Kevin Conley

Summary

Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi Elevated energy coupling and aerobic capacity improves exercise performance in endurance-trained elderly subjects
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 98:899-907. 2013
  2. doi Exercise efficiency is reduced by mitochondrial uncoupling in the elderly
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 98:768-77. 2013
  3. ncbi Mitochondrial dysfunction and age
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 10:688-92. 2007
  4. ncbi Mitochondrial dysfunction: impact on exercise performance and cellular aging
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 35:43-9. 2007
  5. ncbi Mitochondrial function, fibre types and ageing: new insights from human muscle in vivo
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 92:333-9. 2007
  6. pmc Glycolysis is independent of oxygenation state in stimulated human skeletal muscle in vivo
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Physiol 511:935-45. 1998
  7. ncbi Energy-saving mechanisms in muscle: the minimization strategy
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:2175-81. 2002
  8. pmc Oxidative capacity and ageing in human muscle
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Physiol 526:203-10. 2000
  9. ncbi Limits to sustainable muscle performance: interaction between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3189-94. 2001
  10. pmc Shaking up glycolysis: Sustained, high lactate flux during aerobic rattling
    W F Kemper
    Departments of Radiology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Bioengineering, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195-7115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:723-8. 2001

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. doi Elevated energy coupling and aerobic capacity improves exercise performance in endurance-trained elderly subjects
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 98:899-907. 2013
    ..These results suggest that leg exercise performance benefits from elevations in energy coupling and oxidative phosphorylation capacity at both the whole-body and muscle levels that accompany endurance training in the elderly...
  2. doi Exercise efficiency is reduced by mitochondrial uncoupling in the elderly
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 98:768-77. 2013
    ..Thus, two independent methods revealed that reduced mitochondrial-coupling efficiency was a key part of the drop in exercise efficiency in these elderly subjects and may be an important part of the loss of exercise performance with age...
  3. ncbi Mitochondrial dysfunction and age
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 10:688-92. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi Mitochondrial dysfunction: impact on exercise performance and cellular aging
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 35:43-9. 2007
    ..Exercise training can reverse age-related dysfunction, thereby providing an intervention to slow the pace of aging and disability in the elderly...
  5. ncbi Mitochondrial function, fibre types and ageing: new insights from human muscle in vivo
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Exp Physiol 92:333-9. 2007
    ....
  6. pmc Glycolysis is independent of oxygenation state in stimulated human skeletal muscle in vivo
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Physiol 511:935-45. 1998
    ..These results show a key role for muscle stimulation in the activation and maintenance of glycolysis. Further, this glycolytic control mechanism is independent of the feedback control mechanism that governs oxidative phosphorylation...
  7. ncbi Energy-saving mechanisms in muscle: the minimization strategy
    Kevin E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:2175-81. 2002
    ..Thus, specializations that permit rapid contractions at a low rate of ATP use per twitch are the basis of a minimization strategy for energy saving in muscles contracting at high frequency...
  8. pmc Oxidative capacity and ageing in human muscle
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Physiol 526:203-10. 2000
    ..The cellular basis of this drop was a reduction in mitochondrial content, as well as a lower oxidative capacity of the mitochondria with age...
  9. ncbi Limits to sustainable muscle performance: interaction between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    J Exp Biol 204:3189-94. 2001
    ..Thus, both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation play important roles in setting the highest steady-state ATP synthesis flux and thereby determine the sustainable level of work by exercising muscle...
  10. pmc Shaking up glycolysis: Sustained, high lactate flux during aerobic rattling
    W F Kemper
    Departments of Radiology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Bioengineering, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195-7115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:723-8. 2001
    ..Instead, they demonstrate that glycolysis can provide a high and sustainable supply of ATP along with oxidative phosphorylation without muscle fatigue...
  11. ncbi Energetics of muscle contraction: the whole is less than the sum of its parts
    M J Kushmerick
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, U S A
    Biochem Soc Trans 30:227-31. 2002
    ..Thus there is a small set of rules for assessing and understanding the thermodynamics and kinetics of muscle energetics...
  12. ncbi Large energetic adaptations of elderly muscle to resistance and endurance training
    S A Jubrias
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Appl Physiol 90:1663-70. 2001
    ..Thus elderly muscle remains adaptable to chronic exercise, with large energetic changes accompanying both ET and RT...
  13. pmc Ageing, muscle properties and maximal O(2) uptake rate in humans
    K E Conley
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 7115
    J Physiol 526:211-7. 2000
    ....
  14. pmc Reduced mitochondrial coupling in vivo alters cellular energetics in aged mouse skeletal muscle
    David J Marcinek
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Physiol 569:467-73. 2005
    ..These results demonstrate reduced mitochondrial coupling in aged skeletal muscle that alters cellular metabolism and energetics...
  15. pmc Mild mitochondrial uncoupling impacts cellular aging in human muscles in vivo
    Catherine E Amara
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:1057-62. 2007
    ..Instead, they support mild uncoupling as a mechanism protecting mitochondrial function and contributing to the paradoxical longevity of the most active muscle fibers...
  16. ncbi Control of glycolysis in contracting skeletal muscle. II. Turning it off
    Gregory J Crowther
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 7115, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 282:E74-9. 2002
    ..We conclude that the inactivation of glycolysis after exercise reflects the cessation of contractile activity and is mediated within the glycolytic pathway rather than via the control of glycogen breakdown...
  17. ncbi Wavelength shift analysis: a simple method to determine the contribution of hemoglobin and myoglobin to in vivo optical spectra
    David J Marcinek
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Appl Spectrosc 61:665-9. 2007
    ..This advance will facilitate comparison of the metabolic properties between individual muscles and provides a fully noninvasive approach to measuring local respiration that can be adapted for clinical use...
  18. pmc Mechanical stimuli regulate rapamycin-sensitive signalling by a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-, protein kinase B- and growth factor-independent mechanism
    Troy A Hornberger
    School of Kinesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, 901 W Roosevelt, Chicago, IL 60608, USA
    Biochem J 380:795-804. 2004
    ..Thus mechanical stimuli and growth factors provide distinct inputs through which mTOR co-ordinates an increase in the translational efficiency...
  19. ncbi Mitochondrial coupling in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle
    David J Marcinek
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 286:C457-63. 2004
    ....
  20. pmc Acidosis inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in contracting human skeletal muscle in vivo
    Sharon A Jubrias
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Physiol 553:589-99. 2003
    ..These results show that acidosis inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in vivo and can limit ATP supply in exercising muscle to below the mitochondrial capacity...
  21. ncbi Oxygen regulation and limitation to cellular respiration in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo
    David J Marcinek
    Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Avenue, Seattle, WA 98195 7115, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 285:H1900-8. 2003
    ..Therefore, we reject a regulatory role for oxygen in cellular respiration and conclude that oxygen acts as a simple substrate for respiration under physiological conditions...
  22. ncbi Altered energetic properties in skeletal muscle of men with well-controlled insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes
    Gregory J Crowther
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle 98195, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 284:E655-62. 2003
    ....
  23. ncbi A "functional biopsy" of muscle properties in sprinters and distance runners
    Gregory J Crowther
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, 98195 7115, USA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 34:1719-24. 2002
    ..We asked whether comparable flux differences are evident in the muscles of athletes specializing in extremely different (i.e., sprint and long-distance) running events...
  24. ncbi Basal glycogenolysis in mouse skeletal muscle: in vitro model predicts in vivo fluxes
    Melissa J Lambeth
    University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle 98195 7115, USA
    Mol Biol Rep 29:135-9. 2002
    ..This result demonstrates that additional features of in vivo enzyme binding are not necessary for quantitative description of glycogenolytic dynamics...
  25. ncbi Control of glycolysis in contracting skeletal muscle. I. Turning it on
    Gregory J Crowther
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 7115, USA
    Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 282:E67-73. 2002
    ..We conclude that the delayed onset of glycolytic flux during exercise reflects the time needed to raise metabolites to flux-activating levels...
  26. ncbi Mechanical trade-offs explain how performance increases without increasing cost in rattlesnake tailshaker muscle
    Brad R Moon
    Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:667-75. 2002
    ..These mechanical trade-offs between twitch tension and duration and between joint force and displacement explain how force, work and power increase without an increase in metabolic cost...
  27. ncbi Minimal shortening in a high-frequency muscle
    Brad R Moon
    Department of Biology, PO Box 42451, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504 2451, USA
    J Exp Biol 206:1291-7. 2003
    ..2-0.5 ms and 0.002-0.035%), indicating little potential for elastic energy storage and recoil. These features indicate that high-frequency muscles primarily reduce metabolic energy input rather than recycle mechanical energy output...

Research Grants8

  1. MR & Optical Diagnosis of Mitochondrial Metabolism and Dysfunction
    Kevin E Conley; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Upon completion of this project we will be in position to translate our tools to standard wide bore 3T or other human magnets for use in a clinical setting. ..
  2. RESPIRATION AND GLYCOLYSIS--INTEGRATION IN ACTIVE MUSCLE
    Kevin Conley; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..g., diabetes. An understanding of the integration of metabolism in healthy tissue is the first step to understanding how failure of integration limits function in diseased muscle. ..