Elissa S Epel

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Cell aging in relation to stress arousal and cardiovascular disease risk factors
    Elissa S Epel
    UCSF Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:277-87. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Depression gets old fast: do stress and depression accelerate cell aging?
    Owen M Wolkowitz
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 27:327-38. 2010
  3. pmc Stress appraisals and cellular aging: a key role for anticipatory threat in the relationship between psychological stress and telomere length
    Aoife O'Donovan
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 26:573-9. 2012
  4. pmc Accelerated telomere shortening in response to life stress
    Elissa S Epel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, 3333 California Street, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:17312-5. 2004
  5. pmc Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress
    Elissa S Epel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 Calif St, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 24:531-9. 2010
  6. ncbi request reprint The rate of leukocyte telomere shortening predicts mortality from cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:81-8. 2008
  7. pmc Association of marine omega-3 fatty acid levels with telomeric aging in patients with coronary heart disease
    Ramin Farzaneh-Far
    Division of Cardiology, Room 5G1, San Francisco General Hospital, 1001 Potrero Ave, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
    JAMA 303:250-7. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Psychological and metabolic stress: a recipe for accelerated cellular aging?
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Hormones (Athens) 8:7-22. 2009
  9. pmc The rate of leukocyte telomere shortening predicts mortality from cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:81-8. 2009
  10. pmc Chronic stress elevates telomerase activity in rats
    Annaliese K Beery
    Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 04143, USA
    Biol Lett 8:1063-6. 2012

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. ncbi request reprint Cell aging in relation to stress arousal and cardiovascular disease risk factors
    Elissa S Epel
    UCSF Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 31:277-87. 2006
    ..These findings may implicate telomerase as a novel and important mediator of the effects of psychological stress on physical health and disease...
  2. doi request reprint Depression gets old fast: do stress and depression accelerate cell aging?
    Owen M Wolkowitz
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA
    Depress Anxiety 27:327-38. 2010
    ....
  3. pmc Stress appraisals and cellular aging: a key role for anticipatory threat in the relationship between psychological stress and telomere length
    Aoife O'Donovan
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 26:573-9. 2012
    ..Exaggerated anticipatory threat appraisals may be a common and modifiable psychological mechanism of psychological stress effects on cellular aging...
  4. pmc Accelerated telomere shortening in response to life stress
    Elissa S Epel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, 3333 California Street, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:17312-5. 2004
    ..These findings have implications for understanding how, at the cellular level, stress may promote earlier onset of age-related diseases...
  5. pmc Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress
    Elissa S Epel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 Calif St, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 24:531-9. 2010
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint The rate of leukocyte telomere shortening predicts mortality from cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:81-8. 2008
    ..0 (95% CI: 1.1 - 8.2). This is the first demonstration that rate of telomere length change (TLC) predicts mortality and thus may be a useful prognostic factor for longevity...
  7. pmc Association of marine omega-3 fatty acid levels with telomeric aging in patients with coronary heart disease
    Ramin Farzaneh-Far
    Division of Cardiology, Room 5G1, San Francisco General Hospital, 1001 Potrero Ave, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
    JAMA 303:250-7. 2010
    ..Increased dietary intake of marine omega-3 fatty acids is associated with prolonged survival in patients with coronary heart disease. However, the mechanisms underlying this protective effect are poorly understood...
  8. ncbi request reprint Psychological and metabolic stress: a recipe for accelerated cellular aging?
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Hormones (Athens) 8:7-22. 2009
    ..Certain psychological temperaments at high risk of this stress cascade (mainly anxiety prone), gene-environment interactions, and potential interventions for interrupting the stress-aging cascade are discussed...
  9. pmc The rate of leukocyte telomere shortening predicts mortality from cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Elissa S Epel
    University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:81-8. 2009
    ..0 (95% CI: 1.1 - 8.2). This is the first demonstration that rate of telomere length change (TLC) predicts mortality and thus may be a useful prognostic factor for longevity...
  10. pmc Chronic stress elevates telomerase activity in rats
    Annaliese K Beery
    Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 04143, USA
    Biol Lett 8:1063-6. 2012
    ..This significant increase suggests a potential mechanism for resilience to stress-related replicative senescence...
  11. pmc Telomere shortening in formerly abused and never abused women
    Janice Humphreys
    Department of Family Health Care Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Biol Res Nurs 14:115-23. 2012
    ..Findings from this descriptive study suggest a link between IPV exposure, duration of IPV-related stress, and telomere length molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular aging...
  12. doi request reprint Positive affect uniquely predicts lower risk of mortality in people with diabetes
    Judith Tedlie Moskowitz
    Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Health Psychol 27:S73-82. 2008
    ..To determine whether positive affect predicts mortality among people with diabetes and among a comparison group of people with no chronic health conditions...
  13. doi request reprint Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat as a mechanism linking anxiety with increased risk for diseases of aging
    Aoife O'Donovan
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 37:96-108. 2013
    ..Chronic inflammation, in turn, increases risk for diseases of aging. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat may thus be a treatment target for reducing disease risk in anxious individuals...
  14. pmc Leptin concentrations in response to acute stress predict subsequent intake of comfort foods
    A Janet Tomiyama
    Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Physiol Behav 107:34-9. 2012
    ..Increasing leptin during the stressor predicted lower intake of comfort food. These initial findings suggest that acute changes in leptin may be one of the factors modulating down the consumption of comfort food following stress...
  15. doi request reprint Glucocorticoids. Mood, memory, and mechanisms
    Owen M Wolkowitz
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1179:19-40. 2009
    ..The article concludes with a conceptual model of glucocorticoid actions in the brain that may lead to novel therapeutic opportunities...
  16. pmc Shorter leukocyte telomere length in midlife women with poor sleep quality
    Aric A Prather
    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program, Center for Health and Community, University of California San Francisco, 3333 California Street, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA
    J Aging Res 2011:721390. 2011
    ..Conclusions. This study provides the first evidence that poor sleep quality explains significant variation in LTL, a marker of cellular aging...
  17. doi request reprint Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with emotional eating
    Lisa S Talbot
    San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94121, USA
    J Trauma Stress 26:521-5. 2013
    ..Findings suggest the importance of future longitudinal research to understand whether emotional eating contributes to the high rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in PTSD. ..
  18. ncbi request reprint Clues to maintaining calorie restriction? Psychosocial profiles of successful long-term restrictors
    Angela C Incollingo Belsky
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Appetite 79:106-12. 2014
    ..Paralleling a movement toward personalized medicine, this study points toward a personalized behavioral medicine model in behavioral nutrition and treatment of overweight/obesity...
  19. pmc The reward-based eating drive scale: a self-report index of reward-based eating
    Elissa S Epel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America UCSF Center for Obesity Assessment, Study, and Treatment, San Francisco, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e101350. 2014
    ..Given the heterogeneity of obesity, unique brief profiling of the reward-based aspect of obesity using a self-report instrument such as the RED scale may be critical for customizing effective treatments in the general population. ..
  20. pmc Black sheep get the blues: a psychobiological model of social rejection and depression
    George M Slavich
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 0848, USA
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 35:39-45. 2010
    ..This response also may be moderated by several factors, including prior life stress, prior depression, and genes implicated in stress reactivity...
  21. doi request reprint Socioeconomic status in relation to early menarche among black and white girls
    Dejana Braithwaite
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Lobby 4 Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 20:713-20. 2009
    ..Early menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. We investigated the variation in age at menarche by socioeconomic status (SES) and race...
  22. ncbi request reprint When blue turns to grey: do stress and depression accelerate cell aging?
    Owen M Wolkowitz
    World J Biol Psychiatry 9:2-5. 2008
  23. ncbi request reprint Flattened cortisol rhythms in metastatic breast cancer patients
    Heather C Abercrombie
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School, 6001 Research Park Blvd, Madison, WI 53719, USA
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 29:1082-92. 2004
    ..These findings suggest that the cortisol diurnal slope may have important but different correlates in healthy women versus those with breast cancer...
  24. pmc Why egalitarianism might be good for your health: physiological thriving during stressful intergroup encounters
    Wendy Berry Mendes
    Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:991-8. 2007
    ..Egalitarianism may have physical and psychological benefits for people living in a diverse society...
  25. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in stress responses: social rejection versus achievement stress
    Laura R Stroud
    Brown University Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 52:318-27. 2002
    ..In particular, we predicted that women would show greater responses to social rejection stressors, whereas men would demonstrate greater responses to achievement stressors...