R V Croce

Summary

Affiliation: University of New Hampshire
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Augmented feedback for enhanced skill acquisition in individuals with traumatic brain injury
    R Croce
    Department of Kinesiology, New Hampshire Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham 03824 3559, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 82:507-14. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint Effect of ankle position fixation on peak torque and electromyographic activity of the knee flexors and extensors
    R V Croce
    University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 40:365-73. 2000
  3. ncbi request reprint Reliability and concurrent validity of the movement assessment battery for children
    R V Croce
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham 03824, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 93:275-80. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Coactivation patterns of the medial and lateral hamstrings based on joint position and movement velocity during isokinetic movements
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 46:113-22. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Angle- and velocity-specific alterations in torque and semg activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings during isokinetic extension-flexion movements
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 46:83-100. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of movement velocity and movement pattern on the reciprocal co-activation of the hamstrings
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 43:451-8. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Reciprocal coactivation patterns of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings during slow, medium and high speed isokinetic movements
    J P Miller
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol 10:233-9. 2000
  8. ncbi request reprint Knee muscular response strategies differ by developmental level but not gender during jump landing
    R V Croce
    University of New Hampshire s Applied Biomechanics and Motor Control Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 44:339-48. 2004

Collaborators

  • J P Miller
  • R Hutchins

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Augmented feedback for enhanced skill acquisition in individuals with traumatic brain injury
    R Croce
    Department of Kinesiology, New Hampshire Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham 03824 3559, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 82:507-14. 1996
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Effect of ankle position fixation on peak torque and electromyographic activity of the knee flexors and extensors
    R V Croce
    University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 40:365-73. 2000
    ..The reason for decreased knee flexor PT with the ankle fixed in plantarflexion is probably due to the gastrocnemius muscle being in a too shortened position, thereby preventing it from effectively producing force at the knee joint...
  3. ncbi request reprint Reliability and concurrent validity of the movement assessment battery for children
    R V Croce
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham 03824, USA
    Percept Mot Skills 93:275-80. 2001
    ..These results support the use of the Movement battery as a measure of motor ability in children, ages 5 to 12 years...
  4. ncbi request reprint Coactivation patterns of the medial and lateral hamstrings based on joint position and movement velocity during isokinetic movements
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 46:113-22. 2006
    ..It would appear that the way in which the body performs this function is not only to increase the amplitude of BF muscle firing but also to shift toward the recruitment of more fast-twitch motor units...
  5. ncbi request reprint Angle- and velocity-specific alterations in torque and semg activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings during isokinetic extension-flexion movements
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 46:83-100. 2006
    ..Data support the hypothesis of lower activation levels of the quadriceps muscle in the extended position espoused by several authors as a way to protect the knee-joint in the knee-extended position...
  6. ncbi request reprint The effect of movement velocity and movement pattern on the reciprocal co-activation of the hamstrings
    R V Croce
    Motor Control and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 43:451-8. 2003
    ..Results also indicate that movement pattern (reciprocal vs. non reciprocal) does not effect appreciably SEMG activity of hamstrings' co-contraction...
  7. ncbi request reprint Reciprocal coactivation patterns of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings during slow, medium and high speed isokinetic movements
    J P Miller
    Department of Kinesiology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol 10:233-9. 2000
    ..In addition, these results suggest that motor unit recruitment patterns of the VM and VL and the MH and BF differ with regard to the effects of velocity and fatigue...
  8. ncbi request reprint Knee muscular response strategies differ by developmental level but not gender during jump landing
    R V Croce
    University of New Hampshire s Applied Biomechanics and Motor Control Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Durham, NH 03824, USA
    Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 44:339-48. 2004
    ..On the other hand, pre-pubescent subjects controlled these forces by having a greater level of hamstrings' co-activation during landing, which represents more of a reflexive activation in response to ground impact...