Paul G Davies

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Clearing the air: identity safety moderates the effects of stereotype threat on women's leadership aspirations
    Paul G Davies
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, 4643 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1563, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 88:276-87. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Ambient belonging: how stereotypical cues impact gender participation in computer science
    Sapna Cheryan
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 97:1045-60. 2009
  3. doi request reprint Social identity contingencies: how diversity cues signal threat or safety for African Americans in mainstream institutions
    Valerie Purdie-Vaughns
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:615-30. 2008
  4. doi request reprint The space between us: stereotype threat and distance in interracial contexts
    Phillip Atiba Goff
    Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:91-107. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Seeing black: race, crime, and visual processing
    Jennifer L Eberhardt
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 87:876-93. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Looking deathworthy: perceived stereotypicality of Black defendants predicts capital-sentencing outcomes
    Jennifer L Eberhardt
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:383-6. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint The dynamic time course of stereotype activation: activation, dissipation, and resurrection
    Ziva Kunda
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 82:283-99. 2002

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint Clearing the air: identity safety moderates the effects of stereotype threat on women's leadership aspirations
    Paul G Davies
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, 4643 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1563, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 88:276-87. 2005
    ..Creating an identity-safe environment eliminated vulnerability to stereotype threat despite exposure to threatening situational cues that primed stigmatized social identities and their corresponding stereotypes...
  2. doi request reprint Ambient belonging: how stereotypical cues impact gender participation in computer science
    Sapna Cheryan
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 97:1045-60. 2009
    ..Objects can thus come to broadcast stereotypes of a group, which in turn can deter people who do not identify with these stereotypes from joining that group...
  3. doi request reprint Social identity contingencies: how diversity cues signal threat or safety for African Americans in mainstream institutions
    Valerie Purdie-Vaughns
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:615-30. 2008
    ..The power of social identity contingencies as they relate to underrepresented groups in mainstream institutions is discussed...
  4. doi request reprint The space between us: stereotype threat and distance in interracial contexts
    Phillip Atiba Goff
    Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:91-107. 2008
    ..These results are discussed within a broader discourse of racial distancing and the possibility that certain identity threats may be as important as prejudice in determining the outcomes of interracial interactions...
  5. ncbi request reprint Seeing black: race, crime, and visual processing
    Jennifer L Eberhardt
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 87:876-93. 2004
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Looking deathworthy: perceived stereotypicality of Black defendants predicts capital-sentencing outcomes
    Jennifer L Eberhardt
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:383-6. 2006
    ..Controlling for a wide array of factors, we found that in cases involving a White victim, the more stereotypically Black a defendant is perceived to be, the more likely that person is to be sentenced to death...
  7. ncbi request reprint The dynamic time course of stereotype activation: activation, dissipation, and resurrection
    Ziva Kunda
    Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 82:283-99. 2002
    ..Participants who disagreed with a Black person also applied the Black stereotype to him, but this stereotype application was detected only on an implicit measure of application, not on an explicit measure...