Gregory S Gilbert

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Host and habitat preferences of polypore fungi in Micronesian tropical flooded forests
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Mycol Res 112:674-80. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint The patchiness of epifoliar fungi in tropical forests: host range, host abundance, and environment
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:575-81. 2007
  3. pmc Phylogenetic signal in plant pathogen-host range
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:4979-83. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint When there is no escape: the effects of natural enemies on native, invasive, and noninvasive plants
    Ingrid M Parker
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1156 High Street, EEB EMS, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:1210-24. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Soil calcium and plant disease in serpentine ecosystems: a test of the pathogen refuge hypothesis
    Yuri P Springer
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, A316 Earth and Marine Sciences Building, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Oecologia 151:10-21. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary ecology of plant diseases in natural ecosystems
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Annu Rev Phytopathol 40:13-43. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Phylodiversity-dependent seedling mortality, size structure, and disease in a Bornean rain forest
    Campbell O Webb
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    Ecology 87:S123-31. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Biotic interactions and plant invasions
    Charles E Mitchell
    Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3280, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:726-40. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Population genetic structure of the polypore Datronia caperata in fragmented mangrove forests
    Jeri Lynn Parrent
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Mycol Res 108:403-10. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Direct and interactive effects of enemies and mutualists on plant performance: a meta-analysis
    William F Morris
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecology 88:1021-9. 2007

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. doi request reprint Host and habitat preferences of polypore fungi in Micronesian tropical flooded forests
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Mycol Res 112:674-80. 2008
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The patchiness of epifoliar fungi in tropical forests: host range, host abundance, and environment
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:575-81. 2007
    ..Canopy trees supported only a subset of the fungal symbionts found in the understory, suggesting that adult trees are not reservoirs of these fungal symbionts for understory juveniles...
  3. pmc Phylogenetic signal in plant pathogen-host range
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:4979-83. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint When there is no escape: the effects of natural enemies on native, invasive, and noninvasive plants
    Ingrid M Parker
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1156 High Street, EEB EMS, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecology 88:1210-24. 2007
    ..Therefore, although herbivores preferred native over introduced species, escape from pest pressure cannot be used to explain why some introduced clovers are common invaders in coastal prairie while others are not...
  5. ncbi request reprint Soil calcium and plant disease in serpentine ecosystems: a test of the pathogen refuge hypothesis
    Yuri P Springer
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, A316 Earth and Marine Sciences Building, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Oecologia 151:10-21. 2007
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary ecology of plant diseases in natural ecosystems
    Gregory S Gilbert
    Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA
    Annu Rev Phytopathol 40:13-43. 2002
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Phylodiversity-dependent seedling mortality, size structure, and disease in a Bornean rain forest
    Campbell O Webb
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    Ecology 87:S123-31. 2006
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Biotic interactions and plant invasions
    Charles E Mitchell
    Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3280, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:726-40. 2006
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Population genetic structure of the polypore Datronia caperata in fragmented mangrove forests
    Jeri Lynn Parrent
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Mycol Res 108:403-10. 2004
    ..These results suggest that despite production of copious basidiospores capable of long distance dispersal, some homobasidiomycete fungi may be susceptible to genetic isolation due to habitat fragmentation...
  10. ncbi request reprint Direct and interactive effects of enemies and mutualists on plant performance: a meta-analysis
    William F Morris
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, North Carolina 27708 0338, USA
    Ecology 88:1021-9. 2007
    ..We discuss how observed differences in effect size might be confounded with methodological differences among studies...
  11. doi request reprint Pathogens promote plant diversity through a compensatory response
    Devon J Bradley
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, 80 Waterman Street, Box G W, Providence, RI 02912, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:461-9. 2008
    ..Pathogens may be a major factor in maintaining plant diversity, and our findings emphasize the importance of investigating the roles of pathogens in natural plant communities...