Christine Dunkel-Schetter

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Psychological science on pregnancy: stress processes, biopsychosocial models, and emerging research issues
    Christine Dunkel Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 62:531-58. 2011
  2. doi request reprint Anxiety, depression and stress in pregnancy: implications for mothers, children, research, and practice
    Christine Dunkel Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 1563, USA
    Curr Opin Psychiatry 25:141-8. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Stress and reproduction: introduction to the special section
    C Dunkel-Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095 1563, USA
    Health Psychol 19:507-9. 2000
  4. pmc Paternal support and preterm birth, and the moderation of effects of chronic stress: a study in Los Angeles county mothers
    Jo Kay C Ghosh
    Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Dr South, CHS 71 254, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1772, USA
    Arch Womens Ment Health 13:327-38. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Attitudes toward genetic carrier screening for cystic fibrosis among pregnant women: the role of health beliefs and avoidant coping style
    C Y Fang
    University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology 90095 1563, USA
    Womens Health 3:31-51. 1997
  6. ncbi request reprint Psychological adaptation and birth outcomes: the role of personal resources, stress, and sociocultural context in pregnancy
    C K Rini
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, USA
    Health Psychol 18:333-45. 1999
  7. pmc Racial differences in birth outcomes: the role of general, pregnancy, and racism stress
    Tyan Parker Dominguez
    School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 0411, USA
    Health Psychol 27:194-203. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Prenatal psychosocial factors and the neuroendocrine axis in human pregnancy
    P D Wadhwa
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California, Irvine, USA
    Psychosom Med 58:432-46. 1996
  9. ncbi request reprint When stress happens matters: effects of earthquake timing on stress responsivity in pregnancy
    L M Glynn
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine 92626, USA
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 184:637-42. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. doi request reprint Psychological science on pregnancy: stress processes, biopsychosocial models, and emerging research issues
    Christine Dunkel Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 62:531-58. 2011
    ..Finally, a multilevel theoretical approach for the study of pregnancy anxiety and preterm birth is presented to stimulate future research...
  2. doi request reprint Anxiety, depression and stress in pregnancy: implications for mothers, children, research, and practice
    Christine Dunkel Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 1563, USA
    Curr Opin Psychiatry 25:141-8. 2012
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Stress and reproduction: introduction to the special section
    C Dunkel-Schetter
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095 1563, USA
    Health Psychol 19:507-9. 2000
    ..The implications of this research extend from maternal and infant health to life-span development and adult health and mortality...
  4. pmc Paternal support and preterm birth, and the moderation of effects of chronic stress: a study in Los Angeles county mothers
    Jo Kay C Ghosh
    Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Dr South, CHS 71 254, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1772, USA
    Arch Womens Ment Health 13:327-38. 2010
    ..15 [95%CI 0.92, 5.03]), but women with greater support had no increased risk with moderate-to-high chronic stress (OR 1.13 [95%CI 0.94, 1.35]). Paternal support may moderate the effects of chronic stress on the risk of preterm delivery...
  5. ncbi request reprint Attitudes toward genetic carrier screening for cystic fibrosis among pregnant women: the role of health beliefs and avoidant coping style
    C Y Fang
    University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology 90095 1563, USA
    Womens Health 3:31-51. 1997
    ..Given the advent of genetic screening options for many diseases, in this study we address some issue in women's attitudes toward prenatal screening that are relevant to a variety of genetic screening programs...
  6. ncbi request reprint Psychological adaptation and birth outcomes: the role of personal resources, stress, and sociocultural context in pregnancy
    C K Rini
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, USA
    Health Psychol 18:333-45. 1999
    ..There was no evidence that resources buffered the effects of stress. The importance of personal resources in pregnancy is highlighted along with implications for understanding the etiology of adverse birth outcomes...
  7. pmc Racial differences in birth outcomes: the role of general, pregnancy, and racism stress
    Tyan Parker Dominguez
    School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 0411, USA
    Health Psychol 27:194-203. 2008
    ..This study examined the role of psychosocial stress in racial differences in birth outcomes...
  8. ncbi request reprint Prenatal psychosocial factors and the neuroendocrine axis in human pregnancy
    P D Wadhwa
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California, Irvine, USA
    Psychosom Med 58:432-46. 1996
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint When stress happens matters: effects of earthquake timing on stress responsivity in pregnancy
    L M Glynn
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine 92626, USA
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 184:637-42. 2001
    ..We hypothesized that as pregnancy advanced women would become increasingly resistant to the adverse effects of stress, and so early stress would have more profound effects than later stress...