Elsa E Cleland

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Responses of grassland production to single and multiple global environmental changes
    Jeffrey S Dukes
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 3:e319. 2005
  2. pmc Diverse responses of phenology to global changes in a grassland ecosystem
    Elsa E Cleland
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:13740-4. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Gastropod herbivory in response to elevated CO2 and N addition impacts plant community composition
    Elsa E Cleland
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 87:686-94. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Shifting plant phenology in response to global change
    Elsa E Cleland
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:357-65. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of elevated CO2, N deposition and climate change on plant litter quality in a California annual grassland
    Hugh A L Henry
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 142:465-73. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Grassland responses to global environmental changes suppressed by elevated CO2
    M Rebecca Shaw
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 298:1987-90. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Global analysis of nitrogen and phosphorus limitation of primary producers in freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems
    James J Elser
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:1135-42. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Environmental and plant community determinants of species loss following nitrogen enrichment
    Chris M Clark
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:596-607. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Herbivore control of annual grassland composition in current and future environments
    Halton A Peters
    Ecol Lett 9:86-94. 2006
  10. pmc Functional- and abundance-based mechanisms explain diversity loss due to N fertilization
    Katharine N Suding
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 2525, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4387-92. 2005

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Responses of grassland production to single and multiple global environmental changes
    Jeffrey S Dukes
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 3:e319. 2005
    ..Aside from this nitrate response, expectations that a changing atmosphere and climate would promote carbon storage by increasing plant growth appear unlikely to be realized in this system...
  2. pmc Diverse responses of phenology to global changes in a grassland ecosystem
    Elsa E Cleland
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:13740-4. 2006
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Gastropod herbivory in response to elevated CO2 and N addition impacts plant community composition
    Elsa E Cleland
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 87:686-94. 2006
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Shifting plant phenology in response to global change
    Elsa E Cleland
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:357-65. 2007
    ..Here, we discuss recent advances in several fields that have enabled scaling between species responses to recent climatic changes and shifts in ecosystem productivity, with implications for global carbon cycling...
  5. ncbi request reprint Interactive effects of elevated CO2, N deposition and climate change on plant litter quality in a California annual grassland
    Hugh A L Henry
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 142:465-73. 2005
    ..However, with the exception of variation in N, litter quality had little influence on decomposition over the short term...
  6. ncbi request reprint Grassland responses to global environmental changes suppressed by elevated CO2
    M Rebecca Shaw
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 298:1987-90. 2002
    ..These findings indicate the importance of a multifactor experimental approach to understanding ecosystem responses to global change...
  7. ncbi request reprint Global analysis of nitrogen and phosphorus limitation of primary producers in freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems
    James J Elser
    School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:1135-42. 2007
    ..Thus, contrary to some prevailing paradigms, freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems are surprisingly similar in terms of N and P limitation...
  8. ncbi request reprint Environmental and plant community determinants of species loss following nitrogen enrichment
    Chris M Clark
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:596-607. 2007
    ..Our results indicate sensitivity to N addition is co-determined by environmental conditions and production responsiveness, which overwhelm the effects of initial community structure and composition...
  9. ncbi request reprint Herbivore control of annual grassland composition in current and future environments
    Halton A Peters
    Ecol Lett 9:86-94. 2006
    ..For four of the five global change scenarios, gastropod impacts explained > 50% of the quantitative changes, indicating that herbivore preferences can be a major driver of plant community responses to global changes...
  10. pmc Functional- and abundance-based mechanisms explain diversity loss due to N fertilization
    Katharine N Suding
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 2525, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4387-92. 2005
    ..As N availability continues to increase globally, management that focuses on locally susceptible functional groups and generally susceptible rare species will be essential to maintain biodiversity...
  11. pmc Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California
    Katharine Hayhoe
    ATMOS Research and Consulting, 809 West Colfax Avenue, South Bend, IN 46601, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:12422-7. 2004
    ..Although interscenario differences in climate impacts and costs of adaptation emerge mainly in the second half of the century, they are strongly dependent on emissions from preceding decades...
  12. pmc Consumer versus resource control of producer diversity depends on ecosystem type and producer community structure
    Helmut Hillebrand
    Institute for Botany, University of Cologne, Gyrhofstrasse 15, D 50931 Cologne, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:10904-9. 2007
    ..Our study indicates that system productivity and producer evenness determine the direction and magnitude of top-down and bottom-up control of diversity and may reconcile divergent empirical results within and among ecosystems...
  13. doi request reprint A cross-system synthesis of consumer and nutrient resource control on producer biomass
    Daniel S Gruner
    Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
    Ecol Lett 11:740-55. 2008
    ..g. vertebrates and invertebrates) and multiple trophic levels; and - in addition to measuring producer biomass - assess the responses of species diversity, community composition and nutrient status...
  14. ncbi request reprint Scale-dependent responses of plant biodiversity to nitrogen enrichment
    David R Chalcraft
    Department of Biology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858, USA
    Ecology 89:2165-71. 2008
    ....