Donald A Croll

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The diving behavior of blue and fin whales: is dive duration shorter than expected based on oxygen stores?
    D A Croll
    Institute of Marine Sciences, A316 Earth and Marine Sciences Bldg, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:797-809. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Only male fin whales sing loud songs
    Donald A Croll
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95060, USA
    Nature 417:809. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Introduced predators transform subarctic islands from grassland to tundra
    D A Croll
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Island Conservation, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Science 307:1959-61. 2005
  4. pmc Introduced rats indirectly change marine rocky intertidal communities from algae- to invertebrate-dominated
    Carolyn M Kurle
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:3800-4. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Contaminant-associated alteration of immune function in black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), a North Pacific predator
    Myra E Finkelstein
    Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1896-903. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
  7. ncbi request reprint High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales
    A Acevedo-Gutiérrez
    Institute of Marine Sciences, Center for Ocean Health, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1747-53. 2002
  8. ncbi request reprint Immune function of cryopreserved avian peripheral white blood cells: potential biomarkers of contaminant effects in wild birds
    M Finkelstein
    Department of Ocean Sciences, 1156 High St, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 44:502-9. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of sex, tissue type, and dietary components on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N) in mammalian omnivores
    Carolyn M Kurle
    a Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
    Isotopes Environ Health Stud 50:307-21. 2014
  10. pmc The making of a productivity hotspot in the coastal ocean
    Dana K Wingfield
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e27874. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint The diving behavior of blue and fin whales: is dive duration shorter than expected based on oxygen stores?
    D A Croll
    Institute of Marine Sciences, A316 Earth and Marine Sciences Bldg, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 129:797-809. 2001
    ..We propose instead that short duration diving in large whales results from either: (1) dispersal behavior of prey; or (2) a high energetic cost of foraging...
  2. ncbi request reprint Only male fin whales sing loud songs
    Donald A Croll
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95060, USA
    Nature 417:809. 2002
    ..This finding indicates that they may function as male breeding displays, and will help to focus concern on the impact of human-generated low-frequency sounds on recovering whale populations...
  3. ncbi request reprint Introduced predators transform subarctic islands from grassland to tundra
    D A Croll
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Island Conservation, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Science 307:1959-61. 2005
    ..By preying on seabirds, foxes reduced nutrient transport from ocean to land, affecting soil fertility and transforming grasslands to dwarf shrub/forb-dominated ecosystems...
  4. pmc Introduced rats indirectly change marine rocky intertidal communities from algae- to invertebrate-dominated
    Carolyn M Kurle
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:3800-4. 2008
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Contaminant-associated alteration of immune function in black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), a North Pacific predator
    Myra E Finkelstein
    Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Environ Toxicol Chem 26:1896-903. 2007
    ..Our results raise concern regarding detrimental health effects in pelagic predators exposed to persistent marine pollutants...
  6. ncbi request reprint Sink or swim: strategies for cost-efficient diving by marine mammals
    T M Williams
    Department of Biology, EMS A316, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Science 288:133-6. 2000
    ..2 to 59.6% reduction in diving energetic costs. This energy-conserving strategy allows marine mammals to increase aerobic dive duration and achieve remarkable depths despite limited oxygen availability when submerged...
  7. ncbi request reprint High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales
    A Acevedo-Gutiérrez
    Institute of Marine Sciences, Center for Ocean Health, 100 Shaffer Road, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1747-53. 2002
    ..As a corollary, because of their limited foraging time under water, these whales may be particularly vulnerable to perturbations in prey abundance...
  8. ncbi request reprint Immune function of cryopreserved avian peripheral white blood cells: potential biomarkers of contaminant effects in wild birds
    M Finkelstein
    Department of Ocean Sciences, 1156 High St, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 44:502-9. 2003
    ..This study will facilitate greater use of ex vivo immune function assays as tools to study effects of contaminant exposure in wildlife by demonstrating the viability and functionality of cryopreserved avian cells...
  9. ncbi request reprint The effects of sex, tissue type, and dietary components on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N) in mammalian omnivores
    Carolyn M Kurle
    a Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA
    Isotopes Environ Health Stud 50:307-21. 2014
    ....
  10. pmc The making of a productivity hotspot in the coastal ocean
    Dana K Wingfield
    Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e27874. 2011
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Vocal activity as a low cost and scalable index of seabird colony size
    Abraham L Borker
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, U S A
    Conserv Biol 28:1100-8. 2014
    ..La Actividad Vocal como un Índice Escalable y de Bajo Costo del Tamaño de Colonia de las Aves Marinas. ..
  12. ncbi request reprint Albatross species demonstrate regional differences in North Pacific marine contamination
    Myra Finkelstein
    Environmental Toxicology, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:678-86. 2006
    ..Our results demonstrate dramatically high and increasing contaminant concentrations in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, a finding relevant to other marine predators, including humans...
  13. doi request reprint Severity of the effects of invasive rats on seabirds: a global review
    Holly P Jones
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 370 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511 2104, USA
    Conserv Biol 22:16-26. 2008
    ....