Gina M Donato

Summary

Affiliation: University of Virginia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Delivery of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin to target cells via outer membrane vesicles
    Gina M Donato
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    FEBS Lett 586:459-65. 2012
  2. pmc Role of CD11b/CD18 in the process of intoxication by the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 80:850-9. 2012
  3. pmc Quantification of the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis in vitro and during respiratory infection
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 81:1390-8. 2013
  4. ncbi request reprint Macrophage cytotoxicity produced by adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis: more than just making cyclic AMP!
    Erik L Hewlett
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Box 800419, Charlottesville, 22908, USA
    Mol Microbiol 59:447-59. 2006
  5. pmc Selective translocation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin across the basolateral membranes of polarized epithelial cells
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:10662-70. 2010
  6. pmc Systems analysis of the transcriptional response of human ileocecal epithelial cells to Clostridium difficile toxins and effects on cell cycle control
    Kevin M D'Auria
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA
    BMC Syst Biol 6:2. 2012
  7. pmc Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis
    Gina M Donato
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, 22908, USA
    J Bacteriol 187:7579-88. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Delivery of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin to target cells via outer membrane vesicles
    Gina M Donato
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    FEBS Lett 586:459-65. 2012
    ..Thus OMV-ACT can deliver ACT by processes distinct from those of ACT alone...
  2. pmc Role of CD11b/CD18 in the process of intoxication by the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 80:850-9. 2012
    ..In addition to characterizing the effects of CR3 on the actions of ACT, these data show that ATP consumption is yet another concentration-dependent activity of ACT that must be considered when studying how ACT affects target cells...
  3. pmc Quantification of the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis in vitro and during respiratory infection
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
    Infect Immun 81:1390-8. 2013
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Macrophage cytotoxicity produced by adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis: more than just making cyclic AMP!
    Erik L Hewlett
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Box 800419, Charlottesville, 22908, USA
    Mol Microbiol 59:447-59. 2006
    ....
  5. pmc Selective translocation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin across the basolateral membranes of polarized epithelial cells
    Joshua C Eby
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:10662-70. 2010
    ..Thus, elements of the basolateral membrane render epithelial cells highly sensitive to the entry of ACT in the absence of a specific receptor for toxin binding...
  6. pmc Systems analysis of the transcriptional response of human ileocecal epithelial cells to Clostridium difficile toxins and effects on cell cycle control
    Kevin M D'Auria
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA
    BMC Syst Biol 6:2. 2012
    ..To better understand their effects in a susceptible cell line, we analyzed the transciptome-wide gene expression response of human ileocecal epithelial cells (HCT-8) after 2, 6, and 24 hr of toxin exposure...
  7. pmc Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis
    Gina M Donato
    Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, 22908, USA
    J Bacteriol 187:7579-88. 2005
    ..pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism...