N S Clayton

Summary

Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Memory and the hippocampus in food-storing birds: a comparative approach
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California Davis, 95616, USA
    Neuropharmacology 37:441-52. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Episodic-like memory during cache recovery by scrub jays
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California at Davis, 95616, USA
    Nature 395:272-4. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Memory for the content of caches by scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens)
    N S Clayton
    Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 25:82-91. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) remember the relative time of caching as well as the location and content of their caches
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616 8519, USA
    J Comp Psychol 113:403-16. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Hippocampal growth and maintenance depend on food-caching experience in juvenile mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, USA
    Behav Neurosci 115:614-25. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Changes in spatial memory mediated by experimental variation in food supply do not affect hippocampal anatomy in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Neurobiol 51:142-8. 2002
  7. pmc Effects of demanding foraging conditions on cache retrival accuracy in food-caching mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616 8519, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 268:363-8. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) form integrated memories of the multiple features of caching episodes
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 27:17-29. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Testing episodic memory in animals: a new approach
    D P Griffiths
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California-Davis, Briggs Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Physiol Behav 73:755-62. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Long-term unpredictable foraging conditions and physiological stress response in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616-8519, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 123:324-31. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint Memory and the hippocampus in food-storing birds: a comparative approach
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California Davis, 95616, USA
    Neuropharmacology 37:441-52. 1998
    ..Memory for food caches triggers a dramatic increase in the total number of number of neurons within the avian hippocampus by altering the rate at which these cells are born and die...
  2. ncbi request reprint Episodic-like memory during cache recovery by scrub jays
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California at Davis, 95616, USA
    Nature 395:272-4. 1998
    ..The recovery preference of jays demonstrates memory of where and when particular food items were cached, thereby fulfilling the behavioural criteria for episodic-like memory in non-human animals...
  3. ncbi request reprint Memory for the content of caches by scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens)
    N S Clayton
    Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 25:82-91. 1999
    ..Thus jays remember the specific foods they cache and recover by a mnemonic process that cannot be explained in terms of simple associations between the foods and their cache locations...
  4. ncbi request reprint Scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) remember the relative time of caching as well as the location and content of their caches
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616 8519, USA
    J Comp Psychol 113:403-16. 1999
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Hippocampal growth and maintenance depend on food-caching experience in juvenile mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, USA
    Behav Neurosci 115:614-25. 2001
    ..Experience of both storing and recovery is required to initiate growth and maintain HF size...
  6. ncbi request reprint Changes in spatial memory mediated by experimental variation in food supply do not affect hippocampal anatomy in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    J Neurobiol 51:142-8. 2002
    ....
  7. pmc Effects of demanding foraging conditions on cache retrival accuracy in food-caching mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis 95616 8519, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 268:363-8. 2001
    ..Overall, our results suggest that demanding foraging conditions favour more accurate cache retrieval in food-caching birds...
  8. ncbi request reprint Scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) form integrated memories of the multiple features of caching episodes
    N S Clayton
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, USA
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 27:17-29. 2001
    ..The authors argue that the jays formed an integrated memory for the location and time of caching of particular foods...
  9. ncbi request reprint Testing episodic memory in animals: a new approach
    D P Griffiths
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California-Davis, Briggs Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Physiol Behav 73:755-62. 2001
    ..The development of a rodent model system could make an important contribution to our understanding of the neural, molecular, and behavioral mechanisms of mammalian episodic memory...
  10. ncbi request reprint Long-term unpredictable foraging conditions and physiological stress response in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)
    V V Pravosudov
    Section of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616-8519, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 123:324-31. 2001
    ..The potential costs and benefits of long-term increased corticosterone levels in resident food-caching birds are discussed...
  11. ncbi request reprint Hippocampal volume does not change seasonally in a non food-storing songbird
    D W Lee
    Department of Psychology, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840-0901, USA
    Neuroreport 12:1925-8. 2001
    ..These results suggest that seasonal changes in the hippocampus do not occur in this non food-storing species and may be specific to food-storing birds...
  12. ncbi request reprint Effects of experience and social context on prospective caching strategies by scrub jays
    N J Emery
    Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 8AA, UK
    Nature 414:443-6. 2001
    ..Our results suggest that jays relate information about their previous experience as a pilferer to the possibility of future stealing by another bird, and modify their caching strategy accordingly...
  13. ncbi request reprint Planning for the future by western scrub-jays
    C R Raby
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK
    Nature 445:919-21. 2007
    ..The results described here suggest that the jays can spontaneously plan for tomorrow without reference to their current motivational state, thereby challenging the idea that this is a uniquely human ability...