L M Coussens

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc MMP-9 supplied by bone marrow-derived cells contributes to skin carcinogenesis
    L M Coussens
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143, USA
    Cell 103:481-90. 2000
  2. pmc Inflammation and cancer
    Lisa M Coussens
    Cancer Research Institute, Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Nature 420:860-7. 2002
  3. ncbi Paradoxical roles of the immune system during cancer development
    Karin E de Visser
    Department of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Nat Rev Cancer 6:24-37. 2006
  4. pmc Optical imaging of the peri-tumoral inflammatory response in breast cancer
    Akhilesh K Sista
    Department of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Transl Med 7:94. 2009
  5. pmc Inflammation and breast cancer. Balancing immune response: crosstalk between adaptive and innate immune cells during breast cancer progression
    David G DeNardo
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Breast Cancer Res 9:212. 2007
  6. pmc Inflammatory mast cells up-regulate angiogenesis during squamous epithelial carcinogenesis
    L M Coussens
    Hormone Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, California 94143 0534, USA
    Genes Dev 13:1382-97. 1999
  7. ncbi Distinctive features of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis determine their functionality during de novo tumor development
    Alexandra Eichten
    Department of Pathology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94115, USA
    Cancer Res 67:5211-20. 2007
  8. ncbi Epithelial carcinogenesis: dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and their microenvironment
    Leon C L Van Kempen
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Differentiation 70:610-23. 2002
  9. ncbi The interplay between innate and adaptive immunity regulates cancer development
    K E de Visser
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter St, N 261, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cancer Immunol Immunother 54:1143-52. 2005
  10. pmc The Bcl-2 repertoire of mesothelioma spheroids underlies acquired apoptotic multicellular resistance
    D Barbone
    Lung Biology Center, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
    Cell Death Dis 2:e174. 2011

Detail Information

Publications48

  1. pmc MMP-9 supplied by bone marrow-derived cells contributes to skin carcinogenesis
    L M Coussens
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143, USA
    Cell 103:481-90. 2000
    ..Thus, inflammatory cells can be coconspirators in carcinogenesis...
  2. pmc Inflammation and cancer
    Lisa M Coussens
    Cancer Research Institute, Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Nature 420:860-7. 2002
    ..These insights are fostering new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer development...
  3. ncbi Paradoxical roles of the immune system during cancer development
    Karin E de Visser
    Department of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Nat Rev Cancer 6:24-37. 2006
    ....
  4. pmc Optical imaging of the peri-tumoral inflammatory response in breast cancer
    Akhilesh K Sista
    Department of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Transl Med 7:94. 2009
    ..The purpose of this study was to determine whether injected fluorescently-labeled monocytes accumulate within murine breast tumors and are visible with optical imaging...
  5. pmc Inflammation and breast cancer. Balancing immune response: crosstalk between adaptive and innate immune cells during breast cancer progression
    David G DeNardo
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Breast Cancer Res 9:212. 2007
    ..Herein we review this body of literature and summarize important new findings revealing the paradoxical role of innate and adaptive leukocytes as regulators of breast carcinogenesis...
  6. pmc Inflammatory mast cells up-regulate angiogenesis during squamous epithelial carcinogenesis
    L M Coussens
    Hormone Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, California 94143 0534, USA
    Genes Dev 13:1382-97. 1999
    ....
  7. ncbi Distinctive features of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis determine their functionality during de novo tumor development
    Alexandra Eichten
    Department of Pathology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94115, USA
    Cancer Res 67:5211-20. 2007
    ..Strategies to normalize intratumoral hemodynamics would therefore enhance therapeutic delivery to otherwise poorly accessible central regions of solid tumors...
  8. ncbi Epithelial carcinogenesis: dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and their microenvironment
    Leon C L Van Kempen
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Differentiation 70:610-23. 2002
    ....
  9. ncbi The interplay between innate and adaptive immunity regulates cancer development
    K E de Visser
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter St, N 261, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cancer Immunol Immunother 54:1143-52. 2005
    ....
  10. pmc The Bcl-2 repertoire of mesothelioma spheroids underlies acquired apoptotic multicellular resistance
    D Barbone
    Lung Biology Center, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
    Cell Death Dis 2:e174. 2011
    ..Therefore, mesothelioma, a highly resistant tumor, may have an intrinsic sensitivity to Bcl-2 blockade that can be exploited therapeutically...
  11. ncbi Tumor stroma and regulation of cancer development
    Thea D Tlsty
    Department of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California 94115, USA
    Annu Rev Pathol 1:119-50. 2006
    ....
  12. ncbi TIMP-1 alters susceptibility to carcinogenesis
    Jin Sae Rhee
    Medical Scientist Training Program, Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
    Cancer Res 64:952-61. 2004
    ..The combined implications of these studies suggest that TIMP-1 is an important contributor to epithelial neoplastic progression and supports the concept that TIMP-1 exerts differential regulation on tissues in a stage-dependent manner...
  13. pmc Stromal regulation of vessel stability by MMP14 and TGFbeta
    Nor E Sounni
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Dis Model Mech 3:317-32. 2010
    ..Antagonists of this pathway could be therapeutically exploited to improve the delivery of therapeutics or molecular contrast agents into tissues where chronic damage or neoplastic disease limits their efficient delivery...
  14. ncbi Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 expression increases in Mycoplasma-infected airways but is not required for microvascular remodeling
    Peter Baluk
    Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 0130, USA
    Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 287:L307-17. 2004
    ..We conclude that despite major increases in expression, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are not essential for microvascular remodeling in M. pulmonis-induced chronic airway inflammation...
  15. ncbi Extrinsic regulators of epithelial tumor progression: metalloproteinases
    G Bergers
    Hormone Research Institute, University of California, 1090 HSW Box 0534, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 10:120-7. 2000
    ....
  16. pmc Polarized immune responses differentially regulate cancer development
    Magnus Johansson
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Immunol Rev 222:145-54. 2008
    ..Herein, we review clinical and experimental studies investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms utilized by neoplastic tissues to alternatively polarize immune responses that favor either pro- or anti-tumor immunity...
  17. ncbi De novo carcinogenesis promoted by chronic inflammation is B lymphocyte dependent
    Karin E de Visser
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    Cancer Cell 7:411-23. 2005
    ..g., chronic inflammation, angiogenic vasculature, hyperproliferative epidermis. These findings support a model in which B lymphocytes are required for establishing chronic inflammatory states that promote de novo carcinogenesis...
  18. ncbi Soluble mediators of inflammation during tumor development
    Stephen C Robinson
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 94143, USA
    Adv Cancer Res 93:159-87. 2005
    ..This chapter focuses on the clinical and experimental data implicating proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines as important potentiators of carcinogenesis...
  19. ncbi Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors and cancer: trials and tribulations
    Lisa M Coussens
    Department of Pathology and Cancer Research Institute, University of California, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Science 295:2387-92. 2002
    ..The important lessons learned from the MPI experience may be of great value for future studies of MPIs and for cancer drug development in general...
  20. ncbi IKKalpha at the crossroads of inflammation and metastasis
    Nesrine I Affara
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cell 129:25-6. 2007
    ..This leads to repression of maspin, a critical suppressor of metastasis, and thus commits malignant prostatic epithelial cells to a metastatic fate...
  21. doi Three-dimensional visualization of blood and lymphatic vasculature in tissue whole mounts using confocal microscopy
    Alexandra Eichten
    University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Curr Protoc Cytom . 2005
    ..Together, these approaches allow functional and morphological analysis of blood vasculature distinct from endothelial cells within the lymphatic vascular network and surrounding support cells...
  22. pmc FcRgamma activation regulates inflammation-associated squamous carcinogenesis
    Pauline Andreu
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, 94143, USA
    Cancer Cell 17:121-34. 2010
    ..These findings support a model in which B cells, humoral immunity, and activating FcgammaRs are required for establishing chronic inflammatory programs that promote de novo carcinogenesis...
  23. ncbi Analysis of immune cell infiltrates during squamous carcinoma development
    Simon R Junankar
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA
    J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc 11:36-43. 2006
    ..Herein, we provide detailed methodology facilitating these analyses...
  24. ncbi Immune cells as mediators of solid tumor metastasis
    David G DeNardo
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
    Cancer Metastasis Rev 27:11-8. 2008
    ..This review focuses on recent literature revealing new mechanisms whereby immune cells regulate metastatic progression, with a primary focus on breast cancer...
  25. pmc Early neoplastic progression is complement independent
    Karin E de Visser
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Neoplasia 6:768-76. 2004
    ..keratinocyte hyperproliferation or angiogenesis. Taken together, these data suggest that complement-independent pathways are critical for leukocyte recruitment into neoplastic tissue and leukocyte-mediated potentiation of tumorigenesis...
  26. pmc EMX2 is epigenetically silenced and suppresses growth in human lung cancer
    J Okamoto
    Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Oncogene 29:5969-75. 2010
    ..Taken together, our study suggests that EMX2 may have important roles as a novel suppressor in human lung cancer...
  27. doi Inflaming gastrointestinal oncogenic programming
    David G DeNardo
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cancer Cell 14:7-9. 2008
    ....
  28. doi Delineating protease functions during cancer development
    Nesrine I Affara
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 539:1-32. 2009
    ....
  29. ncbi MMP9 potentiates pulmonary metastasis formation
    Leon C L Van Kempen
    Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cancer Cell 2:251-2. 2002
    ....
  30. ncbi RECKing MMP function: implications for cancer development
    Jin Sae Rhee
    Medical Scientist Training Program and Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter St, 94143, USA
    Trends Cell Biol 12:209-11. 2002
    ..Homozygous loss of RECK results in embryonic lethality and attenuated tumor development in adults - thus providing further support for an efficacious role for protease inhibitors as anticancer therapeutics...
  31. pmc Immune enhancement of skin carcinogenesis by CD4+ T cells
    Dylan Daniel
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Diabetes and Comprehensive Cancer Centers, University of California at San Francisco, 94143, USA
    J Exp Med 197:1017-28. 2003
    ..The data reveal an unexpected capability of CD4 T cells, whereby, proinflammatory CD4+ T cells, apparently responding to bacterial infection of dysplastic skin lesions, can inadvertently enhance neoplastic progression to invasive cancer...
  32. ncbi Humoral immunity, inflammation and cancer
    Ting Ting Tan
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco 2340 Sutter St, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Curr Opin Immunol 19:209-16. 2007
    ....
  33. pmc Cancer and inflammation: promise for biologic therapy
    Sandra Demaria
    Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
    J Immunother 33:335-51. 2010
    ....
  34. pmc Type I collagen is a genetic modifier of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in murine skeletal development
    Mikala Egeblad
    Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 0452, USA
    Dev Dyn 236:1683-93. 2007
    ..Developmental Dynamics 236:1683-1693, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc...
  35. ncbi Immune cells as anti-cancer therapeutic targets and tools
    Magnus Johansson
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    J Cell Biochem 101:918-26. 2007
    ....
  36. pmc Interactions between lymphocytes and myeloid cells regulate pro- versus anti-tumor immunity
    David G DeNardo
    Department of Pathology, University of California, 513 Parnassus Ave, HSW 450C, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Cancer Metastasis Rev 29:309-16. 2010
    ..Here, we detail the diversity of heterogeneous B and T lymphocyte populations and their impacts on solid tumor development through their abilities to regulate myeloid cell function in solid tumors...
  37. pmc Lymphocytes in cancer development: polarization towards pro-tumor immunity
    Brian Ruffell
    Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, United States
    Cytokine Growth Factor Rev 21:3-10. 2010
    ..This includes, in addition to the role of T regulatory cells, a role for natural killer T cells and CD4(+) T helper cells in suppressing anti-tumor immunity and promoting cancer growth and metastasis...
  38. ncbi The contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the tumor vasculature in neuroblastoma is matrix metalloproteinase-9 dependent
    Sonata Jodele
    Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Southern California and The Saban Research Institute of Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
    Cancer Res 65:3200-8. 2005
    ..Taken together, the data show that in neuroblastoma, MMP-9 plays a critical role in the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to the tumor microenvironment where they positively contribute to angiogenesis and tumor progression...
  39. pmc The initial steps of ovarian cancer cell metastasis are mediated by MMP-2 cleavage of vitronectin and fibronectin
    Hilary A Kenny
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
    J Clin Invest 118:1367-79. 2008
    ..These findings indicate that MMP-2 expressed by metastatic OvCa cells functionally regulates their attachment to peritoneal surfaces...
  40. ncbi The tumor microenvironment: a critical determinant of neoplastic evolution
    Leon C L T van Kempen
    University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Eur J Cell Biol 82:539-48. 2003
    ....
  41. ncbi Stromal matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulates the vascular architecture in neuroblastoma by promoting pericyte recruitment
    Christophe F Chantrain
    Department of Pediatrics and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Cancer Res 64:1675-86. 2004
    ..Taken together, the data demonstrate that in neuroblastoma, stromally derived MMP-9 contributes to angiogenesis by promoting blood vessel morphogenesis and pericyte recruitment...
  42. ncbi Hu/Mu ProtIn oligonucleotide microarray: dual-species array for profiling protease and protease inhibitor gene expression in tumors and their microenvironment
    Donald R Schwartz
    Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Mol Cancer Res 5:443-54. 2007
    ....
  43. ncbi Inflammation, proteases and cancer
    Leon C L Van Kempen
    Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 24, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Eur J Cancer 42:728-34. 2006
    ..This review highlights recent insights into the role of chronic inflammation associated with cancer development and examines proteolytic pathways activated by infiltrating leukocytes during neoplastic programming of tissues...
  44. ncbi Tumor progression and metastasis from genetic to microenvironmental determinants: a workshop of the tumor progression and metastasis NIH study section in honor of Dr. Martin L. Padarathsingh, May 31, 2006, Georgetown, Washington, DC
    YVES A DE CLERCK
    University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90027, USA
    Cancer Biol Ther 5:1588-99. 2006
  45. ncbi The inflammatory tumor microenvironment and its impact on cancer development
    Karin E de Visser
    Department of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Contrib Microbiol 13:118-37. 2006
    ..The following chapter focuses on the inflammatory components and processes engaged during cancer development and the impact of the inflammatory microenvironment...
  46. ncbi Cancer: an inflammatory link
    Fran Balkwill
    Nature 431:405-6. 2004
  47. ncbi Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 promotes liver metastasis by induction of hepatocyte growth factor signaling
    Charlotte Kopitz
    Institut für Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, Universitat Munchen, Munich, Germany
    Cancer Res 67:8615-23. 2007
    ..Similar TIMP-1-associated changes in gene expression were detected in livers of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The newly identified role of TIMP-1 to create a prometastatic niche may also explain the TIMP-1 paradoxon...
  48. doi Genetic and cellular mechanisms of oncogenesis
    Lisa M Coussens
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 18:1-2. 2008