G E Duncan

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparison of brain metabolic activity patterns induced by ketamine, MK-801 and amphetamine in rats: support for NMDA receptor involvement in responses to subanesthetic dose of ketamine
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, CB 7090, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7090, USA
    Brain Res 843:171-83. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the effects of clozapine, risperidone, and olanzapine on ketamine-induced alterations in regional brain metabolism
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 293:8-14. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of typical and atypical antipsychotic drug action in relation to dopamine and NMDA receptor hypofunction hypotheses of schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry and UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Psychiatry 4:418-28. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint An integrated view of pathophysiological models of schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7250, USA
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 29:250-64. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Differential effects of clozapine and haloperidol on ketamine-induced brain metabolic activation
    G E Duncan
    Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 812:65-75. 1998
  6. ncbi request reprint Metabolic mapping of the rat brain after subanesthetic doses of ketamine: potential relevance to schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 787:181-90. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint Behavioral and neurochemical responses to haloperidol and SCH-23390 in rats treated neonatally or as adults with 6-hydroxydopamine
    G E Duncan
    Biological Sciences Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 243:1027-34. 1987
  8. ncbi request reprint Effects of ketamine, MK-801, and amphetamine on regional brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in freely moving mice
    S Miyamoto
    Department of Psychiatry, Pharmacology and UNC Mental Health and Neuroscience Clinical Research Center, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 22:400-12. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint Blunted brain metabolic response to ketamine in mice lacking D(1A) dopamine receptors
    S Miyamoto
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 894:167-80. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Metabolic and functional mapping of the neural network subserving inferior collicular seizure generalization
    T J McCown
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Brain Res 701:117-28. 1995

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications16

  1. ncbi request reprint Comparison of brain metabolic activity patterns induced by ketamine, MK-801 and amphetamine in rats: support for NMDA receptor involvement in responses to subanesthetic dose of ketamine
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, CB 7090, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7090, USA
    Brain Res 843:171-83. 1999
    ..Thus, the dramatic alteration in regional 2-DG uptake induced by ketamine and MK-801 reflects a state selectively induced by reduced NMDA receptor function...
  2. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the effects of clozapine, risperidone, and olanzapine on ketamine-induced alterations in regional brain metabolism
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 293:8-14. 2000
    ..The results suggest that the ketamine challenge 2-DG paradigm may be a useful model to identify antipsychotic drugs with atypical characteristics and to explore mechanisms of atypical antipsychotic action...
  3. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of typical and atypical antipsychotic drug action in relation to dopamine and NMDA receptor hypofunction hypotheses of schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry and UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Psychiatry 4:418-28. 1999
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint An integrated view of pathophysiological models of schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7250, USA
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 29:250-64. 1999
    ..Although clearly speculative, this conceptual model is consistent with existing evidence and suggests lines of future experimental investigation...
  5. ncbi request reprint Differential effects of clozapine and haloperidol on ketamine-induced brain metabolic activation
    G E Duncan
    Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 812:65-75. 1998
    ..The results also suggest that this model of ketamine-induced alterations in 2-DG uptake may be extremely useful for understanding the complex neural mechanisms of atypical antipsychotic drug action...
  6. ncbi request reprint Metabolic mapping of the rat brain after subanesthetic doses of ketamine: potential relevance to schizophrenia
    G E Duncan
    UNC Neuroscience Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 787:181-90. 1998
    ..The alterations in regional brain metabolism induced by the subanesthetic dose may be relevant to effects of ketamine to induce schizophrenic-like symptoms...
  7. ncbi request reprint Behavioral and neurochemical responses to haloperidol and SCH-23390 in rats treated neonatally or as adults with 6-hydroxydopamine
    G E Duncan
    Biological Sciences Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 243:1027-34. 1987
    ..In contrast, rats lesioned with 6-OHDA as neonates and tested as adults did not exhibit a significant behavioral response to SCH-23390 under our test conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)..
  8. ncbi request reprint Effects of ketamine, MK-801, and amphetamine on regional brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in freely moving mice
    S Miyamoto
    Department of Psychiatry, Pharmacology and UNC Mental Health and Neuroscience Clinical Research Center, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7160, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 22:400-12. 2000
    ..The data also suggest that ketamine-induced changes in 2-DG uptake may provide a useful paradigm for translational research to better understand the pathophysiology of schizophrenia...
  9. ncbi request reprint Blunted brain metabolic response to ketamine in mice lacking D(1A) dopamine receptors
    S Miyamoto
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Brain Res 894:167-80. 2001
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Metabolic and functional mapping of the neural network subserving inferior collicular seizure generalization
    T J McCown
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599, USA
    Brain Res 701:117-28. 1995
    ..Thus, specific forebrain sites form a widespread neural network that mediates the generalization of seizure activity from the inferior collicular cortex into the forebrain...
  11. ncbi request reprint Regional specificity of ethanol and NMDA action in brain revealed with FOS-like immunohistochemistry and differential routes of drug administration
    D J Knapp
    Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, and Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res 25:1662-72. 2001
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Neural adaptation in imipramine-treated rats processed in forced swim test: assessment of time course, handling, rat strain and amine uptake
    I A Paul
    Biological Sciences Research Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 252:997-1005. 1990
    ..abstract truncated at 250 words)..
  13. ncbi request reprint Enhanced ultrasonic vocalization and Fos protein expression following ethanol withdrawal: effects of flumazenil
    S S Moy
    Skipper Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry and UNC Neuroscience Center, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 152:208-15. 2000
    ..This observation has led to the suggestion that anxiety associated with ethanol withdrawal is related to release in brain of an endogenous BZD inverse agonist...
  14. ncbi request reprint A dopamine deficiency model of Lesch-Nyhan disease--the neonatal-6-OHDA-lesioned rat
    G R Breese
    Brain and Development Research Center, University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill 27599
    Brain Res Bull 25:477-84. 1990
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Assessment of NMDA receptor activation in vivo by Fos induction after challenge with the direct NMDA agonist (tetrazol-5-yl)glycine: effects of clozapine and haloperidol
    K Inada
    Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Neural Transm 114:899-908. 2007
    ..Whether or not this action of clozapine contributes to its therapeutic properties will require further study...
  16. ncbi request reprint Treatments for schizophrenia: a critical review of pharmacology and mechanisms of action of antipsychotic drugs
    S Miyamoto
    Department of Neuropsychiatry, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan
    Mol Psychiatry 10:79-104. 2005
    ....