Marc R Freeman

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oregon
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Unwrapping glial biology: Gcm target genes regulating glial development, diversification, and function
    Marc R Freeman
    Institutes of Neuroscience and Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Neuron 38:567-80. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Glial (and neuronal) cells missing
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 719 Lazare Research Building, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Neuron 48:163-5. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Glia got rhythm
    Patrick Emery
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Neuron 55:337-9. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Glial control of synaptogenesis
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Cell 120:292-3. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Glial cell biology in Drosophila and vertebrates
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Trends Neurosci 29:82-90. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Sculpting the nervous system: glial control of neuronal development
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:119-25. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint The Drosophila cell corpse engulfment receptor Draper mediates glial clearance of severed axons
    Jennifer M MacDonald
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Neuron 50:869-81. 2006
  8. pmc Draper-dependent glial phagocytic activity is mediated by Src and Syk family kinase signalling
    Jennifer S Ziegenfuss
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605 2324, USA
    Nature 453:935-9. 2008

Collaborators

  • Chris Q Doe
  • Patrick Emery
  • Jennifer S Ziegenfuss
  • Amy E Sheehan
  • Jennifer M MacDonald
  • E Richard Stanley
  • Yee Guide Yeung
  • Romi Biswas
  • Michelle A Avery
  • Kyoungja Hong
  • Margaret G Beach
  • Ryan J Watts
  • Ermelinda Porpiglia

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Unwrapping glial biology: Gcm target genes regulating glial development, diversification, and function
    Marc R Freeman
    Institutes of Neuroscience and Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
    Neuron 38:567-80. 2003
    ..80% of these Drosophila glial genes have mammalian homologs; these are now excellent candidates for regulating human glial development, function, or disease...
  2. ncbi request reprint Glial (and neuronal) cells missing
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 719 Lazare Research Building, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Neuron 48:163-5. 2005
    ..A study by Chotard et al. in this issue of Neuron reveals that this "master regulator" of glial cell fate specification is also required (gasp!) to generate neurons...
  3. ncbi request reprint Glia got rhythm
    Patrick Emery
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Neuron 55:337-9. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Glial control of synaptogenesis
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Cell 120:292-3. 2005
    ..In this issue of Cell, Barres and colleagues (Christopherson et al., 2005) demonstrate that glial-derived thrombospondins and additional soluble glial-secreted factors regulate synapse assembly and functional maturation...
  5. ncbi request reprint Glial cell biology in Drosophila and vertebrates
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Trends Neurosci 29:82-90. 2006
    ..The striking parallels that emerge from this comparison argue that invertebrate model organisms such as Drosophila have excellent potential to add to our understanding of fundamental aspects of glial biology...
  6. ncbi request reprint Sculpting the nervous system: glial control of neuronal development
    Marc R Freeman
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605 2324, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 16:119-25. 2006
    ..These recent insights provide further compelling evidence that glial cells, through their diverse cellular actions, are essential contributors to the construction of a functionally mature nervous system...
  7. ncbi request reprint The Drosophila cell corpse engulfment receptor Draper mediates glial clearance of severed axons
    Jennifer M MacDonald
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA
    Neuron 50:869-81. 2006
    ..Thus Draper appears to act as a glial receptor for severed axon-derived molecular cues that drive recruitment of glial processes to injured axons for engulfment...
  8. pmc Draper-dependent glial phagocytic activity is mediated by Src and Syk family kinase signalling
    Jennifer S Ziegenfuss
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605 2324, USA
    Nature 453:935-9. 2008
    ..Thus, Draper seems to be an ancient immunoreceptor with an extracellular domain tuned to modified self, and an intracellular domain promoting phagocytosis through an ITAM-domain-SFK-Syk-mediated signalling cascade...