Marilyn C Erickson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Georgia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in chicken manure by larvae of the black soldier fly
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 67:685-90. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Inactivation of protozoan parasites in food, water, and environmental systems
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 69:2786-808. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Surface and internalized Escherichia coli O157:H7 on field-grown spinach and lettuce treated with spray-contaminated irrigation water
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, 1109 Experiment Street, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:1023-9. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Lack of internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) after leaf surface and soil inoculation
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:2028-37. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Preharvest internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into lettuce leaves, as affected by insect and physical damage
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, 1109 Experiment Street, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:1809-16. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of treatments for elimination of foodborne pathogens on the surface of leaves and roots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:228-34. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Fate of manure-borne pathogen surrogates in static composting piles of chicken litter and peanut hulls
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
    Bioresour Technol 101:1014-20. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Infrequent internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into field-grown leafy greens
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:500-6. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Transfer of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to iceberg lettuce via simulated field coring
    Peter J Taormina
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:465-72. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint Heat and drought stress during growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) does not promote internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:2471-5. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. ncbi request reprint Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in chicken manure by larvae of the black soldier fly
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 67:685-90. 2004
    ..Transfer of contaminated larvae to fresh chicken manure restored feeding activity but led to cross-contamination of the fresh manure...
  2. ncbi request reprint Inactivation of protozoan parasites in food, water, and environmental systems
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 69:2786-808. 2006
    ..Careful selection of methods to evaluate inactivation treatments is needed because many studies that have employed vital dye stains and in vitro excystation have produced underestimations of the effectiveness of these treatments...
  3. ncbi request reprint Surface and internalized Escherichia coli O157:H7 on field-grown spinach and lettuce treated with spray-contaminated irrigation water
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, 1109 Experiment Street, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:1023-9. 2010
    ..Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into lettuce leaves also occurred with greater persistence in leaves sprayed on the abaxial side (up to 14 days) than in leaves sprayed on the adaxial side (2 days)...
  4. ncbi request reprint Lack of internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) after leaf surface and soil inoculation
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:2028-37. 2009
    ..coli O157:H7. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 in lettuce leaves and roots did not occur, regardless of the type of lettuce, age of plants, or strain of E. coli O157:H7...
  5. ncbi request reprint Preharvest internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into lettuce leaves, as affected by insect and physical damage
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, 1109 Experiment Street, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:1809-16. 2010
    ..Surface-contaminated leaves physically injured through file abrasions also had significantly reduced populations of both total and internalized E. coli O157:H7 as compared with nonabraded leaves 2 weeks after pathogen exposure...
  6. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of treatments for elimination of foodborne pathogens on the surface of leaves and roots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:228-34. 2009
    ..1% HgCl2 for 10 min was determined to be the most effective surface disinfection method for inactivating E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce leaves and roots and was also validated for inactivating Salmonella and L. monocytogenes...
  7. doi request reprint Fate of manure-borne pathogen surrogates in static composting piles of chicken litter and peanut hulls
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
    Bioresour Technol 101:1014-20. 2010
    ..All three types of bacteria remained detectable by enrichment culture in surface samples composted for 56 days during the winter...
  8. ncbi request reprint Infrequent internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into field-grown leafy greens
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 73:500-6. 2010
    ..These results indicate that internalization of O157 via plant roots in the field is rare and when it does occur, O157 does not persist 7 days later...
  9. ncbi request reprint Transfer of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to iceberg lettuce via simulated field coring
    Peter J Taormina
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:465-72. 2009
    ..Spraying contaminated lettuce with chlorinated or untreated water reduces but does not eliminate E. coli O157:H7...
  10. ncbi request reprint Heat and drought stress during growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) does not promote internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7
    Guodong Zhang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 72:2471-5. 2009
    ..coli O157:H7. Heat stress during growth of lettuce did not promote or enhance internalization of E. coli O157:H7, regardless of the moisture content in the soil...
  11. doi request reprint Physical removal and transfer of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus from contaminated produce by scrubbing and peeling
    Qing Wang
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    J Food Prot 76:85-92. 2013
    ..Findings also provide important information for modeling virus cross-contamination during food preparation...
  12. doi request reprint Inactivation of Salmonella spp. in cow manure composts formulated to different initial C:N ratios
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
    Bioresour Technol 100:5898-903. 2009
    ..Supplementation of compost mixtures with 0.08% ammonium sulfate resulted in slightly higher temperatures; however, these higher temperatures did not translate into more rapid rates of pathogen inactivation...
  13. doi request reprint Opportunities for mitigating pathogen contamination during on-farm food production
    Michael P Doyle
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, 1109 Experiment St, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
    Int J Food Microbiol 152:54-74. 2012
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Food as a vehicle for transmission of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia 30223 1797, USA
    J Food Prot 70:2426-49. 2007
    ..Multiple-hurdle or sequential intervention treatments have the greatest potential to minimize transmission of STEC in foods...
  15. doi request reprint Internalization of fresh produce by foodborne pathogens
    Marilyn C Erickson
    Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia 30223, USA
    Annu Rev Food Sci Technol 3:283-310. 2012
    ..Postharvest internalization of pathogens via cut surfaces may be minimized by maintaining effective levels of sanitizing agents in waters during harvesting and minimal processing...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of storage conditions and pH on chlorine loss in electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water
    Soo Voon Len
    Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223 1797, USA
    J Agric Food Chem 50:209-12. 2002
    ..The chlorine loss of EO water and commercial chlorinated water decreased dramatically with the increase of pH from the acidic (pH 2.5) to the alkaline (pH 9.0) region...
  17. ncbi request reprint Fate of Escherichia coi O157:H7 during on-farm dairy manure-based composting
    Marion W Shepherd
    Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 0316, USA
    J Food Prot 70:2708-16. 2007
    ..coli O157:H7 in cattle wastes on the farm. Our data also suggest when compost heaps are not turned, E. coli O157:H7 may survive for months at the heap surface...