Frank P Cuozzo

Summary

Affiliation: University of North Dakota
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Severe wear and tooth loss in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): a function of feeding ecology, dental structure, and individual life history
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Box 8374, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:490-505. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint A comparison of salivary pH in sympatric wild lemurs (Lemur catta and Propithecus verreauxi) at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Primatol 70:363-71. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Using extant patterns of dental variation to identify species in the primate fossil record: a case study of middle Eocene Omomys from the Bridger Basin, southwestern Wyoming
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Box 8374, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    Primates 49:101-15. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Variation in dental wear and tooth loss among known-aged, older ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): a comparison between wild and captive individuals
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Primatol 72:1026-37. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Interpreting food processing through dietary mechanical properties: a Lemur catta case study
    Nayuta Yamashita
    Department of Anthropology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 1692, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:205-14. 2012
  6. doi request reprint The impact of dental impairment on ring-tailed lemur food processing performance
    James B Millette
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, 233 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:238-48. 2012
  7. doi request reprint What is dental ecology?
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:163-70. 2012
  8. doi request reprint Behavioral responses to tooth loss in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar
    James B Millette
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:120-34. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint Somatic variation in living, wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)
    Michelle L Sauther
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 79:55-78. 2008
  10. doi request reprint Biological variation in a large sample of mouse lemurs from Amboasary, Madagascar: implications for interpreting variation in primate biology and paleobiology
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    J Hum Evol 64:1-20. 2013

Detail Information

Publications16

  1. ncbi request reprint Severe wear and tooth loss in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): a function of feeding ecology, dental structure, and individual life history
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Box 8374, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    J Hum Evol 51:490-505. 2006
    ..The relationship between tooth loss, feeding ecology, dental structure, and individual life history in this population has implications for interpreting behavior based on tooth loss in the hominid fossil record...
  2. ncbi request reprint A comparison of salivary pH in sympatric wild lemurs (Lemur catta and Propithecus verreauxi) at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Primatol 70:363-71. 2008
    ..However, tannins in tamarind fruit may increase friction between teeth, thereby increasing attrition and wear in lemurs. These data also suggest that salivary pH varies between lemur species, corresponding to broad dietary categories...
  3. doi request reprint Using extant patterns of dental variation to identify species in the primate fossil record: a case study of middle Eocene Omomys from the Bridger Basin, southwestern Wyoming
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Box 8374, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    Primates 49:101-15. 2008
    ..carteri) for this new Bridger B Omomys sample from southern Wyoming is affirmed, and this study illustrates the usefulness of dental data from extant primates for evaluating primate fossil samples...
  4. doi request reprint Variation in dental wear and tooth loss among known-aged, older ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): a comparison between wild and captive individuals
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Primatol 72:1026-37. 2010
    ..This pattern becomes apparent before "old age," as seen in individuals as young as 7 years. Among the four "older" female lemurs at BMSR, severe wear and/or tooth loss do not predict offspring survival...
  5. doi request reprint Interpreting food processing through dietary mechanical properties: a Lemur catta case study
    Nayuta Yamashita
    Department of Anthropology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 1692, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:205-14. 2012
    ..We conclude that micro-cracking from repeated loads, in combination with the mechanical and physical properties of the fruit, is primarily responsible for the observed dental damage...
  6. doi request reprint The impact of dental impairment on ring-tailed lemur food processing performance
    James B Millette
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, 233 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:238-48. 2012
    ..0 mm and 11.2 mm sieves. These data suggest individuals with tooth loss consume less fruit than those without loss, potentially reflecting a reduced ability to process tamarind fruit, a key fallback resource at BMSR...
  7. doi request reprint What is dental ecology?
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:163-70. 2012
    ..Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context...
  8. doi request reprint Behavioral responses to tooth loss in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar
    James B Millette
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:120-34. 2009
    ..These data have implications for interpreting behavioral responses to dental impairment in the fossil record...
  9. ncbi request reprint Somatic variation in living, wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)
    Michelle L Sauther
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 79:55-78. 2008
    ..Amassing such data is a critical first step to assess if wild primate populations are exhibiting normal variability or are being affected by potential inbreeding and/or environmental effects...
  10. doi request reprint Biological variation in a large sample of mouse lemurs from Amboasary, Madagascar: implications for interpreting variation in primate biology and paleobiology
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 8374, USA
    J Hum Evol 64:1-20. 2013
    ..Finally, discordance between different biological systems in our mouse lemur samples illustrates the need to examine multiple systems when conducting taxonomic analyses among living or fossil primates...
  11. doi request reprint Primate dental ecology: How teeth respond to the environment
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 148:159-62. 2012
    ....
  12. doi request reprint The impact of fallback foods on wild ring-tailed lemur biology: a comparison of intact and anthropogenically disturbed habitats
    Michelle L Sauther
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:671-86. 2009
    ..Such dental pathologies at Beza Mahafaly, resulting from the use or overemphasis of fallback foods for which they are not biologically adapted, indicate that anthropogenic factors must be considered when examining fallback foods...
  13. ncbi request reprint Tooth loss, survival, and resource use in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): implications for inferring conspecific care in fossil hominids
    Frank P Cuozzo
    Department of Anthropology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA
    J Hum Evol 46:623-31. 2004
  14. ncbi request reprint Intraspecific variation in hair delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) with known individual histories, behavior, and feeding ecology
    James E Loudon
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 0233, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 133:978-85. 2007
    ..Moreover, lemurs that had emigrated between 2003 and 2004 had different delta(13)C and delta(15)N compositions than their original groups...
  15. ncbi request reprint Coprophagy by wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in human-disturbed locations adjacent to the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar
    Krista D Fish
    Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80301, USA
    Am J Primatol 69:713-8. 2007
    ..Coprophagy in this population may be a behavioral adaptation that provides animals access to energy and nutrients and may be an important nutritional source for older, and/or dentally impaired individuals during the dry season...
  16. ncbi request reprint Dental development in Megaladapis edwardsi (Primates, Lemuriformes): implications for understanding life history variation in subfossil lemurs
    Gary T Schwartz
    School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, P O Box 872402, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    J Hum Evol 49:702-21. 2005
    ..We test competing explanations of variation in crown formation timing across the order Primates. Brain size is the best single predictor of crown formation time in primates, but other variables help to explain the variation...