R G Eckenhoff

Summary

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Differential halothane binding and effects on serum albumin and myoglobin
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Biophys J 75:477-83. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Do specific or nonspecific interactions with proteins underlie inhalational anesthetic action?
    R G Eckenhoff
    Departments of Anesthesia and Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 4283, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 54:610-5. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Cooperative binding of inhaled anesthetics and ATP to firefly luciferase
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia 19104 4283, USA
    Proteins 42:436-41. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Inhaled anesthetic binding sites in human serum albumin
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 4283, USA
    J Biol Chem 275:30439-44. 2000
  5. ncbi request reprint Steric hindrance is not required for n-alkanol cutoff in soluble proteins
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 56:414-8. 1999
  6. ncbi request reprint Anesthetic stabilization of protein intermediates: myoglobin and halothane
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Biochemistry 40:10819-24. 2001
  7. pmc A designed four-alpha-helix bundle that binds the volatile general anesthetic halothane with high affinity
    J S Johansson
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Biophys J 78:982-93. 2000
  8. ncbi request reprint Predictability of weak binding from X-ray crystallography: inhaled anesthetics and myoglobin
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Biochemistry 40:5075-80. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Volatile anesthetics alter protein stability
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Toxicol Lett 100:387-91. 1998
  10. ncbi request reprint Halothane, an inhalational anesthetic agent, increases folding stability of serum albumin
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1430:46-56. 1999

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. pmc Differential halothane binding and effects on serum albumin and myoglobin
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Biophys J 75:477-83. 1998
    ..Preferential binding and stabilization of different conformational states may underlie anesthetic-induced protein dysfunction, as well as provide an explanation for heterogeneity of action...
  2. ncbi request reprint Do specific or nonspecific interactions with proteins underlie inhalational anesthetic action?
    R G Eckenhoff
    Departments of Anesthesia and Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 4283, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 54:610-5. 1998
    ..These observations significantly increase the likelihood that such interactions can be found and optimized...
  3. ncbi request reprint Cooperative binding of inhaled anesthetics and ATP to firefly luciferase
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia 19104 4283, USA
    Proteins 42:436-41. 2001
    ..Our results demonstrate a cooperative binding equilibrium between native ligands and anesthetics, suggesting that similar interactions could underlie actions at biologically relevant targets...
  4. ncbi request reprint Inhaled anesthetic binding sites in human serum albumin
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 4283, USA
    J Biol Chem 275:30439-44. 2000
    ..Finally, myristate isosterically competes with anesthetic binding in the domain III cavity and allosterically enhances anesthetic binding in the interdomain cleft...
  5. ncbi request reprint Steric hindrance is not required for n-alkanol cutoff in soluble proteins
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    Mol Pharmacol 56:414-8. 1999
    ..Finally, these results render cutoff an untenable approach for mapping binding site sterics in the absence of complementary binding measurements, and a poor discriminator of target relevance to general anesthesia...
  6. ncbi request reprint Anesthetic stabilization of protein intermediates: myoglobin and halothane
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    Biochemistry 40:10819-24. 2001
    ..Specific binding to less stable intermediates may underlie anesthetic potentiation of protein activity...
  7. pmc A designed four-alpha-helix bundle that binds the volatile general anesthetic halothane with high affinity
    J S Johansson
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Biophys J 78:982-93. 2000
    ..Finally, preferential stabilization of folded protein conformations may represent a fundamental mechanism of inhaled anesthetic action...
  8. ncbi request reprint Predictability of weak binding from X-ray crystallography: inhaled anesthetics and myoglobin
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Biochemistry 40:5075-80. 2001
    ..These results suggest a need for solution measurements to complement crystallography if the consequences of weak binding to proteins are to be appreciated...
  9. ncbi request reprint Volatile anesthetics alter protein stability
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA
    Toxicol Lett 100:387-91. 1998
    ..4. A shift of Tm in either direction may model the action of inhaled anesthetics on relevant proteins in the central nervous system...
  10. ncbi request reprint Halothane, an inhalational anesthetic agent, increases folding stability of serum albumin
    J W Tanner
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1430:46-56. 1999
    ..Serum albumin is the first protein that has been shown to be stabilized by an inhalational anesthetic...
  11. ncbi request reprint Halothane binding to a G protein coupled receptor in retinal membranes by photoaffinity labeling
    Y Ishizawa
    Departments of Anesthesia, Physiology, and Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia 19104 4283, USA
    Biochemistry 39:8497-502. 2000
    ..The absence of halothane binding to any of the G protein subunits strongly suggests that the functional effects of halothane on GPCR signaling systems are mediated by direct interactions with receptor proteins...
  12. ncbi request reprint Gamma-aminobutyric acid enhancement of halothane binding in rat cerebellum
    M F Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 4283, USA
    Neurosci Lett 286:111-4. 2000
    ..Glutamate, however, did not enhance halothane binding in any layer. These data confirm the presence of coupling, and thus suggest a direct interaction of halothane with a GABA binding protein...
  13. ncbi request reprint Promiscuous ligands and attractive cavities: how do the inhaled anesthetics work?
    R G Eckenhoff
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 4283, USA
    Mol Interv 1:258-68. 2001
    ..Hence, it is essential that we develop an understanding of their molecular pharmacology so that safer alternatives can be developed...