Luda Diatchenko

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Genetic architecture of human pain perception
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, 2190 Old Dental Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Trends Genet 23:605-13. 2007
  2. ncbi Idiopathic pain disorders--pathways of vulnerability
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 7455, USA
    Pain 123:226-30. 2006
  3. pmc Facial pain with localized and widespread manifestations: separate pathways of vulnerability
    Gary D Slade
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Electronic address
    Pain 154:2335-43. 2013
  4. pmc Effect of catechol-O-methyltransferase polymorphism on response to propranolol therapy in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study
    Inna E Tchivileva
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7450, USA
    Pharmacogenet Genomics 20:239-48. 2010
  5. ncbi Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms are associated with multiple pain-evoking stimuli
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Pain 125:216-24. 2006
  6. pmc Relationship between temporomandibular disorders, widespread palpation tenderness, and multiple pain conditions: a case-control study
    Hong Chen
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Pain 13:1016-27. 2012
  7. pmc A novel alternatively spliced isoform of the mu-opioid receptor: functional antagonism
    Pavel Gris
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Pain 6:33. 2010
  8. pmc Signaling pathways mediating beta3-adrenergic receptor-induced production of interleukin-6 in adipocytes
    Inna E Tchivileva
    The Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Immunol 46:2256-66. 2009
  9. pmc Summary of findings from the OPPERA prospective cohort study of incidence of first-onset temporomandibular disorder: implications and future directions
    Gary D Slade
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Electronic address
    J Pain 14:T116-24. 2013
  10. pmc Multivariable modeling of phenotypic risk factors for first-onset TMD: the OPPERA prospective cohort study
    Eric Bair
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Electronic address
    J Pain 14:T102-15. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications39

  1. ncbi Genetic architecture of human pain perception
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, 2190 Old Dental Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Trends Genet 23:605-13. 2007
    ..We propose how both rare deleterious genetic variants and common genetic polymorphisms are mediators of human pain perception and clinical pain phenotypes...
  2. ncbi Idiopathic pain disorders--pathways of vulnerability
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 7455, USA
    Pain 123:226-30. 2006
  3. pmc Facial pain with localized and widespread manifestations: separate pathways of vulnerability
    Gary D Slade
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Electronic address
    Pain 154:2335-43. 2013
    ..9 E-08), although the result was not significant in the replication cohort. These findings illustrate potential for clinical classification of chronic pain based on distinct molecular profiles and genetic background. ..
  4. pmc Effect of catechol-O-methyltransferase polymorphism on response to propranolol therapy in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study
    Inna E Tchivileva
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7450, USA
    Pharmacogenet Genomics 20:239-48. 2010
    ..We hypothesized that the nonselective beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol will reduce clinical and experimental pain in TMD patients in a manner dependent on the individuals' COMT diplotype...
  5. ncbi Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms are associated with multiple pain-evoking stimuli
    Luda Diatchenko
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Pain 125:216-24. 2006
    ..Here, we propose a mechanism whereby these two genetic polymorphisms differentially affect pain perception...
  6. pmc Relationship between temporomandibular disorders, widespread palpation tenderness, and multiple pain conditions: a case-control study
    Hong Chen
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Pain 13:1016-27. 2012
    ..These findings suggest that pain assessment outside of the orofacial region may prove valuable for the classification, diagnosis, and management of TMD patients...
  7. pmc A novel alternatively spliced isoform of the mu-opioid receptor: functional antagonism
    Pavel Gris
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Pain 6:33. 2010
    ..Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain these phenomena, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance and OIH remain poorly understood...
  8. pmc Signaling pathways mediating beta3-adrenergic receptor-induced production of interleukin-6 in adipocytes
    Inna E Tchivileva
    The Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Immunol 46:2256-66. 2009
    ....
  9. pmc Summary of findings from the OPPERA prospective cohort study of incidence of first-onset temporomandibular disorder: implications and future directions
    Gary D Slade
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Electronic address
    J Pain 14:T116-24. 2013
    ....
  10. pmc Multivariable modeling of phenotypic risk factors for first-onset TMD: the OPPERA prospective cohort study
    Eric Bair
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Electronic address
    J Pain 14:T102-15. 2013
    ..Several demographic variables persisted as risk factors even after adjusting for other OPPERA variables, suggesting that environmental variables not measured in OPPERA may also contribute to first-onset TMD...
  11. pmc Study protocol, sample characteristics, and loss to follow-up: the OPPERA prospective cohort study
    Eric Bair
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    J Pain 14:T2-19. 2013
    ..Although "bottom line" statistical conclusions were not affected, multiply-imputed estimates should be considered when evaluating the large number of risk factors under investigation in the OPPERA study...
  12. pmc Signs and symptoms of first-onset TMD and sociodemographic predictors of its development: the OPPERA prospective cohort study
    Gary D Slade
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Electronic address
    J Pain 14:T20-32.e1-3. 2013
    ..Compared to whites, Asians had lower TMD incidence whereas African Americans had greater incidence, although the latter was attenuated somewhat after adjusting for satisfaction with socioeconomic circumstances...
  13. pmc Catechol-O-methyltransferase genotype predicts pain severity in hospitalized burn patients
    Danielle C Orrey
    Department of Anesthesiology and TRYUMPH Research Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7455, USA
    J Burn Care Res 33:518-23. 2012
    ..These findings suggest that genetic factors influencing stress system function may have an important influence on pain severity after burn injury. Further studies of genetic predictors of pain after burn injury are needed...
  14. doi Assessing potential functionality of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphisms associated with pain sensitivity and temporomandibular joint disorders
    Andrea G Nackley
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 617:375-93. 2010
    ..The protocols applied to the study of these molecular genetic mechanisms are detailed herein...
  15. pmc Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone FKBP5 predict persistent musculoskeletal pain after traumatic stress exposure
    Andrey V Bortsov
    TRYUMPH Research Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Pain 154:1419-26. 2013
    ..These results suggest that glucocorticoid pathways influence the development of persistent posttraumatic pain, and that such pathways may be a target of pharmacologic interventions aimed at improving recovery after trauma...
  16. pmc Multisystem dysregulation in painful temporomandibular disorders
    Hong Chen
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA
    J Pain 14:983-96. 2013
    ....
  17. pmc Genetic variants associated with development of TMD and its intermediate phenotypes: the genetic architecture of TMD in the OPPERA prospective cohort study
    Shad B Smith
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    J Pain 14:T91-101.e1-3. 2013
    ..29 × 10(-5)); and heat pain temporal summation with multiple PDZ domain protein (MPDZ, rs10809907, P = 3.05 × 10(-5)). The use of intermediate phenotypes for complex pain diseases revealed new genetic pathways influencing risk of TMD...
  18. pmc Structural basis for μ-opioid receptor binding and activation
    Adrian W R Serohijos
    Biochemistry and Biophysics Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Structure 19:1683-90. 2011
    ..In summary, the MOR1 model provides a tool for elucidating the structural mechanism of ligand-initiated cell signaling and for screening novel analgesics...
  19. pmc Low enzymatic activity haplotypes of the human catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: enrichment for marker SNPs
    Andrea G Nackley
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e5237. 2009
    ..Thus, both minor synonymous and nonsynonymous SNPs in the coding region are markers of functional APS and HPS haplotypes rather than independent contributors to COMT activity...
  20. pmc Three major haplotypes of the beta2 adrenergic receptor define psychological profile, blood pressure, and the risk for development of a common musculoskeletal pain disorder
    Luda Diatchenko
    University of North Carolina, Center for Neurosensory Disorders, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 141:449-62. 2006
    ....
  21. pmc The phenotypic and genetic signatures of common musculoskeletal pain conditions
    Luda Diatchenko
    Regional Center for Neurosensory Disorders, Koury Oral Health Sciences Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7455, USA
    Nat Rev Rheumatol 9:340-50. 2013
    ....
  22. pmc Cytokine biomarkers and chronic pain: association of genes, transcription, and circulating proteins with temporomandibular disorders and widespread palpation tenderness
    Gary D Slade
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7450, USA
    Pain 152:2802-12. 2011
    ..Furthermore, they identify MCP-1, IL-1ra, IL-8, and TGFβ1 as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for pain in patients with TMD...
  23. pmc Potential genetic risk factors for chronic TMD: genetic associations from the OPPERA case control study
    Shad B Smith
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514, USA
    J Pain 12:T92-101. 2011
    ..While these findings need to be replicated in independent cohorts, the genes potentially represent important markers of risk for TMD, and they identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention...
  24. pmc Serotonin-induced hypersensitivity via inhibition of catechol O-methyltransferase activity
    Douglas Tsao
    Department of Chemistry University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Mol Pain 8:25. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that inhibition of COMT via serotonin binding contributes to pain hypersensitivity, providing additional strategies for the treatment of clinical pain conditions...
  25. pmc Large candidate gene association study reveals genetic risk factors and therapeutic targets for fibromyalgia
    Shad B Smith
    Algynomics, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 64:584-93. 2012
    ..Genetic risk factors are known to contribute to the etiology of the syndrome. The aim of this study was to examine >350 genes for association with FM, using a large-scale candidate gene approach...
  26. pmc Disruptive mRNA folding increases translational efficiency of catechol-O-methyltransferase variant
    Douglas Tsao
    Department of Chemistry, Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 39:6201-12. 2011
    ....
  27. pmc Excess risk of temporomandibular disorder associated with cigarette smoking in young adults
    Anne E Sanders
    Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7450, USA
    J Pain 13:21-31. 2012
    ..The main finding was reproduced with secondary analyses of 2 nationally representative surveys of adults conducted in the US and Australia...
  28. pmc Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition increases pain sensitivity through activation of both beta2- and beta3-adrenergic receptors
    Andrea Gail Nackley
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7450, USA
    Pain 128:199-208. 2007
    ....
  29. pmc Catechol O-methyltransferase haplotype predicts immediate musculoskeletal neck pain and psychological symptoms after motor vehicle collision
    Samuel A McLean
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Pain 12:101-7. 2011
    ..038). These findings suggest that genetic variations affecting stress response system function influence the somatic and psychological response to MVC, and provide the first evidence of genetic risk for clinical symptoms after MVC...
  30. ncbi Beta2 adrenergic receptor activation stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages via PKA- and NF-kappaB-independent mechanisms
    Kai Soo Tan
    The Comprehensive Center for Inflammatory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Cell Signal 19:251-60. 2007
    ....
  31. pmc Complex multilocus effects of catechol-o-methyltransferase haplotypes predict pain and pain interference 6 weeks after motor vehicle collision
    Andrey V Bortsov
    TRYUMPH Research Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA
    Neuromolecular Med 16:83-93. 2014
    ..These results suggest that genetic variants in the distal promoter are important contributors to the development of persistent pain after MVC, directly and via the interaction with haplotypes in the coding region of the gene. ..
  32. pmc Study methods, recruitment, sociodemographic findings, and demographic representativeness in the OPPERA study
    Gary D Slade
    Department of Dental Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7450, USA
    J Pain 12:T12-26. 2011
    ..Assessments of representativeness in this demographically diverse group of community volunteers suggest that OPPERA case-control findings have good internal validity...
  33. ncbi Genetic basis for individual variations in pain perception and the development of a chronic pain condition
    Luda Diatchenko
    Comprehensive Center for Inflammatory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    Hum Mol Genet 14:135-43. 2005
    ..Thus, COMT activity substantially influences pain sensitivity, and the three major haplotypes determine COMT activity in humans that inversely correlates with pain sensitivity and the risk of developing TMD...
  34. pmc Potential autonomic risk factors for chronic TMD: descriptive data and empirically identified domains from the OPPERA case-control study
    William Maixner
    Department of Endodontics, Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7455, USA dentistry unc edu
    J Pain 12:T75-91. 2011
    ..Future prospective analyses in the OPPERA cohort will determine if the presence of these autonomic factors predicts increased risk for developing new onset TMD...
  35. pmc Molecular assays for characterization of alternatively spliced isoforms of the u opioid receptor (MOR)
    Pavel Gris
    Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 617:421-35. 2010
    ..In this review, we describe the methodologies used to assay key mediators of MOR activation including cellular assays for cAMP, free Ca(2+), and NO, all of which have been implicated in the pharmacological effects of MOR agonists...
  36. pmc Structural mechanism of S-adenosyl methionine binding to catechol O-methyltransferase
    Douglas Tsao
    Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e24287. 2011
    ..The proposed mechanism enables a general understanding of how divalent metal cations contribute to methyltransferase function...
  37. ncbi GTP cyclohydrolase and tetrahydrobiopterin regulate pain sensitivity and persistence
    Irmgard Tegeder
    Neural Plasticity Research Group, Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Room 4309, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA
    Nat Med 12:1269-77. 2006
    ..BH4 is therefore an intrinsic regulator of pain sensitivity and chronicity, and the GTP cyclohydrolase haplotype is a marker for these traits...
  38. ncbi Perspectives on the genetic basis of opioid-induced hyperalgesia
    Andrea Nackley
    Anesthesiology 104:909-10. 2006
  39. ncbi Generation of full-length cDNA libraries enriched for differentially expressed genes
    Bakhyt Zhumabayeva
    BD Biosciences Clontech, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 221:223-37. 2003