
  • Borna Mehrad
  • David E Lowe
  • Zachary P Weiner
  • Matthew A Crawford
  • Jason Ya
  • Maribel Gallegos-Candela
  • Rafik Dey
  • Maria M Klimecka
  • Robert M Strieter
  • Stephen M Ernst
  • Christine Zito
  • Stephen M C Ernst
  • Amber N Cardani
  • Paul S Hoffman
  • Lukasz Lebioda
  • John W Beaber
  • Olena Onopryienko
  • Marcin Cymborowski
  • Scott Stibitz
  • Maksymilian Chruszcz
  • Jeremy Hasseman
  • Debra J Fisher
  • Jason Zemansky
  • Jose Font
  • Przemyslaw J Porebski
  • Wladek Minor
  • Alexei Savchenko
  • Matthew D Zimmerman
  • Roger D Plaut
  • Tatiana Skarina
  • Aled Edwards
  • Igor Shumilin
  • Marie D Burdick

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. pmc Cellular and physiological effects of anthrax exotoxin and its relevance to disease
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville VA, USA
    Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2:76. 2012
    ..This review focuses on the progress that has been made bridging molecular knowledge back to the exotoxin's physiological effects on the host...
  2. pmc Debridement increases survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous anthrax
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e30201. 2012
    ..We conclude that the initial entry of spores into the draining lymph node of cutaneous infections alone is not sufficient to cause systemic disease and that debridement should be considered as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy...
  3. pmc Identification of the bacterial protein FtsX as a unique target of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity against Bacillus anthracis
    Matthew A Crawford
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:17159-64. 2011
    ....
  4. pmc Bacillus anthracis has two independent bottlenecks that are dependent on the portal of entry in an intranasal model of inhalational infection
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 81:4408-20. 2013
    ..Collectively, the data suggested that differences in the host environment alter dissemination of B. anthracis depending on the site of initial colonization and growth. ..
  5. doi Circulating lethal toxin decreases the ability of neutrophils to respond to Bacillus anthracis
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Cell Microbiol 16:504-18. 2014
    ..The observations described above suggest that LT serves dual functions; it both attenuates accumulation of PMNs at sites of inflammation and impairs PMNs bactericidal activity against vegetative B.‚ÄČanthracis. ..
  6. pmc Updating perspectives on the initiation of Bacillus anthracis growth and dissemination through its host
    Zachary P Weiner
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 80:1626-33. 2012
    ..anthracis and lymphoid and epithelial tissues...
  7. pmc Interferon-inducible CXC chemokines directly contribute to host defense against inhalational anthrax in a murine model of infection
    Matthew A Crawford
    Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1001199. 2010
    ..anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms...
  8. pmc In trans complementation of lethal factor reveal roles in colonization and dissemination in a murine mouse model
    David E Lowe
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e95950. 2014
    ..These observations suggest that LF has a major role in the early stages of colonization and dissemination. ..
  9. pmc Germination and amplification of anthrax spores by soil-dwelling amoebas
    Rafik Dey
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 78:8075-81. 2012
    ..This analysis supports our hypothesis that amoebas contribute to the persistence and amplification of B. anthracis in natural environments...
  10. pmc Structural analysis of a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis
    Maria M Klimecka
    Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    J Mol Biol 410:411-23. 2011
    ..The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies...