M Eidson

Summary

Affiliation: University at Albany
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Bat incidents at children's camps, New York State, 1998-2002
    Amy Robbins
    New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:302-5. 2005
  2. pmc Spatial and temporal patterns of enzootic raccoon rabies adjusted for multiple covariates
    Sergio Recuenco
    School of Public Health, University at Albany SUNY, Rensselaer, New York, USA
    Int J Health Geogr 6:14. 2007
  3. pmc Potential cost savings with terrestrial rabies control
    Sergio Recuenco
    Zoonoses Program, Bureau of Communicable Diseases Control, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12237, USA
    BMC Public Health 7:47. 2007
  4. pmc Terrestrial rabies and human postexposure prophylaxis, New York, USA
    Millicent Eidson
    University at Albany School of Public Health, Rensselaer, New York, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 16:527-9. 2010
  5. pmc Assessment of methods for prediction of human West Nile virus (WNV) disease from WNV-infected dead birds
    Anna Veksler
    School of Public Health, University at Albany, One University Place, Rensselaer, New York 12144, USA
    Emerg Themes Epidemiol 6:4. 2009
  6. pmc Dead crow density and West Nile virus monitoring, New York
    Millicent Eidson
    New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1370-5. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint "Neon needles" in a haystack: the advantages of passive surveillance for West Nile virus
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Albany 11237, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 951:38-53. 2001
  8. pmc Dead crow densities and human cases of West Nile virus, New York State, 2000
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:662-4. 2001
  9. pmc Dead bird surveillance as an early warning system for West Nile virus
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:631-5. 2001
  10. pmc Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus in the northeastern United States, 1999
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:615-20. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications16

  1. pmc Bat incidents at children's camps, New York State, 1998-2002
    Amy Robbins
    New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:302-5. 2005
    ..In 53.8% of the incidents, the bat was captured and samples tested negative for rabies virus, which resulted in 61.3% of persons not receiving rabies treatment...
  2. pmc Spatial and temporal patterns of enzootic raccoon rabies adjusted for multiple covariates
    Sergio Recuenco
    School of Public Health, University at Albany SUNY, Rensselaer, New York, USA
    Int J Health Geogr 6:14. 2007
    ..Adjustments were intended to identify the unusual aggregations of cases given the expected distribution based on the observed locations...
  3. pmc Potential cost savings with terrestrial rabies control
    Sergio Recuenco
    Zoonoses Program, Bureau of Communicable Diseases Control, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12237, USA
    BMC Public Health 7:47. 2007
    ..As an initial quantification of the potential cost savings for a control program, the collection of selected rabies cost data was pilot tested for five counties in New York State (NYS) in a three-year period...
  4. pmc Terrestrial rabies and human postexposure prophylaxis, New York, USA
    Millicent Eidson
    University at Albany School of Public Health, Rensselaer, New York, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 16:527-9. 2010
    ..Nonbite exposures and animals of undetermined rabies status accounted for 54% and 56%, respectively, of persons receiving rabies treatments...
  5. pmc Assessment of methods for prediction of human West Nile virus (WNV) disease from WNV-infected dead birds
    Anna Veksler
    School of Public Health, University at Albany, One University Place, Rensselaer, New York 12144, USA
    Emerg Themes Epidemiol 6:4. 2009
    ..Several threshold 'signal' values were assessed and found effective at indicating human case risk, although specific thresholds are likely to vary by region and surveillance system differences...
  6. pmc Dead crow density and West Nile virus monitoring, New York
    Millicent Eidson
    New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1370-5. 2005
    ..Changes in reporting, bird populations, and immunity may require that thresholds other than 0.1 be used in later years or in other areas...
  7. ncbi request reprint "Neon needles" in a haystack: the advantages of passive surveillance for West Nile virus
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Albany 11237, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 951:38-53. 2001
    ....
  8. pmc Dead crow densities and human cases of West Nile virus, New York State, 2000
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:662-4. 2001
    ..Monitoring such densities may be helpful because this factor may be determined without the delays associated with specimen collection and testing...
  9. pmc Dead bird surveillance as an early warning system for West Nile virus
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:631-5. 2001
    ..Dead bird surveillance appears to be valuable for early detection of WN virus and for guiding public education and mosquito control efforts...
  10. pmc Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus in the northeastern United States, 1999
    M Eidson
    Zoonoses Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:615-20. 2001
    ..If established before a WN virus outbreak, a surveillance system based on bird deaths may provide a sensitive method of detecting WN virus...
  11. pmc West Nile virus infection in birds and mosquitoes, New York State, 2000
    K A Bernard
    Arbovirus Laboratories, New York State Department of Health, 5668 State Farm Road, Slingerlands, NY 12159, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:679-85. 2001
    ..Staten Island had the highest MIR (11.42 for Cx. pipiens), which was associated with the highest proportion of dead American Crows that tested positive for WN virus (92%, n=48) and the highest number of human cases (n=10)...
  12. doi request reprint Risk-based cost modelling of oral rabies vaccine interventions for raccoon rabies
    S Recuenco
    School of Public Health, University at Albany SUNY, Rensselaer, NY, USA
    Zoonoses Public Health 56:16-23. 2009
    ..9%. Use of these cost scenarios to determine bait distribution by rabies risk level should be considered to maximize efficacy and reduce costs of ORV interventions...
  13. pmc Mosquito surveillance and polymerase chain reaction detection of West Nile virus, New York State
    D J White
    Arthropod Borne Disease Program, New York State Department of Health, Rm 621 ESP Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, USA
    Emerg Infect Dis 7:643-9. 2001
    ..Collective surveillance activities suggest that WN virus can disperse throughout the state and may impact local health jurisdictions in the state in future years...
  14. ncbi request reprint West Nile virus: a case study in how NY State Health Information infrastructure facilitates preparation and response to disease outbreaks
    I J Gotham
    Bureau of Healthcare Network Systems Management, Information Systems and Health Statistics Group, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA
    J Public Health Manag Pract 7:75-86. 2001
    ..The HIN infrastructure includes partnerships, training/support, technical capacity and architecture similar to NEDSS as proposed by the US CDC...