Brian J Cummings

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in spinal cord-injured mice
    Brian J Cummings
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reeve Irvine Research Center, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14069-74. 2005
  2. pmc Analysis of host-mediated repair mechanisms after human CNS-stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: correlation of engraftment with recovery
    Mitra J Hooshmand
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5871. 2009
  3. pmc Adaptation of a ladder beam walking task to assess locomotor recovery in mice following spinal cord injury
    Brian J Cummings
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, United States
    Behav Brain Res 177:232-41. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Human neural stem cell differentiation following transplantation into spinal cord injured mice: association with recovery of locomotor function
    Brian J Cummings
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
    Neurol Res 28:474-81. 2006
  5. pmc Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model
    Desirée L Salazar
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12272. 2010
  6. pmc Safety of epicenter versus intact parenchyma as a transplantation site for human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury therapy
    Katja M Piltti
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, Uiversity of California, Irvine, CA, USA
    Stem Cells Transl Med 2:204-16. 2013
  7. pmc Achieving stable human stem cell engraftment and survival in the CNS: is the future of regenerative medicine immunodeficient?
    Aileen J Anderson
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Center, 845 Health Science Road, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 1705, USA
    Regen Med 6:367-406. 2011
  8. pmc Comparison of immunopathology and locomotor recovery in C57BL/6, BUB/BnJ, and NOD-SCID mice after contusion spinal cord injury
    Sabina Luchetti
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 4540, USA
    J Neurotrauma 27:411-21. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Alzheimer's disease--a sum greater than its parts?
    Paul A Adlard
    Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California, 1113 Gillespie N R F, Irvine, CA 92697 4540, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 25:725-33; discussion 743-6. 2004
  10. doi request reprint Functional assessment of long-term deficits in rodent models of traumatic brain injury
    Eric M Gold
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine 2030 Gross Hall, CA 92697 1705, USA
    Regen Med 8:483-516. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. pmc Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in spinal cord-injured mice
    Brian J Cummings
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reeve Irvine Research Center, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14069-74. 2005
    ..Glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytic differentiation was rare, and hCNS-SCns did not appear to contribute to the scar. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns may possess therapeutic potential for CNS injury and disease...
  2. pmc Analysis of host-mediated repair mechanisms after human CNS-stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: correlation of engraftment with recovery
    Mitra J Hooshmand
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5871. 2009
    ..However, the hypothesis that hCNS-SCns could alter the host microenvironment as an additional or alternative mechanism of recovery remained unexplored; we tested that hypothesis in the present study...
  3. pmc Adaptation of a ladder beam walking task to assess locomotor recovery in mice following spinal cord injury
    Brian J Cummings
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, United States
    Behav Brain Res 177:232-41. 2007
    ..Critically, horizontal ladder beam testing discriminates between mice that score identically in terms of stepping frequency in open-field testing...
  4. ncbi request reprint Human neural stem cell differentiation following transplantation into spinal cord injured mice: association with recovery of locomotor function
    Brian J Cummings
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
    Neurol Res 28:474-81. 2006
    ....
  5. pmc Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model
    Desirée L Salazar
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12272. 2010
    ..We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery...
  6. pmc Safety of epicenter versus intact parenchyma as a transplantation site for human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury therapy
    Katja M Piltti
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, Uiversity of California, Irvine, CA, USA
    Stem Cells Transl Med 2:204-16. 2013
    ..Taken together, these data suggest that the intact parenchyma may be a more favorable transplantation site than the injury epicenter in the subacute period post-SCI...
  7. pmc Achieving stable human stem cell engraftment and survival in the CNS: is the future of regenerative medicine immunodeficient?
    Aileen J Anderson
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Center, 845 Health Science Road, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 1705, USA
    Regen Med 6:367-406. 2011
    ..Finally, we discuss strategies in the selection of animal models to maximize the predictive validity of preclinical safety and efficacy studies...
  8. pmc Comparison of immunopathology and locomotor recovery in C57BL/6, BUB/BnJ, and NOD-SCID mice after contusion spinal cord injury
    Sabina Luchetti
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 4540, USA
    J Neurotrauma 27:411-21. 2010
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Alzheimer's disease--a sum greater than its parts?
    Paul A Adlard
    Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California, 1113 Gillespie N R F, Irvine, CA 92697 4540, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 25:725-33; discussion 743-6. 2004
  10. doi request reprint Functional assessment of long-term deficits in rodent models of traumatic brain injury
    Eric M Gold
    Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine 2030 Gross Hall, CA 92697 1705, USA
    Regen Med 8:483-516. 2013
    ..Furthermore, regulatory bodies will likely require at least 6 months survival post-transplantation for assessment of toxicology/safety, particularly in the context of assessing cell abnormalities. ..
  11. ncbi request reprint Induction of early neural precursors and derivation of tripotent neural stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells under xeno-free conditions
    Hal X Nguyen
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Irvine, California Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, California Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine, California Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California, Irvine, California
    J Comp Neurol 522:2767-83. 2014
    ..J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2767-2783, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. ..
  12. ncbi request reprint Optimization of techniques for the maximal detection and quantification of Alzheimer's-related neuropathology with digital imaging
    Brian J Cummings
    Institute for Brain Aging, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 4540, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 23:161-70. 2002
    ..0). Because the latter treatments were often harsh on the tissue and more difficult to control, we recommend a standard tissue pretreatment of 99% formic acid for seven minutes for both beta-amyloid and tau-related pathology...
  13. ncbi request reprint The induction of the TNFalpha death domain signaling pathway in Alzheimer's disease brain
    Ming Zhao
    Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, USA
    Neurochem Res 28:307-18. 2003
    ..Our findings suggest that the TNF death receptor pathway and caspases are activated in the early stages of neuronal degeneration in AD...