Lisa A Delouise

Summary

Affiliation: University of Rochester
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Microbubble array diffusion assay for the detection of cell secreted factors
    Bryan Bobo
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave Box 697, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Lab Chip 14:3640-50. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Book review: nanotechnology in dermatology
    Lisa A De Louise
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 697, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 8:1047-50. 2013
  3. pmc Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 132:964-75. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Cross-correlation of optical microcavity biosensor response with immobilized enzyme activity. Insights into biosensor sensitivity
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Dermatology and the Center for Future Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 77:3222-30. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Thiol antioxidant-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity
    Hong Zheng
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester NY 14642, USA
    J Biomed Nanotechnol 9:382-92. 2013
  6. pmc The impact of UVB exposure and differentiation state of primary keratinocytes on their interaction with quantum dots
    Luke J Mortensen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    Nanotoxicology 7:1244-54. 2013
  7. pmc Label-free porous silicon immunosensor for broad detection of opiates in a blind clinical study and results comparison to commercial analytical chemistry techniques
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    Anal Chem 82:9711-8. 2010
  8. pmc Effect of homotypic and heterotypic interaction in 3D on the E-selectin mediated adhesive properties of breast cancer cell lines
    Siddarth Chandrasekaran
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Weill Hall, NY 14853, USA
    Biomaterials 33:9037-48. 2012
  9. doi request reprint Enriching and characterizing cancer stem cell sub-populations in the WM115 melanoma cell line
    Siddarth Chandrasekaran
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Goergen Hall, NY 14627, USA
    Biomaterials 32:9316-27. 2011
  10. pmc Tunable detection sensitivity of opiates in urine via a label-free porous silicon competitive inhibition immunosensor
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 697, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 82:714-22. 2010

Research Grants

Collaborators

  • Ziyang Lou
  • Michael R King
  • Hong Zheng
  • Tim R Mosmann
  • Huimin Ouyang
  • Dominik G Rabus
  • Lisa M Bonanno
  • Siddarth Chandrasekaran
  • Ut Binh T Giang
  • Luke J Mortensen
  • Samreen Jatana
  • Meghan C Jones
  • Bryan Bobo
  • James J Kobie
  • Lisa A De Louise
  • Bo Zheng
  • Jonathan Rebhahn
  • Chelsea R Virgile
  • Michael S Piepenbrink
  • Matthew J Kaule
  • Dana Phelan
  • Qihui Pu
  • Alison Elder
  • Anna De Benedetto
  • Robert Gelein
  • Supriya Ravichandran
  • Lisa A Beck
  • Karen L de Mesy Bentley
  • Yue Geng
  • Tai C Kwong
  • Dooyoung Lee

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. pmc Microbubble array diffusion assay for the detection of cell secreted factors
    Bryan Bobo
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave Box 697, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Lab Chip 14:3640-50. 2014
    ..The proof-of-concept assays presented herein lay the groundwork for the progression of MB well arrays as an advanced on-chip cell sorting technology. ..
  2. doi request reprint Book review: nanotechnology in dermatology
    Lisa A De Louise
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 697, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Nanomedicine (Lond) 8:1047-50. 2013
    ..This book is the first of its kind and is a must read for professionals and students interested in the field of nanodermatology. ..
  3. pmc Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 132:964-75. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Cross-correlation of optical microcavity biosensor response with immobilized enzyme activity. Insights into biosensor sensitivity
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Dermatology and the Center for Future Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 77:3222-30. 2005
    ..For chip-based devices, it seems appropriate to report sensitivity in terms of the minimum number of grams of bound target per surface area...
  5. ncbi request reprint Thiol antioxidant-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity
    Hong Zheng
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester NY 14642, USA
    J Biomed Nanotechnol 9:382-92. 2013
    ..The synthetic procedures described are straightforward and can be easily adapted in most laboratory settings...
  6. pmc The impact of UVB exposure and differentiation state of primary keratinocytes on their interaction with quantum dots
    Luke J Mortensen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    Nanotoxicology 7:1244-54. 2013
    ..The implications of these findings for assessing potential risk of human skin exposure are discussed...
  7. pmc Label-free porous silicon immunosensor for broad detection of opiates in a blind clinical study and results comparison to commercial analytical chemistry techniques
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA
    Anal Chem 82:9711-8. 2010
    ..These results motivate future development of label-free PSi technology to reduce complexity and cost of diagnostic testing particularly in a point-of-care setting...
  8. pmc Effect of homotypic and heterotypic interaction in 3D on the E-selectin mediated adhesive properties of breast cancer cell lines
    Siddarth Chandrasekaran
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Weill Hall, NY 14853, USA
    Biomaterials 33:9037-48. 2012
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Enriching and characterizing cancer stem cell sub-populations in the WM115 melanoma cell line
    Siddarth Chandrasekaran
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Goergen Hall, NY 14627, USA
    Biomaterials 32:9316-27. 2011
    ..41e(-40)). These findings taken together add to the existing evidence that melanoma cells propagating as non-adherent/spheroids represent a more aggressive phenotype due to the greater presence of tumor initiating cells...
  10. pmc Tunable detection sensitivity of opiates in urine via a label-free porous silicon competitive inhibition immunosensor
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 697, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 82:714-22. 2010
    ..Furthermore, the versatile surface chemistry developed can be implemented on a range of solid-supported sensors to conduct competitive inhibition assays...
  11. ncbi request reprint Enzyme immobilization in porous silicon: quantitative analysis of the kinetic parameters for glutathione-S-transferases
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Dermatology and the Center for Future Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 77:1950-6. 2005
    ..Finally, the effects of hydration and exposure to denaturants on the immobilized enzyme activity are presented...
  12. ncbi request reprint Label-free quantitative detection of protein using macroporous silicon photonic bandgap biosensors
    Huimin Ouyang
    Center for Future Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 79:1502-6. 2007
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Quantatitive assessment of enzyme immobilization capacity in porous silicon
    Lisa A Delouise
    Department of Dermatology and the Center for Future Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Anal Chem 76:6915-20. 2004
    ..Our findings suggest that porous silicon can be an ideal matrix, where immobilization of a predictable quantity of biological material is desired...
  14. pmc Whole blood optical biosensor
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    Biosens Bioelectron 23:444-8. 2007
    ..We present the first demonstration of highly repeatable, specific detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum and whole blood samples over a typical physiological range using the PSi material as both a biosensor substrate and filter...
  15. pmc Understanding engineered nanomaterial skin interactions and the modulatory effects of ultraviolet radiation skin exposure
    Samreen Jatana
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 6:61-79. 2014
    ..The UVR-induced immunosuppressive response in skin raises intriguing questions that motivate future research directions in the nanotoxicology and nanomedicine fields...
  16. pmc Microenvironment induced spheroid to sheeting transition of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cultured in microbubbles formed in polydimethylsiloxane
    Siddarth Chandrasekaran
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Goergen Hall, NY 14627, USA
    Biomaterials 32:7159-68. 2011
    ..Targeting the tumor microenvironment is an emerging area of anti-cancer therapy...
  17. pmc Steric crowding effects on target detection in an affinity biosensor
    Lisa M Bonanno
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642, USA
    Langmuir 23:5817-23. 2007
    ..4-17 ng mm(-2)), and binding specificity was demonstrated by employing an anti-chicken IgG control receptor. This study underlines the importance of considering binding avidity and surface topography in optimizing chip-based biosensors...
  18. pmc Characterization of cell seeding and specific capture of B cells in microbubble well arrays
    Meghan C Jones
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 15:453-63. 2013
    ..These results emphasize the importance of using primary cells in technology development and suggest the need to utilize B cell capture agents that are insensitive to cell activation...
  19. doi request reprint Quantitative analysis of spherical microbubble cavity array formation in thermally cured polydimethylsiloxane for use in cell sorting applications
    Ut Binh T Giang
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 16:55-67. 2014
    ..Herein, we demonstrate the use of microbubble cavity arrays to dissect the cellular heterogeneity that exists in a tumorigenic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell line at the single cell level...
  20. pmc Quantification of quantum dot murine skin penetration with UVR barrier impairment
    Luke J Mortensen
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rochester, NY, USA
    Nanotoxicology 7:1386-98. 2013
    ..Our results suggest that NP skin penetration and translocation may depend on the specific barrier insult and the inflammatory status of the skin...
  21. ncbi request reprint The cytotoxicity of OPA-modified CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots and its modulation by silibinin in human skin cells
    Hong Zheng
    Dermatology Department, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester NY 14642, USA
    J Biomed Nanotechnol 7:648-58. 2011
    ..These findings suggest that QD cytotoxicity is sensitive to cell types and that pretreatment with antioxidants, such as the natural product silibinin, can modulate QD-induced cytotoxicity...
  22. pmc Microfabrication of cavities in polydimethylsiloxane using DRIE silicon molds
    Ut Binh T Giang
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, RC Box 270168, Goergen Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Lab Chip 7:1660-2. 2007
    ..We present a novel method to create cavities in PDMS that is simple and exhibits wide process latitude allowing control over the radius of curvature to form shallow concave pits or deep spherical cavities...
  23. ncbi request reprint Enhancement of the evanescent field using polymer waveguides fabricated by deep UV exposure on mesoporous silicon
    Dominik G Rabus
    University of California, Santa Cruz, Baskin School of Engineering, CA 95064, USA
    Opt Lett 32:2843-5. 2007
    ..The presented fabrication technique enables the generation of defined regions where the evanescent field is larger than in the rest of the waveguide. This technology can improve the performance of evanescent-wave-based waveguide devices...

Research Grants2

  1. Porous Silicon Optical Sensor for Candida Detection
    Lisa DeLouise; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Essential skills will be acquired that comprise a critical component of the training process to become a successful independent investigator in biomedical sciences. ..